Barry J. Anson's research while affiliated with Northwestern University and other places

Publications (31)

Article
An attempt is made to define lips, and on Danforth's interpretation of homology, homologous lips are found at certain stages of development in some representatives of all classes of vertebrates. The primary lips characteristic of selachians, after the maxillary and premaxillary bones have developed within the territory of the upper lip (toadfish, c...
Article
Moderator Goodhill: I am going to start the order of the day's presentations with Dr. Rosen. I am going to ask him what he means by "window hearing," and whether he means that window hearing is normal hearing—simply minus the transformer action—or what other concepts he has on this score. Dr. Rosen: Well, truly, Vic, I do not believe I have any rea...
Article
The levator ani muscles and their fascia have been generally conceded to be the essential supports of the urinary bladder.Cystocele has been recognized to be a true hernia of the bladder—more specifically, a herniation of the fundus and trigon, which are those parts in association with the anterior vaginal wall.The degree of incontinence of urine i...

Citations

... Some researchers consider the plantaris as a vestigial organ because it has little effect on the knee and ankle (7,8,31). Cruveilhier (32) was the first to suggest that the plantaris lost its connection to the lower part of the foot in the evolutionary process and made a secondary connection to the calcaneus and therefore it is a vestigial organ. ...
... He also observed the rugosities ,,'hi ch had been described earlier by and Sterzi (1910). The nature of these rugosities and the histological character of the epithelium have been further described and figured by Anson and Nesselrod (1936), Anson and Wilson (1936), Bast, Anson and Gardner (1949), and Bast andAnson (1949, 1950). Such observations, and t hose of Secretan (1944), eem to have strengthened the vie'" that the otic sac is a resorptive mechanism for t he otic fluid . ...
... By 1938, McVay and Anson labeled the falx inguinalis as an artifact of dissection. Their argument was that unless the inguinal ligament was retracted and the inferior portion dissected, the falx inguinalis would not be apparent as previous authors had described because it did not have its characteristic falciform shape unless tension was applied to fibers contributing to the cremaster [7]. ...
... Posterior the rectus sheath formation is not a common arrangement in the opinion of several investigators since long (20)(21)(22). Even in 1940, McVay and Anson really commented that "Descriptions of the rectus sheath contained in our textbooks of anatomy are singularly alike; they are stereotyped and oversimplified" (21). ...
... Other case reports showed the same origin variations [34,35]. The incidence of the renal artery (RA) originating at the level of the celiac trunk is approximately 3% [33,36]. ...
... Although the anatomy of the trapezius muscle (TM) is well known, the origin of TM may be highly variable. It has been shown in a classical study involving 160 TM dissections in cadavers, that the origin of the TM may be higher than the 12th thoracic vertebra in more than 50% of the time, and could be as high as 8th thoracic vertebra, which directly affects the position of its lower border [3]. Preoperative determination of the exact location of the inferior border of TM is of utmost importance, since it may give the surgeon an idea of pedicle length sufficiency for the intended recipient area, especially in cases where muscle bulk is desired under the entire skin paddle, such as periauricular skin defects with lateral temporal bone resection and/or radical parotidectomy. ...
... These muscles have been interpreted as having coevolved with the act of suckling in mammals (Smith, 1992;Knoll, 2008). Conversely, sauropsids (e.g., crocodilians, birds, lizards, tuataras, etc.) do not possess "cheeks" as they are defined in mammals; although, some birds possess flaps of tissue that extend between the upper and lower jaw to cover the mouth labially (Anson, 1929;Knoll, 2008) that extend from either the rictal plate (at the caudal angle of the oral cavity between the upper and lower jaws) or directly from the overlying skin. Anson (1929) noted the presence of "lips" in lepidosaurs; although, these are not muscular lips; instead, they are flaps of skin that project buccally in relation to dentition, lingual to which, many times, also possess special intraoral glands. ...
... The spatial location and the high risk of either traumatic or surgical injuries led to a high number of anatomical and radiological studies. These studies mainly focused on the incidence of a Corona mortis (Adachi 1928;Ates et al. 2016;Berberoĝlu et al. 2001;Braithwaite 1952;Cloquet 1817;Darmanis et al. 2007;Duenas-Garcia et al. 2017;Dwight 1894;Gilroy et al. 1997; Hartmann 1881; Hesselbach 1819; Hoffmann 1878; Jastschinski 1891; Karakurt et al. 2002;Kawai et al. 2008;Lau and Lee 2003;Lee et al. 2013;Lipshutz 1918;Okcu et al. 2004;Pai et al. 2009;Perandini et al. 2018;Pfitzner 1889;Pick et al. 1942;Quain 1844;Rajive and Pillay 2015;Schlobig 1844;Stavropoulou-Deli and Anagnostopoulou 2013;Steinberg et al. 2017;Teague et al. 1996;Tornetta et al. 1996;Wada et al. 2017;Al-Talalwah 2016). In light of techniques to prevent blood loss and minimally invasive exposures to hernia detailed knowledge of the Corona mortis is generally mandatory for surgeons. ...
... In addition to the different prevalence rates, there is also a discrepancy between the study results regarding the origin and insertion of the muscle. While Jones et al. [15] report that the origin of the Gantzer's muscle is a coronoid process, Dykes and Anson [10] report it as the medial epicondyle. While it is more commonly accepted that the muscle attaches to the FPL, there are also studies that report insertion to the FDS, flexor digitorum profundus, or pronator teres muscles [6,25]. ...
... Other origins were much less frequent, with a pooled prevalence of 2.07% (95% CI 0.97-3.16%). These included 17 hepatic arteries [Adachi et al., 1928, Aslaner et al., 2017, Basile et al., 2008, Grieg et al., 1951, Kulkarni et al., 2020, Loukas et al., 2005, Pick et al., 1940, Shefna et al., 2019, Szewczyk et al., 2020, two superior mesenteric arteries [Kulkarni et al., 2020, So et al., 2009 and one dorsal pancreatic artery [Kimura et al., 2007]. Also included in this group were a RIPA arising from a common trunk for two suprarenal arteries and a gonadal artery [Shefna et al., 2019], two accessory RIPAs [Cauldwell et al., 1943], both from the abdominal aorta, two cases where it was not possible to distinguish between the accessory left hepatic and left gastric artery [Adachi et al., 1928] and eleven cases where the RIPA was not identified [So et al., 2009]. ...