Barbara J Stussman's research while affiliated with National Institutes of Health and other places

Publications (36)

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Objective: To examine the reasons why office-based physicians do or do not recommend four selected complementary health approaches to their patients in the context of the Andersen Behavioral Model. Design: Descriptive estimates of physician-level data from the 2012 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) Physician Induction Interview, a nat...
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Background: Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome is characterized by persistent and disabling fatigue, exercise intolerance, cognitive difficulty, and musculoskeletal/joint pain. Post–exertional malaise is a worsening of these symptoms after a physical or mental exertion and is considered a central feature of the illness. Scant observ...
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Objective: There are no nationally representative studies using a probability sample that have been published examining whether physicians recommend complementary health approaches (CHAs) to their patients, as previous research has focused only on selected medical specialties or a particular U.S. region. This article fills a void in the current lit...
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We used data from the nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to determine the 18-year trends in the overall rates of noncancer pain prevalence and pain-related interference, as well as in health care use attributable directly to pain management. The proportion of adults reporting painful health condition(s) increased from 32.9%...
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Complementary health is the use of holistic or unconventional medicine with mainstream Western medicine for health and wellness (1,2). Past research has identified yoga, meditation, and seeing a chiropractor as some of the most commonly used approaches (3). This report examines changes over time in the percentage of adults who used yoga, meditation...
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Yoga, meditation, and use of chiropractors are types of complementary health approaches developed outside of mainstream Western medicine (1-2). Although complementary health approaches as a whole are not widely used among children, previous work has established a rise in the use of selected approaches over time (3). This report presents the most re...
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Background and aims Despite the enormous body of literature spanning more than 50 years describing results of pain experiments, very few have used qualitative methods to explore subjects’ thoughts while scoring experimental painful stimuli, and none in the available literature have used qualitative interviews to do so. The current study examined ho...
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Background Despite a growing body of scientific literature exploring the nature of meditation there is limited information on the characteristics of individuals who use it. This is particularly true of comparative studies examining prevalence and predictors of use of various forms of meditation. Methods A secondary analysis was conducted using dat...
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Objective: This report examines the use of complementary health approaches among U.S. adults aged 18 and over who had a musculoskeletal pain disorder. Prevalence of use among this population subgroup is compared with use by persons without a musculoskeletal disorder. Use for any reason, as well as specifically to treat musculoskeletal pain disorde...
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Although most pain is acute and resolves within a few days or weeks, millions of Americans have persistent or recurring pain that may become chronic and debilitating. Medications may provide only partial relief from this chronic pain and can be associated with unwanted effects. As a result, many individuals turn to complementary health approaches a...
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Objective: This report presents estimates of expenditures on complementary health approach use among the U.S. population. Estimates are presented for adults and children separately and combined, as well as stratified by type of approach and family income. Methods: Combined data from 44,743 individuals aged 4 years and over, collected as part of...
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Key findings: Data from the 2002 and 2012 National Health Interview Surveys ● Between 2002 and 2012, the use of acupuncture, chiropractic, and massage therapy increased among adults who did not have health insurance coverage for these complementary health approaches. No change in use was observed among those who had coverage for these approaches....
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Objective—This report presents national estimates of selected wellness-related reasons for the use of natural product supplements, yoga, and spinal manipulation among U.S. adults in 2012. Self-reported perceived health outcomes were also examined. Methods—Data from 34,525 adults aged 18 and over collected as part of the 2012 National Health Intervi...
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National surveys suggest that millions of adults in the United States use complementary health approaches such as acupuncture, chiropractic manipulation, and herbal medicines to manage painful conditions such as arthritis, back pain and fibromyalgia. Yet, national and per person out-of-pocket (OOP) costs attributable to this condition-specific use...
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Complementary health practices are an important element of health/healthcare seeking behavior among adults in the United States. Reasons for use include medical need, prevention and wellness promotion, and cultural relevance. Survey studies published over the past several decades have provided important information on the use of complementary healt...
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Objective-This report presents national estimates of the use of complementary health approaches among adults in the United States across three time points. Trends in the use of selected complementary health approaches are compared for 2002, 2007, and 2012, and differences by selected demographic characteristics are also examined. Methods-Combined d...
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Objective-This report presents national estimates of the use of complementary health approaches among children aged 4-17 years in the United States. Selected modalities are compared for 2007 and 2012 to examine changes over time. Methods-Data from the 2007 and 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were analyzed for this report. The combined...
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Key findings: Data from the National Health Interview Survey, 2012 Use of nonvitamin, nonmineral dietary supplements (17.9%) was greater than any other complementary health approach used by U.S. adults in 2012. The use of practitioner-based chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation was nearly twice as high in the West North Central region as in the...
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The 2002, 2007, and 2012 complementary medicine questionnaires fielded on the National Health Interview Survey provide the most comprehensive data on complementary medicine available for the United States. They filled the void for large-scale, nationally representative, publicly available datasets on the out-of-pocket costs, prevalence, and reasons...
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Complementary and integrative strategies are widely used by families with children who have mental health diagnoses. The therapies used by these children include herbs, dietary supplements, massage, acupuncture, meditation, and naturopathy. The literature on efficacy of complementary and alternative approaches is of limited value, and studies are n...
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Background The overall prevalence of complementary medicine (CM) use among adults in the United States with diabetes has been examined both in representative national samples and in more restricted populations. However, none of these earlier studies attempted to identify predictors of CM use to treat diabetes among the populations sampled, nor look...
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We hypothesize that a substantial portion of individuals who forgo conventional care in a given year turn to some form of alternative medicine. This study also examines whether individuals who use only alternative medicine will differ substantially in health and sociodemographic status from individuals using neither alternative medicine nor convent...
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The aim of this study was to assess the construct validity of survey questions about the use of herbal and other nonvitamin/nonmineral dietary supplements. We conducted one-on-one, in-depth cognitive interviews with 32 respondents to test questions from the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) supplement for the 2007 National Health Intervi...
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This report presents selected estimates of costs of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among U.S. adults, the frequency of visits made to CAM providers, and the frequency of purchases of self-care CAM therapies. Data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), which is conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Preven...
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Surveys have generally found that individuals more likely to use complementary and alternative medicine are female, live in the western United States, are likely to have a health complaint, and have a higher socioeconomic status than do nonusers. What is not known is the extent to which those who use complementary and alternative medicine also enga...
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Using core survey, frame, and contact history data collected with the 2005 NHIS, a multi-purpose health survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a model of initial contact was developed and tested. Attempt-level, household-level, and social environmental measures were al...
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Research on nonresponse in surveys has largely focused on how nonrespondents differ from respondents, item nonresponse, and the use of incentives to increase response rates. Partially completed interviews and break-offs have not been studied in- depth. This dimension of nonresponse, between a hard refusal and complete participation, is of particula...

Citations

... The study variables try to observe the percentage deterioration of the patient with CFS, with respect to healthy people, whose variation in each of them is minimal or does not exist. [5][6][7] The identification of biomarkers that may contribute to the etiopathogenesis of the disease could reveal a new diagnostic and therapeutic approach. For this reason, the main aim of this study was to verify whether the mean percentage of oxygen use in the aerobic-anaerobic transition phase or isocapnic buffering (IB) was lower in women with CFS compared to healthy women, and if this variable, together with other respiratory variables obtained in CPET, could be used as screening biomarkers for the diagnosis of CFS. ...
... A new recognition of healing through indigenous practices is spreading in the United States, and the use of alternative and complementary medicine is on the rise. 17 According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), alternative and complementary medicine is defined as ''use health care approaches that are not typically part of conventional medical care or that may have origins outside of usual Western practice,'' when these practices are used in addition to biomedical care they are considered ''complementary.'' 18,19 Given evidence that Latine individuals experience limited access to biomedical health care, and the ability of THs to provide care that is linguistically and culturally appropriate, as well as the increasing interest in traditional forms of healing and wellness, the aims of this systematic review were to assess: (1) the prevalence of TH use and types/modalities used by U.S. Latine individuals; (2) health conditions/illnesses, for which TH care was sought; (3) reasons for TH use; and (4) extent of TH use and dual use, which is the use of both TH and biomedical health care. ...
... Pain is an increasingly prevalent health problem affecting 1.5 billion people globally, with the number of adults reporting painful health conditions rising from 32.9% in 1998 to 41.0% in 2014 in USA alone [1]. The severity of this condition deleteriously impacts the quality of life or work activities in approximately 7.4% of the population [2]. ...
... Complementary approaches can be described as treatments or preventative approaches to health that complement mainstream medical techniques (de Almeida Andrade & Schlechta Portella, 2018;Ernst, 2000;France et al., 2018). Between 20 and 40% of healthy children and over 50% of children with chronic illnesses report using complementary approaches (Vohra et al., 2008) with yoga, meditation, and chiropractor services being the most prevalent (Black et al., 2018). Specifically, mindfulness meditation has been shown to be particularly helpful for improving sleep outcomes, emotion regulation, and well-being in children (Burke, 2010;Dunning et al., 2019;Lin et al., 2019;Wilson et al., 2020;Zelazo & Lyons, 2012). ...
... The Brazilian National Health Survey (PNS) is undertaken every 5 years and considering data from the 2013 edition we observed that more than seven million adults reported using CAM, representing a prevalence of 4.5% [7]. When comparing the PNS data with those from other countries, we can observe variability in prevalence estimates: in the United States, the prevalence of CAM use was 33%, in Germany, it was 40%, and in Malaysia, it was 56% [7][8][9]. Thus, this article aims to estimate the prevalence of CAM use in the Brazilian adult population in 2019, and analyze factors associated with CAM use in Brazil. ...
... Across all conditions, FM patients reported the heat stimuli as less unpleasant than HCs, perhaps as a result of comparing the experimental pain to previous clinical pain episodes, as reported by over half of FM patients during a postexperimental interview session. 38 Finally, there were no effects of naloxone administration nor any interactions between group and drug on anticipation-, placebo-, and NPS-related activations. ...
... Meditation is a form of mental training practice and is frequently categorized into three types; devotional (focusing on understanding religious or spiritual meaning), mantra-based (focusing on a word or phrase), and mindfulness-based (focusing on the present) (Burke, Lam, Stussman, & Yang, 2017). A recent study indicates that 11.9 million American adults have reported practicing meditation in their lifetime with wellness and prevention as the most likely reason for this practice (Burke, et al.). ...
... More specifically, it has been found that up to 70% of Canadians experiencing back or neck pain used a type of CAM therapy in their treatment [10]. In addition, according to the 2012 National Health Information Survey, 50.6% of American adults who had neck pain utilized complementary health therapies [11,12]. Although the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) guidelines urge healthcare providers to first consider when an alternative treatment is effective, safe, and researched, studies have found that healthcare providers in the United States lack the knowledge, confidence, and training to provide proper guidance in referring their patients to CAM therapies/providers [13]. ...
... Due to undesirable side effects of long-term pharmacological treatments and knee surgery [7][8][9], complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies are increasingly used [10]. Acupuncture treatment represents the most popular CAM therapy [11,12], evidence from clinical trials and systemic reviews has suggested that acupuncture can be effective in treating pain and dysfunction in patients with KOA [9,[13][14][15]. ...
... 2 Despite how common CM use is during cancer care, healthcare professionals (HCPs) often do not ask patients about their use of these therapies, 3 nor is it documented in their electronic health record (EHR). 4 Although some CM therapies are efficacious and safe to use, 5,6 other therapies may pose risks such as interacting with cytotoxic agents, 7,8 inducing organ toxicity, 9 and antiplatelet activity, 10 or causing financial harm. 11,12 As such, lack of assessment, documentation, and discussion around CM use may pose risks to individuals with cancer who consider or choose to use these therapies. ...