Barbara Bender's research while affiliated with University College London and other places

Publications (9)

Article
Full-text available
In this paper we view the different practices of archaeology, anthropology, environmental reconstruction and geomorphology through the lens of fieldwork on the clitter fields and Bronze Age settlement patterns on Leskernick Hill, Bodmin Moor, southwest Britain. The moor forms one of the best preserved fossil prehistoric landscapes of Europe and has...
Book
This book represents an innovative experiment in presenting the results of a large-scale, multidisciplinary archaeological project. The authors and their team examined the Neolithic and Bronze Age landscapes on Bodmin Moor, southwest England, especially the site of Leskernick. The result is a multivocal, multidisciplinary telling of the stories of...
Article
Full-text available
This article considers conceptual links between producing installation art works in the present and interpreting prehistoric lifeworlds. We consider connections between the work of contemporary ‘landscape’, ‘environmental’ or ‘ecological’ artists and an on-going landscape archaeology project centred on Leskernick Hill, Bodmin Moor in the south-west...
Article
Full-text available
Most archaeological work on the British Bronze Age has been undertaken in Wessex. Here a team fr om UCL' s Institute of Archaeology and Department of Anthropology describe their investigation of a very different Bronze Age landscape on Bodmin Moor in Cornwall. Their project, at the site of Leskernick, is innovative in its methodology and in how it...
Article
Full-text available
The first season of an on-going project focused on Leskernick Hill, north-west Bodmin Moor, Cornwall, entailed a preliminary settlement survey and limited excavation of a stone row terminal. Leskernick comprises a western and a southern settlement situated on the lower, stony slopes of the hill and including 51 circular stone houses constructed usi...
Article
Full-text available
Preliminary report on some of the results of the first season of work at Leskernick Hill, Bodmin Moor, Cornwall. Cornish Archaeology 34

Citations

... Post-processual and Interpretative Archaeology in the 1980s and 1990s developed new theory and practice which embraced the situated nature of the archaeologist writing the past in the present (Hodder 1986(Hodder , 1999Shanks and Tilley 1987). For example, the Leskernick team undertook pioneering experimentation in narrative and reflexivity to explore the later prehistoric structures, settlements and landscape on Bodmin Moor, Cornwall (Bender et al. 1997(Bender et al. , 2007. This included multi-vocal approaches to fieldwork, artistic interventions such as wrapping stones to highlight structural features, and recreating house doorways for phenomenological studies. ...
... However, the general consensus among its proponents appears to be that the experience of sites and landscapes gives us a much broader context than bare data can allow for, and can lead to new ideas and explanations for the physical remains. As an example, some of the technique's pioneers -Sue Hamilton, Christopher Tilley and Barbara Bender -conducted a phenomenological investigation of the Leskernick Bronze Age settlement in 2010 (Tilley, Hamilton and Bender, 2010). Their approach was decidedly low-tech but utilised many methods to engage the feeling of experience such as the now-famous wooden "doorframe" that was used to simulate a doorway out of a bronze age house and thus instil an experience of what it might have been like to sit in the completed house (Ibid 2010, pp. ...
... We need to move to methods of fieldwork that are open to diverse inputs and theoretical perspectives in constructing an understanding of sites, places, and the people that lived in, and used them, rather than clinging to an academic perspective that is neurotic about mixing theoretical stances (Hamilton et al. 2008). Whether all approaches will receive the same amount of academic, commercial, or public attention is of course another matter. ...
... Geographers are uniquely placed to respond to this call. As is illustrated in somewhat dormant but still-relevant debates on the persistence of the unity and division between 'physical' and 'human' geographies (Harrison et al., 2004;Massey, 1999;O'Sullivan, 2004), there is a breadth of expertise within the discipline that is particularly well-suited to a research problem at the nexus of life and nonlife, or at the designation and dissolution of those categories. Povinelli (2016: 36) formulates this problem as interdisciplinary -'we need to reopen channels of communication across the natural sciences and critical humanities and social sciences'but to geographers it might appear intra-disciplinary as we look across department silos (soil science, geology, health, critical and political geography) to pursue research that can piece together evidence of the harms that emerge through the contingencies of life and nonlife. ...
... through the impact of human activities in a roundabout way. The processes of urbanization in antiquity provided many illuminating examples of such impacts [1], yet there are much earlier, prehistoric, landscape changes (e.g., [2], so much so that their study formed a research sub-discipline, 'landscape archaeology' (e.g., [3][4][5]). Large-scale concentrations of stone artifacts are known from as early as Lower Paleolithic times [6] and references therein), yet it is only during the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB) that landscape transformations are of such a great scale that it changed drastically the original landscape (e.g., Ramat Tamar [7,8]). ...