Austin Wyatt's research while affiliated with UNSW Sydney and other places

Publications (8)

Article
Full-text available
Both corporate leaders and military commanders turn to ethical principle sets when they search for guidance concerning moral decision making and best practice. In this article, after reviewing several such sets intended to guide the responsible development and deployment of artificial intelligence and autonomous systems in the civilian domain, we p...
Chapter
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This chapter compares online manipulation enhanced by autonomous technologies to its more old-fashioned antecedents. We begin with an account of the general structure of manipulative practices and only then proceed to a more specific exploration of online manipulation that fits within it. The very question of manipulation raises important issues ab...
Article
Full-text available
The removal of direct human involvement from the decision to apply lethal force is at the core of the controversy surrounding autonomous weapon systems, as well as broader applications of artificial intelligence and related technologies to warfare. Far from purely a technical question of whether it is possible to remove soldiers from the ‘pointy en...
Article
The rapidly emerging scholarly literature responding to autonomous weapon systems has come to dominate our perceptions of future warfare. Scientists, governments, militaries, and civil society organisations continue to debate how to respond to their development. This paper draws on empirical data to consider how emerging defence leaders in the Aust...
Article
Despite the growing breadth of research related to the perceived risks and benefits of Autonomous Weapon Systems (AWS), there remains a dearth of research into understanding how perceptions of AWS among military officers are affected by design factors. This paper demonstrates that ease of use, and user perception of the concept of using an autonomo...
Article
The question of whether new rules or regulations are required to govern, restrict, or even prohibit the use of autonomous weapons systems has been the subject of debate for the better part of a decade. Despite the claims of advocacy groups, the way ahead remains unclear since the international community has yet to agree on a specific definition of...
Chapter
While the Conference on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCW)-sponsored process has steadily slowed, and occasionally stalled, over the past five years, the pace of technological development in both the civilian and military spheres has accelerated. In response, this chapter suggests the development of a normative framework that would establish common...
Article
The emergence of increasingly autonomous uninhabited systems has sparked understandable concern among policymakers, defence personnel, and academics, as well as civil-society. Quite reasonably, the body of literature that is arising in response to this concern has largely remained focused on the ethical, legal and practical consequences of “killer...

Citations

... These efforts can, and arguably have, had a chilling impact on the willingness of researchers to openly consider military values and potential military applications when conducting related research. The same study found that strong opposition was reduced by almost two-thirds, to 20%, when asked about developing AI tools for military surveillance and to only 6% when the AI application was limited to military logistics [16]. This distinction has some fascinating connotations for further research and would, theoretically allow for some level of military value consideration. ...
... A related research field more focused on these high-stakes and time sensitive scenarios is meaningful human control (for which see e.g. Methnani et al., 2021;de Sio & van den Hoven, 2018;Umbrello, 2021;Braun et al., 2021;Verdiesen et al., 2021;Wyatt & Galliott, 2021;Cavalcante Siebert et al., 2022). ...