Austin S. Lee's research while affiliated with Carnegie Mellon University and other places

Publications (9)

Conference Paper
Our work explores the vision of integrating 3d data collected through photogrammetry into the source of the information in a physical space leveraging Mixed Reality (MR) interface platform. As a proof-of-concept prototype design, we show augmentation of the 3D data associated with the physical surrounding using HoloLens and Photogrammetry technique...
Conference Paper
Corus is a concept for a holographic candle system that helps cohabitating couples become more synchronized in their sleep routines. The components of our proposed system design are a main candle in the bedroom and other "satellite" candles around the home. In our proposed design, holographic candles will offer calming notification and ambient feed...
Conference Paper
This paper documents an attempt to support parents and children in co-creating dynamic, fun and consistent bedtime routines through immersive and interactive storytelling. The proposed system, Iyagi, would be designed to ease the friction experienced by parents and children as they transition from evening activities into the bedtime routine as well...
Conference Paper
When a person gets to a door and wants to get in, what do they do? They knock. In our system, the user's specific knock pattern authenticates their identity, and opens the door for them. The system empowers people's intuitive actions and responses to affect the world around them in a new way. We leverage IOT, and physical computing to make more tec...
Conference Paper
In this paper, we describe ShapeShift, our initial exploration into creating a holistic object augmentation by extending physical properties of objects with augmented reality. As a first step, we choose manipulations of shading and shadow for exploration. Shading and shadow are form-giving properties of an object. These attributes play two main rol...
Conference Paper
This proposal presents a modular system design for a set of programmable tools with various form factors inspired by the relations between human body parts and industrial elements. By providing functional forms to sensors and actuators, and tangible methods of programming behaviors to the objects, we propose a more customizable experience in the ar...
Conference Paper
In this paper we introduce Click, a physical coding platform that utilizes smart devices as component pieces. Click encourages group learning of coding by turning individual smart devices into code blocks. These code blocks can then be connected to form programs. By contributing more personal devices to the code chain, users are able to increase pr...
Conference Paper
In this paper, we describe Expressing Intent - our initial exploration of rich interactions between human actors and three connected objects -- (1) a bookshelf that learns about taste, (2) a radio that determines mood, and (3) a window that augments visual reality. These objects interpret and express 'intent' in a multitude of ways within the conte...
Conference Paper
This paper describes a new Augmented Reality (AR) system called HoloLens developed by Microsoft, and the interaction model for supporting collaboration in this space with other users. Whereas traditional AR collaboration is between two or more head-mounted displays (HMD) users, we describe collaboration between a single HMD user and others who join...

Citations

... Each variation tests whether alterations of an object's physical characteristic would help participants interpret invisible underlying information. Initial work on the topic of altering shadows to give illusion of weight changes in an object was published as a work in progress paper [6]; the examples in this paper formed the basis of the current body of experiments. ...
... Holographic candles were utilized to offer calming notifications and ambient feedback, thus nudging the users to go to sleep at optimal self-set times. [12] Holographic displays. Holographic displays could be used for helping people to adopt healthy lifestyles. ...
... Through the glove, users can explore objects by grasping them and listening to narratives extracted from each object. In genieBottles (Mazalek 2001), the physical bottles provide graspable interfaces for invisible narratives, and in Iyagi (Krishnaswamy et al. 2017), the cohesive connection between tagged everyday objects enables children to accomplish their bedtime tasks while being immersed in storytelling by their parents. ...
... Design fictions also offer an accessible entry point for complex topics, such as ethics in data science [68], sometimes in the guise of a mundane object like an IKEA catalog [15]. Multiple workshops have used fiction to inspire creative thinking in their participants [1,17,60]. HCI researchers have also begun to more explicitly engage with fiction-specifically science fiction-as inspiration for new research areas like shape-changing displays [93]. ...
... Summary: As discussed before, we evaluated a collection of patents as well as innovative ideas by large food companies that try to make the food ordering process more entertaining and streamline, taking away the norms of waitress/waiter interaction and replacing them with interactive computer systems that can process food or drink orders as well as take the payment, giving the customer a new experience as well as new social interactions 0:6 • Luke Jones and Charith Perera [29]. We also notice the strength of Arduino or likewise micro-controllers in the space of ubiquitous computing with both the Empowering Occupational Therapist [28] and MessageBag prototype [16] utilising them to great advantage. ...
... Studies from the fields of psychology [19], human-computer interaction [20], and technology-enhanced learning [21] suggest that collaborative learning with tangibles is an essential research area [11,22] because tangibles make the interactive interface intuitive and support collaborative activities better [20]. Currently, tangibles have been used in many collaborative scenarios, such as exploration [23][24][25], problem solving [26][27][28], skill development [29,30], and communication [15,31]. The main purposes of using tangibles [11] were to facilitate collaborative learning, teach skills such as programming and languages, and provide an embodied learning environment or experience. ...
... Most of the papers about asynchronous collaboration in MR allow the creation and consumption of annotations, like virtual graffiti and photos which are placed at certain locations within the immersive environment and can be viewed and interacted with by other collaborators at another time [17,24,19,6,31]. Irlitti et al. [16] are researching combination methods for tangible markers and augmented annotations which can be left for the next worker. ...