Ariadna Nieto-Espinet's research while affiliated with Universitat de Lleida and other places

Publications (20)

Article
Animal management is shaped by its environmental and landscape context, but these factors are rarely investigated quantitatively in zooarchaeological studies. Here we aim to examine the relationship between trends in zooarchaeological data and environmental and climatic dynamics between the Middle Bronze Age and Late Antiquity in lowland northern I...
Article
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Log Size Indexes (LSI) allow the increase of the number of data and have been used in a number of zooarchaeological studies since 1950. However, some standards to calculate the log ratios remain unpublished, the calculation of the indexes can be tedious, and it is further hindered by the diversity of data recording practices. The R package ‘zoolog’...
Book
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The introduction and spread of the Neolithic “way of life” in Europe was a process that took several millennia, followed by different rhythms and displayed singularities in each geographic area. It was therefore a very complex phenomenon that, despite highly significant advances in research in recent decades, is yet to be fully understood. To deepe...
Article
Full-text available
The introduction and spread of the Neolithic “way of life” in Europe was a process that took several millennia, followed by different rhythms and displayed singularities in each geographic area. It was therefore a very complex phenomenon that, despite highly significant advances in research in recent decades, is yet to be fully understood. To deepe...
Article
Full-text available
Sheep and goat are often herded together and show morphological similarities in their skeleton. Being able to identify archaeological remains of these two taxa to species level is particularly important for understanding and characterising past herding practices. Discrete criteria are now available to identify a large number of their bones and teet...
Chapter
We present our experiences with a series of ‘forgotten groups’ that empower themselves through outreach activities. The authors coordinate or advise different activities, but the protagonists and promoters are those people, the ‘forgotten groups’. This work includes a description of objectives, methods and practices when coordinating inclusive outr...
Article
This study uses faunal and epigraphic evidence from the valley of Cabrera de Mar in present-day Catalonia (Spain) as proxies for understanding complex processes and dynamics of cultural change between the late Iron Age and early Roman times. The faunal remains indicate significant dietary change, although the epigraphic evidence implies that langua...
Article
Under the direction of Alexia Echevarría Sánchez, the archaeological excavation firm Grupo Ánfora carried out test excavations on the Cabezo La Joya in Huelva (Andalusia, Spain) from April to September 2019. It is the site of a necropolis which has served as a point of reference for Tartessian archaeology since the 1970s. The new finds include eigh...
Article
Full-text available
Throughout the Western provinces of the Roman Empire, greater economic and political connectivity had a major impact on agricultural production, which grew in scale and specialisation after integration with the Roman state. However, uniquely in Western Europe, farming strategies in Italy began to evolve centuries before the Roman conquest, and many...
Article
Mobility is crucial in animal husbandry to overcome scarcity of food and the related over-grazing of pastures. It is also essential to reduce the inbreeding rate of animal populations, which is known to have a negative impact on fertility and productivity. Complex societies with a strong territorial component developed during the Iron Age in Southe...
Article
Dental Microwear Analysis (DMA) is currently used for obtaining information on diet of different animal species. Low-magnification Microwear Dental Analysis (LMDA) is a DMA technique based on the identification of microfeatures (pits and scratches) on the tooth enamel surface. During the last decade, Dental Microwear Texture Analysis (DMTA) has gai...
Article
Full-text available
Horse domestication revolutionized warfare and accelerated travel, trade, and the geographic expansion of languages. Here, we present the largest DNA time series for a non-human organism to date, including genome-scale data from 149 ancient animals and 129 ancient genomes (≥1-fold coverage), 87 of which are new. This extensive dataset allows us to...
Data
Results of chi-squared tests on livestock NISP. (XLSX)
Data
List of sites with data on chronology, analysis group, NISP, number of LSI values, and associated references. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Domestication of wild cattle, sheep, and pigs began a process of body size diminution. In most of Western Europe this process continued across prehistory and was not reversed until the Roman period. However, in Italy, an increase in livestock body size occurred during the Iron Age, earlier than the Western provinces. In order to better understand t...
Data
Results of Mann-Whitney U tests on LSI values. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
Animal mobility is a common strategy to overcome scarcity of food and the related over-grazing of pastures. It is also essential to reduce the inbreeding rate of animal populations, which is known to have a negative impact on fertility and productivity. The present paper shows the geographic range of sheep provisioning in different phases of occupa...

Citations

... There is no general rule in the choice of which reference to use for standardisation and several references are now available publicly ( (Pozo et al., 2022) and references there in https://cran.r-project.org/web/ packages/zoolog/index.html)). ...
... La comunidad experta considera que hace aproximadamente 12.000 años somos agricultores y ganaderos (Skoglund et al., 2022;Borrell et al., 2022). No obstante, este tipo de afirmaciones se ven sujetas a continuos cambios en base a los nuevos hallazgos. ...
... Since the 1980's, a new statistical theory of shape was developed (Adams et al., 2004) also named geometric morphometrics (Bookstein, 1978), which is now routinely applied in zooarchaeology and has proven highly reliable for distinguishing the diversity of wild and domestic forms of suines (Cucchi et al., 2011(Cucchi et al., , 2016Evin et al., 2015) equines (Cucchi et al., 2017), bovines (Cucchi et al., 2019) and caprines (Jeanjean et al., 2022). Geometric morphometrics have been applied to SAC first and second phalanges as well as scapulae (Hernańdez et al., 2021;Hernández, 2017, 2019) but only to distinguish llama from guanaco. ...
... This case study has been partially covered in other papers from our team (Gibaja et al. 2018;Guzmán et al. 2019;Gibaja et al. 2022) but to date it has never been presented with the depth of the present work. It is important to note that contribution from scientists-educators was ever-present, ensuring the content and scientific rigour of the activities, so that all individuals participating directly or indirectly could differentiate the scientific knowledge from playful, entertaining, humorous, dramatic or narrative elements. ...
... In Western Europe, this increase in body size has been documented in Britain (Johnstone 2004;Albarella et al. 2008), France (Méniel 1984;Lepetz 1996;Forest and Rodet-Belarbi 2002;Frémondeau et al. 2017;Duval and Clavel 2018), Belgium (Pigière 2017), the Netherlands (Lauwerier 1988), Germany (Teichert 1984;Groot 2017), Switzerland (Breuer et al. 1999;Deschler-Erb 2015, 2017), the Balearic Islands ) and the Iberian peninsula (Altuna 1980;Colominas and Saña 2009;Colominas 2013;Colominas et al. 2017). However, within continental-scale trends, evidence of diversions and different regional rhythms are also found: Portugal (Valenzuela-Lamas and Detry 2017;Nieto-Espinet et al. 2021) and Rhaetia (Trixl et al. 2017) show little change in livestock size after the Roman conquest. Zooarchaeological evidence also demonstrates that this reorganisation of animal production, although profound, was not permanent: in many areas changes to species representation, carcass processing and animal size relaxed or reversed over Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages (e.g. ...
... Different degrees of engagement in agricultural practice would have had a significant impact on localized animal exploitation, in particular, the use of cattle. A more intense and extensive agricultural activity would have favored animal labour in the fields, and, therefore, the investment in large specimens, potentially even oxen, for traction, which would have significantly increased land productivity; by contrast, small-scale agricultural systems would have incentivized human labor, and, therefore, the exploitation of smaller and cheaper cows for secondary products and light work (Bogaard et al., 2019;Trentacoste et al., 2021). The use of cattle for traction in Northern China during the late Shang period has been demonstrated by paleopathological studies on animal bones (Lin et al., 2018), however, the poor conditions of our assemblages hampered such analysis. ...
... Similarly, comparison of data from the civitates of the Nervii and the Tungri demonstrated how these adjacent regions evolved somewhat different cattle husbandry strategies during the Roman period (Pigière, 2017; see also Paris, 2018). Other recent regional syntheses have been undertaken in Raetia (Trixl et al. 2017), Pannonia Inferior (Lyublyanovics, 2010), the Iberian Peninsula (Grau-Sologestoa, 2015;Nieto-Espinet et al., 2021;, Gallia Narbonensis (Nieto-Espinet et al., 2020), northern Gaul (Lepetz and Morand, 2017;Jouanin and Yvinec, 2019), and Egypt (Leguilloux, 2018), just to name a few of the many studies that have been published. In Britain, Iron Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon national surveys (Albarella, 2007;King, 2019;Holmes, 2014;Duval and Albarella, 2022) and regional case studies Albarella, 2020;King, 2020;Rizzetto and Albarella, 2022) have been supplemented by the initiative hosted by the Archaeology Data Service (ADS) to make osteological data available online for central England (dataset Albarella and Pirnie, 2008). ...
... The rest of the year (between 3 and 6 months), they are fed in the meadow (>80% monocot plants) and receive hay (it may include lucerne, barley, and meadow hay) when they are in the sheepfold during the birthing season (2 months). Studies on dental microwear (LMDA and DMTA) have been conducted on this reference system (Ibáñez et al., 2020;Jiménez-Manchón et al., 2020). ...
... Phylogenetic studies of horse breeds, modern as well as ancient, have utilized mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) coding sequences or, more commonly, the hypervariable region (HVR) in the noncoding D-loop (Guimaraes et al., 2020;Kavar & Dovc, 2008;Vilá et al., 2001;Vilstrup et al., 2013;Vorobieva et al., 2020;Yoon et al., 2018), but more recently, whole genome sequences have also begun to be analyzed (Fages et al., 2019;Gaunitz et al., 2018;Librado et al., 2021). A global phylogenetic network by Jansen et al. (2002) showed 17 major haplogroups based on the mitochondrial D-loop sequences from modern horses. ...
... In 2016, two comprehensive studies with a collection of archaeozoological data for two Italian regions were published: a study of meat consumption in the early Middle Ages Central Italy (Rome and Latium) (Minniti, 2016) and a study of dietary habits in northern Italy . Northern Italy was also the focus of a comparative analysis by a European Research Council funded project led by Silvia Valenzuela-Lamas (Trentacoste et al., 2018;. This explored changing farming strategies from the Bronze Age to Late Antiquity, and was underpinned by a study of biometrical aspects of faunal remains. ...