Anup Basil Mathew's research while affiliated with Chennai Mathematical Institute and other places

Publications (6)

Article
Full-text available
Infinite games with imperfect information are known to be undecidable unless the information flow is severely restricted. One fundamental decidable case occurs when there is a total ordering among players, such that each player has access to all the information that the following ones receive. In this paper we consider variations of this hierarchy...
Article
We present a general theorem for distributed synthesis problems in coordination games with $\omega$-regular objectives of the form: If there exists a winning strategy for the coalition, then there exists an "essential" winning strategy, that is obtained by a retraction of the given one. In general, this does not lead to finite-state winning strateg...
Conference Paper
Infinite games with imperfect information are deemed to be undecidable unless the information flow is severely restricted. One fundamental decidable case occurs when there is a total ordering among players, such that each player has access to all the information that the following ones receive. In this paper we consider variations of this hierarchy...
Article
Infinite games with imperfect information tend to be undecidable unless the information flow is severely restricted. One fundamental decidable case occurs when there is a total ordering among players, such that each player has access to all the information that the following ones receive. In this paper we consider variations of this hierarchy princ...
Article
Infinite games where several players seek to coordinate under imperfect information are believed to be intractable, unless the information is hierarchically ordered among the players. We identify a class of games for which joint winning strategies can be constructed effectively without restricting the direction of information flow. Instead, our con...
Article
Full-text available
Infinite games where several players seek to coordinate under imperfect information are known to be intractable, unless the information flow is severely restricted. Examples of undecidable cases typically feature a situation where players become uncertain about the current state of the game, and this uncertainty lasts forever. Here we consider game...

Citations

... Like in the single-process scenario, synthesis in distributed systems can be modeled as a game, which, in this context, are partial information games played between a cooperating set of processes against the environment [17,18,19,20]. With the exception of Berwanger et al. [20], all the above approaches assume static, reliable networks. ...
... Other approaches have been introduced to retain decidability when reasoning about strategies in MAS. A notable direction involves imposing a hierarchy on the information, or the observations, of the agents [33,34,35,36,37]. This constraints in a well-structured way the information that agents possess. ...
... Acknowledgements This work was supported by the European Union Seventh Framework Programme under Grant Agreement 601148 (CASSTING) and by the Indo-French Formal Methods Lab (LIA Informel). A preliminary version (Berwanger et al. [6]) was presented at ATVA 2015: the International Symposium on Automated Technology for Verification and Analysis. ...
... Some other decidable fragments can be further obtained by adapting decidable cases of the distributed-synthesis problem, or the the existence of winning strategies in multi-agent games with imperfect information. We therefore may generalise the decidability of the distributed-synthesis problem in architectures without information forks [25], or utilise the decidability of the problem of the existence of a winning strategy in multi-player games with finite knowledge gaps [14]. ...
... We believe that the next steps are, first, to see whether the syntactical fragments studied for SL with perfect information, such as One-Goal or Boolean-Goal Strategy Logic, can be transferred to BSL and then to ESL, and see whether they enjoy better complexity properties. The second natural move would be to look at structures which are known to work well with multiple agents with imperfect information: hierarchical knowledge [7,20], recurring common knowledge of the state [6]. . . ...