Annukka K Lindell's research while affiliated with La Trobe University and other places

Publications (66)

Article
When posing for portraits the position you adopt influences perceptions. As the left hemiface (controlled by the emotion-dominant right hemisphere) expresses emotion more intensely, left cheek portraits communicate stronger emotion than right cheek portraits. This phenomenon influences perceptions of both emotional expressivity and professional spe...
Article
Left-handedness has long been associated with a range of negative attributes, including increased mental illness, criminal behaviour, and substance use. As previous reports have focussed on clinical and/or pathological samples, the present study drew on a large, representative, longitudinal study of Australians to assess the role of handedness in p...
Article
Portraits of humans favour the left cheek, with emotion thought to drive this posing asymmetry. In primates the emotion-dominant right hemisphere predominantly controls the left hemiface, rendering the left cheek anatomically more expressive than the right. As perceptions of nonhuman primates vary with genetic relatedness, depictions of nonhuman pr...
Article
The growth of social media has catalyzed a shift in marketing expenditure away from traditional print media. As Instagram posts featuring left cheek poses gain more "likes" than right cheek poses, advertisers and social media influencers would likely benefit from favoring the left cheek. While previous investigations of posing biases in print adver...
Article
Full-text available
People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often present with comorbid impairments. As over 70% of children with ASD meet the criteria for at least one comorbid psychiatric disorder, comorbidity is the rule rather than the exception. Some comorbid psychopathologies are especially prevalent, including schizophrenia, depression and attention deficit...
Article
The left hemiface expresses emotion more intensely than the right. Because emotional expressions contract the facial muscles and wrinkle the skin, theoretically the left hemiface’s greater expressivity should prompt more pronounced expression lines and wrinkles on the left than right side of the face. As wrinkles are the most salient age cue, we in...
Article
When posing for portraits, humans favour the left cheek. This preference is argued to stem from the left cheek’s greater expressivity: as the left hemiface is predominantly controlled by the emotion-dominant right hemisphere, it expresses emotion more intensely than the right hemiface. Whether this left cheek bias extends to our closest primate rel...
Article
As the right hemisphere is dominant for emotion processing, the left cheek expresses emotion more intensely than the right cheek. This prompts a leftward bias: people offer the left cheek to communicate emotion and viewers perceive left cheek poses as more emotive. Perceptions of trustworthiness are positively influenced by emotional expressivity,...
Article
Left-handers have been persecuted by right-handers for millennia. This right bias is evident cross-culturally, linguistically (right is literally and figuratively ‘right’, with lefties being described as ‘gauche’, ‘sinister’ and ‘cack-handed’), and environmentally (e.g., equipment design, including power tools, ticket machines, and lecture-room des...
Article
In social media’s attention economy “likes” are currency; photos showing faces attract more “likes.” Previous research has established a left cheek bias in photos uploaded to social media, but whether left cheek poses induce more engagement than right cheek poses remains to be determined. The present study thus examined whether pose orientation inf...
Article
Over 100 years ago Lombroso [(1876/2006). Criminal man. Durham: Duke University Press] proposed a biological basis for criminality. Based on inspection of criminals’ skulls he theorized that an imbalance of the cerebral hemispheres was amongst 18 distinguishing features of the criminal brain. Specifically, criminals were less lateralized than noncr...
Chapter
Though superficially symmetrical, the human face expresses emotion asymmetrically. Darwin (1872) first noted this phenomenon, conceding to being at a loss to explain why expressions such as smiling and sneering defiance were predominantly one-sided. Emotion lateralization offers a plausible account. Because the lower two-thirds of the face is contr...
Article
The left (LH) and right (RH) hemispheres are thought to implement different mechanisms for visual word recognition; the LH’s parallel encoding strategy is more efficient than the RH’s serial, letter-by-letter analysis. Here we examine differences in hemispheric language processing strategy by investigating repetition priming of compound words (e.g....
Article
Full-text available
Painted and photographic portraits of others show an asymmetric bias: people favor their left cheek. Both experimental and database studies confirm that the left cheek bias extends to selfies. To date all such selfie studies have been cross-sectional; whether individual selfie-takers tend to consistently favor the same pose orientation, or switch b...
Article
Atypical lateralization is evident in developmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders and dyslexia. Moreover, atypical lateralization is linked to language impairments: reduced or reversed lateralization is associated with poorer language outcomes. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) result from the deleterious effects of prenatal...
Article
Portrait pose orientations influence perception: the left cheek is more emotionally expressive; females' right cheeks appear more attractive. Posing biases are established in paintings, photographs, and advertisements, however, book covers have not previously been examined. This paper assesses cover image orientation in a book genre that frequently...
Article
In the history of portraiture, left cheek poses dominate. However, self-portraits favor the right cheek. Previous studies consistently report left biases for portraits of others and right biases for self-portraits; only one study has examined self-portrait pose orientation across a single artist’s corpus. The present study investigated posing biase...
Article
People perceive the left cheek as more emotionally expressive than the right. Both configural and featural information enable the evaluation of emotional expressions; whether they make equivalent contributions to the left cheek bias is undetermined. As scrambling faces disrupts configural processing whilst leaving featural information intact, we in...
Article
Like language, emotion is a lateralized function. Because the right hemisphere typically dominates emotion processing, people express stronger emotion on the left side of their face. This prompts a left cheek bias: we offer the left cheek to express emotion and rate left cheek portraits more emotionally expressive than right cheek portraits. Though...
Article
When posing for portraits people tend to offer their left cheek. This bias is also evident in selfies: informal photographic self-portraits taken with a smartphone. Mechanical biases have been argued to influence selfie posing orientation (predicting that using the left hand favours a stronger left cheek bias), however this hypothesis has not been...
Article
As the left hemiface is controlled by the emotion-dominant right hemisphere, emotion is expressed asymmetrically. Portraits showing a model's left cheek consequently appear more emotive. Though the left cheek bias is well established in adults, it has not been investigated in children. To determine whether the left cheek biases for emotion percepti...
Article
People with schizophrenia show atypical patterns of lateralization, including reduced structural and functional asymmetries in language-related brain regions. Given conceptualization of a continuum of schizotypal traits, people with normal but high levels of schizotypal traits may also exhibit atypical language lateralization. The present study was...
Article
Humans are exquisitely sensitive to beauty: it plays a primary role in impression formation and influences subsequent judgements, favouring the beautiful. Why? This paper examines the factors underlying beauty's effect on the mind of the beholder. First we review the evolutionary importance of beauty, including its role as reward, before focusing o...
Article
Full-text available
Genius and madness have long been thought to be intimately entwined. However, the idea remains controversial: some rail against the stereotype of the mad scientist or the crazy artist (e.g., Schlesinger, 2009, 2012), while others note higher incidences of mental illness amongst creative geniuses, including prize-winning authors, visual artists, and...
Article
There remains conflict in the literature about the lateralisation of affective face perception. Some studies have reported a right hemisphere advantage irrespective of valence, whereas others have found a left hemisphere advantage for positive, and a right hemisphere advantage for negative, emotion. Differences in injury aetiology and chronicity, p...
Article
The literature about the lateralization of facial emotion perception according to valence (positive, negative) is conflicting; investigating the underlying processes may shed light on why some studies show right-hemisphere dominance across valence and other studies demonstrate hemispheric differences according to valence. This is the first clinical...
Article
People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show superior performance for tasks requiring detail-focused processing. Atypical neural connectivity and reduced interhemispheric communication are posited to underlie this cognitive advantage. Given recent conceptualization of autism as a continuum, we sought to investigate whether people with normal but...
Article
Full-text available
Where hemispheric lateralization was once considered an exclusively human trait, it is increasingly recognized that hemispheric asymmetries are evident throughout the animal kingdom. Emotion is a prime example of a lateralized function: given its vital role in promoting adaptive behavior and hence survival, a growing body of research in affective n...
Article
This study considers the role of verbal working memory in sentence comprehension in typically developing English-speaking children. Fifty-six (N = 56) children aged 4;0–6;6 completed a test of language comprehension that contained sentences which varied in complexity, standardized tests of vocabulary and nonverbal intelligence, and three tests of m...
Article
Full-text available
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressive condition involving degeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons. Recent research suggests that a proportion of persons with ALS show a profile similar to that of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), with this group of ALS patients exhibiting social cognitive deficits. Although social cog...
Article
Language is typically a highly lateralized function, with atypically reduced or reversed lateralization linked to language impairments. Given the diagnostic and prognostic role of impaired language for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), this paper reviews the growing body of literature that examines patterns of lateralization in individuals with ASD...
Article
Over the past decade the neuromarketing of educational products has become increasingly common. Researchers have however expressed concern about the misapplication of neuroscience to education marketing, fearing that consumers may be deceived into investing in apparently “brain‐based” products under the misapprehension that they will be more effect...
Article
When posing for a painted or photographic portrait, people are more likely to offer their left, rather than right, cheek (e.g., the Mona Lisa). Why? This paper reviews research investigating the left cheek bias, and the reasons underlying this posing asymmetry. Ruling out mechanical and perceptual biases, the paper focuses on the silent emotional a...
Article
How the brain is lateralised for emotion processing remains a key question in contemporary neuropsychological research. The right hemisphere hypothesis asserts that the right hemisphere dominates emotion processing, whereas the valence hypothesis holds that positive emotion is processed in the left hemisphere and negative emotion is controlled by t...
Article
When posing for a portrait people tend to offer the left cheek; however self-portraits typically depict right cheek poses. Why? If the right cheek bias for self-portraits results from artists offering their left cheeks to a mirror, then right cheek self-portraits should become increasingly infrequent following the introduction of affordable cameras...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents a critical account of research into the non-motor symptoms associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Although research examining the cognitive and behavioural features of ALS has been extensively report -ed, social communication and emotion recognition changes have not been comprehensively explored. Furthermore, the c...
Article
Though the left cheek appears more emotive, perceptions of attractiveness vary with gender. For the first time, this study assessed the relationship between perceptions of emotion (happiness) and attractiveness in naturalistic photographic portraits. One hundred ninety-two participants (63 male; 129 female) viewed pairs of left and right cheek pose...
Article
People with autism show attenuated cerebral lateralisation for emotion processing. Given growing appreciation of the notion that autism represents a continuum, the present study aimed to determine whether atypical hemispheric lateralisation is evident in people with normal but above average levels of autism-like traits. One hundred and twenty-seven...
Article
Educational tools claiming to use “right-brain techniques” are increasingly shaping school curricula. By implying a strong scientific basis, such approaches appeal to educators who rightly believe that knowledge of the brain should guide curriculum development. However, the notion of hemisphericity (idea that people are “left-brained” or “right-bra...
Article
Rutherford and Lindell (2011) review the theoretical and empirical research conceptualizing emotion and emotional processing within an approach-avoidance framework. This is accompanied by an extensive discussion of the cerebral lateralization of approach-avoidance. Berntson, Norman, and Cacioppo (2011) extend this discussion by presenting a bivaria...
Article
Two core motivational systems have been conceptualized as underlying emotion and behavior. The approach system drives the organism toward stimuli or events in the environment, and the avoidance system instead deters the organism away from these stimuli or events. This approach—avoidance dichotomy has been central to theories of emotion. Advances in...
Article
The popular notion that “there's no accounting for taste” reflects a widely held belief that aesthetic preferences are inherently unpredictable. Yet a growing body of research suggests that subjective art appreciation is amenable to objective scientific investigation. This paper reviews the state of the art in the science of art research, examining...
Article
Full-text available
Whether humans spontaneously sound out words in their mind during silent reading is a matter of debate. Some models of reading postulate that skilled readers access the meaning directly from print but others involve print-to-sound transcoding mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that silent reading activates the sound form of words before accessin...
Article
The biological basis of creativity remains a topic of contention. A long-held view suggests that whereas the left hemisphere is intelligent and analytic, the right hemisphere is the source of all creativity. Consequently, activating the right hemisphere should enhance creative thinking, prompting a plethora of popular books hawking a right hemisphe...
Article
The human face expresses emotion asymmetrically. Whereas the left cheek is more emotionally expressive, the right cheek appears more impassive, hence the appropriate cheek to put forward depends on the circumstance. Nicholls, Clode, Wood, and Wood (1999, Proceedings of the Royal Society (Section B), 266, 1517-1522) demonstrated that people posing f...
Article
In the normal population the left hemisphere's predominance for language processing is well established. However, in disorders such as autism atypical patterns of hemispheric lateralisation are common. Given increasing recognition of the idea that autism represents a continuum, we investigated whether the reduced/absent hemispheric asymmetry for la...
Article
The right cerebral hemisphere has long been argued to lack phonological processing capacity. Recently, however, a sex difference in the cortical representation of phonology has been proposed, suggesting discrete left hemisphere lateralization in males and more distributed, bilateral representation of function in females. To evaluate this hypothesis...
Article
Although the definitive source of the left hemisphere's superiority for visual word recognition remains illusive, some argue that the left (LH) and right (RH) hemispheres engage different strategies during early perceptual processes involved in stimulus encoding. In particular, it is proposed that the LH treats a word as a unitary perceptual group...
Article
Rapid processing deficits have been the subject of much debate in the literature on specific language impairment (SLI). Hari and Renvall (2001) [Hari, R. & Renvall, H. (2001). Impaired processing of rapid stimulus sequences in dyslexia. Trends in cognitive sciences, 5, 525-532.] proposed that the source of this deficit can be attributed to sluggish...
Article
The verbal/nonverbal account of left and right hemisphere functionality is the prevailing dichotomy describing the cerebral lateralization of function. Yet the fact that the left hemisphere is the superior language processor does not necessarily imply that the right hemisphere is completely lacking linguistic ability. This paper reviews the growing...
Article
Full-text available
Schizophrenia and schizotypal personality have been linked to sinistrality as well as ambidextrality. The current study clarifies the relation between laterality and schizotypal personality by administering a battery of laterality questionnaires to measure hand, eye, ear, and foot preference in a group of 933 university students. To determine wheth...
Article
The cerebral hemispheres have been proposed to engage different word recognition strategies: the left hemisphere implementing a parallel, and the right hemisphere, a sequential, analysis. To investigate this notion, we asked participants to name words with an early or late orthographic uniqueness point (OUP), presented horizontally to their left (L...
Article
Divided visual-field research suggests that attentional factors may contribute to the left hemisphere's (LH) superiority for language processing. The LH's parallel recognition strategy, specialised for whole word encoding, is largely unaffected by the distribution of spatial attention. In contrast, the right hemisphere's (RH) serial, letter-by-lett...
Article
Full-text available
Words with an early or late orthographic uniqueness point and nonwords with an early or late orthographic deviation point were presented to the left, right, or both visual fields simultaneously. In Experiment 1, 20 participants made lexical decision judgements to horizontal stimulus presentations. In Experiment 2, a further 20 participants complete...
Article
Visual half field studies have repeatedly demonstrated the left hemisphere's superiority for language processing. Previous studies examined the effect of word length on bilateral and unilateral performance by comparing foveal and parafoveal presentations. The present study removed the potential confound of acuity by using parafoveal presentations f...
Conference Paper
Nicholls et al. (1999, Proc. Royal Soc. B, 266, 1517-1522) demonstrated that models turn their left or right cheeks when expressing or concealing emotion. respectively. This study examined whether emotionally expressive individuals are more likely to turn their left cheek when posing for a photograph than less emotionally expressive individuals. On...
Article
Nicholls et al. (1999, Proc. Royal Soc. B, 266, 1517-1522) demonstrated that models turn their left or right cheeks when expressing or concealing emotion, respectively. This study examined whether emotionally expressive individuals are more likely to turn their left cheek when posing for a photograph than less emotionally expressive individuals. On...
Article
Research, using composite facial photographs has demonstrated that left-left composites are more emotionally expressive than are right-right composites. The present study investigated whether hemifacial asymmetries in expression are apparent in photographs, that feature one side of the face more than the other. Photographs were taken of the models...
Article
Full-text available
Hemispheric asymmetries for tactile simultaneity judgments were investigated in 34 dextral adults. Pairs of vibrotactile stimuli with simultaneous or successive onsets were delivered unilaterally to the left or right hand. Participants made a forced-choice, bipedal response, indicating whether a stimulus was simultaneous or successive. The effect o...

Citations

... One topic not covered in our analysis is the content of IM campaigns, due to its diversity. Studies on this topic have diverse content as they analyze different content types (García-Rapp, 2017;Hughes et al., 2019), the influence of visual congruency (Argyris et al., 2020), the creativity of influencer content (Sette & Brito, 2020), and even the preference for the left side of the cheek (Messina & Lindell, 2020). We also did not include studies related to the language used (Packard & Berger, 2017), the integration of hashtags (Erz et al., 2018) and emojis (Ge & Gretzel, 2018), as well as the decisive role played by the posts' timing-as shown by some researchers (Topaloglu et al., 2017). ...
... У детей с РАС примерно в 70% случаев наблюдается коморбидность, т. е. одновременное проявление и других расстройств, и встает вопрос, чем обусловлено то или иное сочетание, является ли снижение показателей асимметрии в различных синдромах только дополнительным диагностическим биомаркером и стимулятором поиска генома, отвечающего за эти сочетания (Lindell, 2020). ...
... However, the two clusters did not exhibit significantly different public engagement. The existing literature reported that SM posts with human faces induced more engagement [60,61], but the present study cannot register a similar finding. The difference found in this study between clusters would be explained by the divergent modes of liking and commenting as reactions. ...
... Human faces express emotion asymmetrically with stronger expression exhibited on the left side of the face [9]. This is likely due to brain lateralization whereby stimuli processed in right brain hemisphere activate the left side of the body and vice versa [10]. ...
... This may stem from the common approach in the medical field where traits characterizing the majority are qualified as normal and those that deviate from this as abnormal. Hence many studies have looked at associations between atypical or left handedness and pathologies such as schizophrenia, dyslexia, ADHD, criminal behaviour and so on (e.g., Markou, Banu, & Papadatou-Pastou, 2017;Savopoulos & Lindell, 2018). However, a biologist would look at minorities in a completely different way. ...
... If this is the case, none of the priming conditions should impact the target processing, i.e., no facilitating effect should be found in the first two conditions. If the primes are successfully facilitating the target processing in such a short time, two questions arise: (1) can a robust identity priming effect (IPE) be found on L2 written words in late unbalanced Chinese-English bilinguals, and if so, is the performance of these bilinguals is the same or not as the native speaker of English and other languages (Forster and Davis, 1984;Bowers et al., 1998;Stark and McClelland, 2000;Zeelenberg et al., 2004;Castles et al., 2007;Savopoulos and Lindell, 2018), (2) do the transposed-letter non-words facilitate the recognition of targets in comparison with the substituted-letter non-words as previous studies have repeatedly displayed (Bruner and O'Dowd, 1958;Chambers, 1979;Perea and Lupker, 2004;Perea and Acha, 2009;Perea et al., 2012)? ...
... First, we sought to evaluate whether wearing a face mask impacts posing preferences with regard to the bias favoring three-quarter over frontal presentations, and within the former with regard to the bias in favor of three-quarter poses displaying the left over the right cheek. Both biases have been amply documented in the literature (Bruno & Bertamini, 2013;Bruno, Bertamini & Protti, 2015;Bruno, Bode & Bertamini, 2017;Lindell, 2017;Manovich, Ferrari & Bruno, 2017) and are generally interpreted as due to the right-hemispheric specialization for emotional expression (Nicholls, Clode, Wood & Wood, 2019; see also Zeng, Wang, Silveira et al, 2022). Second, we aimed at evaluating how face mask may impact on pictorial facial prominence, the ratio of the area occupied by the face to that occupied by the whole body. ...
... Atypical language lateralization, however, is more commonly observed in people with ASD than in the neurotypical population (Lindell and Hudry 2013;Lindell 2017). Indeed, some researchers write that 'autism is referred to as cerebral lateralization abnormality' (Dane and Balci 2007, p. 223), and a 'disorder(s) of cerebral specialization originating during the embryonic period' (de Lacy and King 2013, p. 555), arguing strongly that altered lateralization lies at the very heart of ASD. ...
... Because of the left-hemi face advantage for emotional expressions, the models should turn their "emotional" left cheek to others to broadly express emotions while they should hide it to conceal emotions. The left-cheek posing bias was replicated in laboratories (Harris & Lindell, 2011;Nicholls, Clode, Lindell, & Wood, 2002;Okubo et al., 2017) and in naturalistic settings (Bruno & Bertamini, 2013;Lindell, 2017aLindell, , 2017bOkubo, 2019). ...
... More precisely, the left side of the face was rated as more emotionally expressive and emotions were perceived more intense (see e.g., Sackeim et al., 1978;Zaidel et al., 1995;Nicholls et al., 2002;Jones et al., 2012;Lindell, 2013a,b;Low and Lindell, 2016). This is widely in accordance with findings that the left cheek is overrepresented in classical portraits, see e.g., Bruno and Bertamini (2013) and McManus and Humphrey (1973); but also see contrasting research by Lindell (2016) who worked on specific cases of art history (i.e., Vincent Van Gogh's work). However, there are still some contradictions about the lateralization of perceptual aspects (e.g., the perception of highercognitive variables), for example, see Burt and Perrett (1997) or Jones et al. (2012). ...