Anne Rankin Mahoney's research while affiliated with California State University, East Bay and other places

Publications (15)

Article
When race and gender intersect, understanding gendered power may be complicated. The authors first describe the historical context that serves as important background for understanding gender and power in heterosexual African American relationships. Then they show how family solidarity in the face of social injustices often overrides gender equalit...
Article
Sometimes therapists assume that gender equality is not relevant when working with couples from traditional cultures. This study of couples in Iran suggests more complexity. The authors identify a variety of views and practices regarding equality between men and women in relationships. Some aspired to traditional roles; others attempted to create m...
Article
Equality is related to relationship success, yet few couples achieve it. In this qualitative study, we examine how couples with children in two time cohorts (1982 and 2001) moved toward equality. The analysis identifies three types of couples: Postgender, gender legacy, and traditional. Movement toward equality is facilitated by: (a) Stimulus for c...
Article
Approaches to gender in therapy either reinforce or challenge existing gender differences and inequalities. The authors suggest a way to help clients move beyond gender constructions from the past. They argue that perceived gender differences are rooted in power differences that limit relational development for both women and men, and perpetuate un...
Article
This study examines how newly married couples respond to social-contextual factors which both encourage and inhibit marital equality. This analysis of in-depth interviews with 12 egalitarian heterosexual couples in their first year of marriage reveals that none of the couples fully meets the criteria for equal marriages defined in the study, althou...
Article
Marital therapists are regularly confronted with issues of equality and fairness when working with couples. This article examines the social-contextual factors that influence couples' negotations about these issues. A common solution for couples, "the myth of equality," is identified, together with the processes that maintain it. The role of the th...
Article
Feminist theorists are raising questions about assumptions still common in the fields of family and child development which are relevant to early childhood educators. This article discusses why content and pedagogy work together in feminist classrooms and reviews research on the stages that many students and instructors move through as they learn a...
Article
Individuals who are aging today experience a role-person misfit because expectations for an older-person role developed during an earlier time in history have persisted after the relevant social conditions have changed. Recent work by Turner and others, which emphasize the dynamic, interactive aspect of social roles, gives us tools to analyze how t...

Citations

... Heteronormative standards for what are deemed normal situates men and women in a hierarchal relationship that portrays masculinity as active and powerful, while femininity is illustrated as being subordinate to male sexuality (Jackson, 2006). Like gender, heteronormativity creates opposing structures of femininity and masculinity that support men's greater power and status (Mahoney & Knudson-Martin, 2009). It reaffirms that all romantic relationships are supposed to be heterosexual, where the man loves and courts the woman. ...
... Certain roles may become more salient as commitment increases, especially the role of being a mother (Katz-Wise, Priess, & Hyde, 2010). In looking at a woman's sense of identity, motherhood has greater salience and is more central to her identity than other roles, and this salience only strengthens the more time she spends in childcare responsibilities (Cowdery, Knudson-Martin, & Mahoney, 2009;Katz-Wise et al., 2010;Medina & Magnuson, 2009). For stay-at-home mothers, then, this role may become so dominant that when mothering responsibilities shift (e.g., when children become more involved in school and away from the family), there is a need to redefine their identity. ...
... But we need to ask: 'equal in what?' (Kelly 2010). In Western modern contexts, the declared and experienced equality is a carefully constructed myth, not only in relations with peers, but in intimate relationships as well (Knudson-Martin and Mahoney 2009). As many people continue to embody traditional gender, ethnic and religious identities, struggles for equality take place mostly in discursive field and are limited to the questions of recognition of difference; they are unsuccessful as long as reason and individuality are considered the only paths to empowerment (Hernando 2017). ...
... Looking at couples' communication behaviour more broadly, qualitative studies from the United States, Germany and the Netherlands found that couples or families with more egalitarian relationship outcomes tend to negotiate more fairly, openly, actively and repeatedly in order to introduce change into their relationships (Knudson-Martin & Mahoney, 1998, 2005. Less egalitarian couples or families use more friendly and avoiding tactics and tend to place responsibility on the wife (Knudson-Martin & Mahoney, 1998, 2005. ...
... The agentive component of the role-change theory coincides with the cognitive aspect of empowerment, which explains the GI effect on both children and seniors who share the same mental space. The structural component overlaps the institutional aspect of empowerment that underlies teacher-pupil relations within the educational framework of a school (Mahoney, 1994) These findings have important implications for educators. If children and seniors can be given opportunities to work together at the computer on an equal basis, the outcomes may be salutary for both. ...
... Children and childhood in view of feminism. There are some common assumptions that various philosophies of feminism have been sharing (Tong, 1989;Grant, 1993;Evans, 1995;Mahoney, 1996). One is that women's and men's positions in society are the result of social, not natural or biological, factors. ...
... In particular, hegemonic masculinity has weakened the position of women in patriarchal Muslim societies such as Iran. Men hold an unchallenged position of power that allows them to make decisions for themselves and the entire family (Moghadam, Knudson-Martin, & Mahoney, 2009). Therefore, women's freedom of movement is legally restricted by the need to obtain permission from their father or husband to travel domestically or abroad (Tavakoli & Mura, 2017). ...
... The findings are counter to LaTaillade's et al. (2000) findings that discrimination is associated with inter-partner hostility and less effective conversations. We speculate that given how many Black families prioritize family and child needs above individual and couple needs (Cowdery et al., 2009), irrespective of its possible negative associations with couple-level outcomes, perhaps discrimination experiences may bring couples together as parents. Overall, this profile's correlates suggest that both partners' similarly high and varied racial socialization practices may lead to a powerfully cohesive set of positive and negative experiences, beliefs and socialization strategies around race. ...
... However, power in therapy is also influenced by client factors, such as gender, communication ability, and interest in therapy (Knudson-Martin & Mahoney, 2009). The small body of research on therapists' interruption of clients in couple therapy indicates that therapists, regardless of gender, are more likely to interrupt female clients than male clients . ...
... Researchers have examined the frequency with which couples expressed various types of positive and negative communication and found that femininity was positively correlated with positive communications and negatively correlated with negative communications. Thus, overall, femininity was related to more effective communication between spouses [14]. ...