Anne Meyer's research while affiliated with American Institutes for Research and other places

Publications (10)

Article
In this article, Don Glass, Anne Meyer, and David H. Rose examine the intersection of arts education and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to inform the design of better art, curricula, and UDL checkpoints. They build a case for the contribution of the arts to expert learning across the affective, recognition, and strategic neural networks and ar...
Book
The print version is available through Amazon, etc. but a richer multimedia version (and one that is more accessible) is available freely at: http://udltheorypractice.cast.org/login
Article
For 12 years, the Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST) has researched use of technology to expand opportunities for diverse learners. Universal design principles drawn from architecture and product development are useful for developing effective educational tools that can accommodate students' varied recognition, strategic, and affective sy...
Article
Full-text available
This paper posits that when new technologies in education move beyond their initial stages of development, innovations in curriculum design, teaching strategies, and policies will be driven by the needs of students "at the margin," those for whom present technologies are least effective, students with disabilities, and that all students will be the...
Article
Discusses ways in which technology in the classroom is bound to affect both what and how language arts is taught, as well as the very culture of schooling. Places technological innovations within a historical context and provides a hopeful picture for the future. (RS)

Citations

... Universal design for learning extends universal design (King-Sears, 2009). Whereas universal design aims at creating inclusive environments and has its roots in engineering sciences, universal design for learning aims at designing, creating, and delivering inclusive learning and teaching practices and content that address the idiosyncratic needs of all students within educational settings, including those with learning disabilities (Hitchcock et al., 2002;Pisha & Coyne, 2001). Therefore, universal design for learning serves as the framework to support inclusive education by providing all students with multiple means of accessing the curriculum and other learning materials and multiple means of communicating their knowledge and skills (Katz, 2013;Rose, 2000). ...
... Without quality and purposeful planning, the arts have minimal connection to academic activities and are often included as an afterthought or to fill time in the classroom. When extensive training and planning are included in the arts integration process, then student engagement is more likely and the connections to academics and real-life are endless (Glass, Meyer & Rose, 2013). ...
... This framework requires teachers to change how they view the teaching-learning procedure and initially approach lesson preparation and training for all learners. Teachers develop appropriate goal designs to address the needs of a wide range of students and implement instructional approaches responsive to specific differences (Rose & Meyer, 2002). ...
... [Insert Figure 2 here] The three post-unit assessments-including learning goal statements, evidence statements, tasks, rubrics, and student exemplar responses-were sent to external reviewers for commentary and the tasks were initially piloted in classrooms to determine the validity of the item quality (Harris et al., 2019). In addition, an equity and fairness framework (Rose & Meyer, 2006;Rose et al., 2005) was used to evaluate the approachability of the assessments for all students. ...
... While not specific necessarily to mothers as a general category, mothers, like all people, have differing access needs. Drawing upon principles of universal design for learning (UDL), which hold that there is no "normal" way to engage with learning materials so that materials should present multiple means of engagement (Hall et al., 2012), numerous scholars have increasingly pointed to the need to make digital materials more inclusive given their reliance on visuals (e.g., De Marsico et al., 2006;Rodriguez-Ascaso et al., 2018). There are simple design considerations that can be used to significantly increase the accessibility of some online content. ...
... Although this model has a long-standing history, other models have developed in response to it. The functional or interactional model suggests that individuals' environments can be arranged to either facilitate individuals' capabilities or, instead, amplify limitations (Smart, 2009); this has influenced the development of advances in special education such as the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework (e.g., Meyer et al., 2014), which offers ways for teachers to re-think the activities and learning environments they create so as to fully include students with a wide range of learning strengths and needs. Some researchers (e.g., Ferri & Connor, 2010) employ a third model of disability, the social/sociopolitical model, which suggests that the notion of "disability" arises only when social structures are constructed in ways that emphasize difference, promote stigma, and facilitate discrimination. ...
... Each component of such a curriculum (objectives, methods, materials, and assessments) is expected to be designed to meet the needs of learners and provide the necessary flexibility while providing a reference point for any teacher who wishes to follow and implement UDL guidelines (Cooper et al., 2008;Mavrou & Symeonidou, 2014). In short, a flexible curriculum should be structured with specific instructional objectives, methods, resources, and appropriate assessment techniques that support and implement inclusive practices, such as UDL in the classroom (Hitchcock et al., 2005). ...
... Dynamic media application and instructional infusion in elementary and secondary settings has broad utility for a range of learners, furthering educational intensity while propelling learners within science, technolog, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education disciplines (Ernst & Clark, 2009). Documented benefits of digital media incorporation range from content comprehension and retention (Lippincott, 2002) to emergent literacies (Hisrich & Blanchard, 2009) to impact on overall school culture (Rose & Meyer, 1994). Expansive effectiveness of the use of dynamic learning tools for at-risk and underserved learners, as well as traditional learner groups, is well documented (Tettegah & Mayo, 2005). ...
... Recent publications have documented occupational risks in the heat and conclude that strategic planning and adapting mitigation strategies for the workers reduces the risk of heat strain and dehydration (Ioannou et al., 2021a,b;Piil et al., 2020;Piil et al., 2018). It is challenging to design a tool that can be used by a wide range of individuals, and to communicate the content without compromising the detailed quality behind it (Meyer and Rose, 2000;Steinfeld and Maisel, 2012;Story et al., 1998). If the information fed to the user is too cumbersome, they will not bother to use the tool. ...
... The positive views of the students about providing alternative content can be assessed within the context of flexibility. The universal learning design built on the idea of creating flexibility in the curriculum (Meo, 2008) recommends enabling the variety of expression for students during their performances through various learning tasks and using different presentation forms such as voice, text, and visual in transferring information in order to achieve flexibility (Meyer and Rose, 2006). In the system developed, the flexibility achieved through alternative content became a significant design component regarded positively by the students following the dynamic assessment. ...