Anna Plyushteva's research while affiliated with University of Oxford and other places

Publications (17)

Article
Full-text available
In Malate, a district of Manila, flooding is a frequent occurrence. This paper draws on in-depth interviews with Malate inhabitants to approach urban floods as more than discrete disastrous episodes which interfere with a pre-existing normality. The paper employs a Levebvrian conceptualisation of rhythm and entrainment, while also offering reflecti...
Article
In this paper, I reflect on some of the ethical dimensions of public engagement with geographic research. The paper draws on my recent experience of a project entitled ‘Not working from home,’ which sought to make visible the everyday experiences of essential workers during the COVID‐19 pandemic. The project was intended as a space for essential wo...
Article
Full-text available
This commentary reflects on the pandemic commute and its significance for, on one hand, engaging with the problematic category of essential work, and on the other, future geographical research on transport and mobilities. Drawing on essential workers’ contributions to the 'Not working from home' public engagement project, I outline some experiences...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the links between women’s un/safety and their night-time mobilities in Brussels, Belgium and Recife, Brazil. While the significance of women’s intersectional identities to the construction of fear and safety in urban space has been well documented in feminist urban geography, we argue that the lens of South-North comparison high...
Article
Full-text available
Several studies have argued that the effects of commuter stress spill into other domains of everyday life, including the workplace. However, the entanglements between commuter stress and the workplace are complex and multidirectional. Commuter stresses both shapes and is shaped by managerial policies, workplace social relations, and the negotiation...
Article
Full-text available
In most night-time cities, there is stark inequality of access to transport and mobility, along various lines including gender. In this paper, we examine the extent to which a new night-time public transport service reshapes genderrelated mobility inclusion and exclusion at night. We argue that research on gender and night-time mobility needs to fo...
Article
Academic texts on cycling research are expanding rapidly. A dominant theme among these is the use of infrastructure measures to assist promotion of cycling as part of a movement towards sustainable mobility. Physical infrastructure is currently posited as the primary key to unlock cycling’s potential as a primary mode of sustainable transport. Indi...
Chapter
This chapter builds on our previous research on cycling in Sofia, which examined the practices and affordances of travelling by bicycle in a post-socialist South-East European city (Barnfield and Plyushteva, 2016). By drawing attention to the situated, embodied, mundane and ambiguous elements of cycling, we sought to show how the bicycle acts as a...
Article
The importance of the tourism and hospitality sectors to the urban night and the economies of cities has been well-documented. However, commercialised night-time leisure as a timespace of work remains relatively underexplored. A greater understanding of bars, hotels, restaurants and clubs as workplaces as well as leisure destinations can contribute...
Article
As they go about everyday life, members of households negotiate complex arrangements around mobility and immobility, which continue to change over time. Mobility biographies research has made an important contribution to our understanding of these dynamics. At the same time, mobility biographies often rely on limited definitions of the household an...
Article
This paper examines the role played by a student-organized research conference in the age of research-led teaching and active learning. Drawing on our experiences of organizing two departmental conferences in Geography in March 2016 and March 2017, we begin to outline how institutional support and funding for student-led “Changemakers” projects can...
Article
Full-text available
In an experimental session entitled Co-Producing Mobilities held at the 2014 Royal Geographical Society-Institute of British Geographers Annual Conference, 20 mobility scholars travelled around London on foot, by bus and by Tube to investigate how mobilities could be considered co-produced. In this paper, 18 participants reflect on this collaborati...
Article
Full-text available
There are many ways of moving through a city. Cycling is one which has received considerable attention from urban scholars. Yet it has remained largely neglected within the burgeoning literature on the post-socialist urbanisms of Central and Eastern Europe. This paper uses a case study from Sofia, Bulgaria to address this gap in urban research. By...
Article
Full-text available
The car dependence of people living in contemporary cities is a major concern for policy makers, who often find it difficult to persuade people into more sustainable transport modes. By contrast, recent insights from neuroscience have shown that a broad spectrum of behaviors can become habitual and, thus, resistant to change. Here, we outline the p...

Citations

... Received 20 December 2021; Received in revised form 24 May 2022; Accepted 27 June 2022 cycling can take many forms including diverting cyclists onto quieter residential streets, painted road markings, priorities at intersections, and physically separated lanes exclusively for cyclists. Although the planning and implementation of such infrastructure improvements is part of an ongoing political process (Cox and Koglin, 2020), there is clear evidence that appropriate cycling infrastructure can foster a cycling culture and have a positive effect on the numbers of those using bicycles (Pucher et al., 2010;Pucher and Buehler, 2021). ...
... For many, the apprehension of close contact in urban space serves as an evaluation criterion for everyday safety [42,55]. A preference for greater interpersonal distances is also evident for those suffering from anxiety disorders, commonly assumed to an avoidance of social interactions entirely [56]. ...
... Currently, the construction of roundabouts that do not recognize bicycle traffic as a separate category represent a priority, while the construction and marking of new bicycle paths and lanes is still not on the agenda of the city officials. Consequently, the traffic safety of cyclists has not increased and the expected popularization is slow, leading to problems already recognized in many other cities: an apparent gap between declarative cycling promotion and actual policies and ongoing planning practice, conditioned by different political settings and a power (im)balance (Plyushteva and Barnfield, 2020); the prioritization of the concept of motorized traffic (Koglin and Rye, 2014); and the promotion of the 'utility' transport model, resulting in the marginalization of cycling (Koglin and Rye, 2014;Aldred, 2015). However, the construction of a third-generation public bicycle system with associated terminals has improved the general impression of this type of alternative transport in Banjaluka. ...
... In the quest development of the built environment to ensure the safety of cyclists, it is essential to recognise that this development and initiatives will not just make people cycle but by changing the existing narrative of Cycling. This notion was further reiterated by Barnfield & Plyushteva (2020) study on navigating cycling infrastructure in Sofia, Bulgaria. As Morgan (2020) noted in exploring the cultural politics of infrastructure in Johannesburg, South Africa, there should be rationality in planning and an emotional connection with Cycling and cyclists, and this suggests that the notion of 'build it, and they will come' (Cervero et al., 2013) may not be applicable unless there is proper education and awareness about the prospects of Cycling as a sustainable mode of transportation. ...
... In addition, since women tend to have multiple attached roles, they are more likely to undertake multipurpose and chained trips than men (Mahadevia & Advani, 2016). Furthermore, they are more sensitive to traffic congestion, overcrowded buses, and the risk of harassment (Plyushteva & Boussauw, 2020). ...
... In fact, speaking of the "nighttime city" is to put on the table the range of issues associated with the governance of the urban night (Cibin, 2021;Seijas & Milan Gelders, 2021;van Liempt et al., 2015); but also formal and informal economies, employment and labour, commercial and underground cultures, "old" and "new" forms or urban and metropolitan mobility, pollution, and safety at evening and nighttime hours (e.g. Brands et al., 2015;Nofre & Eldridge, 2018;Shaw, 2018;Henckel, 2019;Plyushteva, 2019;Yeo, 2019). ...
... Within-family relationships as well as those within and between generations deserve much more attention than has hitherto been the case (e.g. Plyushteva and Schwanen, 2018). ...
... Working in partnership is a non-trivial challenge within HE, particularly with regard to identity, the imbalances in power, and the associated issues of ownership and expertise (Bovill, 2019;Cook-Sather et al., 2014;Healey et al., 2014;Hill et al., 2016;Matthews et al., 2019;Moore-Cherry et al., 2016;Seale et al., 2015;Thorogood et al., 2018). This study uncovers some of the challenges of working with students as co-researchers and beneficial insights that this approach brings to disability studies and inclusive education. ...
... Three of those agreed to record their regular walks over a full week using a light-weight video-camera that can be attached to clothing (Pink, 2007). Those second and third stages are the subject of other work not discussed here (and see Anderson, 2004;But- ler, 2007;Cook et al., 2016;Middleton, 2010;Pink, 2012). ...
... Malý et al. 2020;Stanilov 2007;Sýkora 1999;Sýkora -Bouzarovski 2012). The most important processes transforming post-socialist public space are the erosion of public ownership and related massive privatisation and commercialisation (Barnfield -Plyushteva 2016;Hirt 2014). New shops, services and start-ups began to emerge, although the pre-socialist quarters with smaller parcels of land and buildings were able to adapt to the new conditions more easily than the areas built in the socialist period (Stanilov 2007). ...