Angela Valeo's research while affiliated with Ryerson University and other places

Publications (6)

Article
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This study investigated the implementation of a full-day kindergarten programme in Ontario, Canada. Key to the implementation of this programme has been a new kind of educator team consisting of a certified teacher and a registered early childhood educator and a complementary partnership in which each team member contributes equally. Our research e...
Article
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The authors are associate professors in the School of Early Childhood Studies, Ryerson University. Kathryn Underwood's research interests include early childhood social policy, disability as identity, and inclusive practice in early childhood education and care settings. Aurelia Di Santo researches children's rights, children's participation in res...
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This study examines the efficacy of engaging young children with disabilities in interviews to elicit their perspectives on their own capabilities. Using the theoretical framework of the capability approach, the authors investigated the efficacy of different interview techniques to engage young children with disabilities in research about their cap...
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This paper examines Special Education Tribunals, in Ontario, Canada through a Luhmannian theoretical lens. At total of 58 Special Education Tribunal summary hearings were analyzed using the constant comparative method through NVivo software. The results revealed that these Tribunals appear to favour the assessment testimony of teachers and other sc...
Article
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Attention deficit disorder and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders (ADD/ADHD) are found in approximately 5% to 10% of school-aged children. This study examined whether childhood physical abuse was associated with ADD/ADHD. Data were derived from a population-based sample of 13,054 adults from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey. We used...
Article
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This article explores the application of current discourse in inclusive education, particularly the Capability Approach and its utility in early childhood education. The article highlights the tensions between a rights-based discourse that informs inclusive education practice and the right for children to have early intervention. Structural approac...

Citations

... Although it is beyond the scope of this paper to report on the interprofessional collaboration of FDK teachers and ECEs, this model had been tested in ear- lier work over 10 years (Corter & Pelletier, 2010;Corter et al., 2012;Pelletier, 2012). While challenges continue to exist in unequal working conditions and rate of pay in the FDK model (Gananathan, 2011;Langford, Santo, Valeo, Underwood, & Lenis, 2016), there are many benefits for 64 (24%) 7 (2%) Note. Values are M ± SD or n (%). ...
... Full-day kindergarten classrooms in Ontario are co-taught by one certified teacher and one registered early childhood educator (ECE). ECEs are educators who specialize in working with young children and focus on planning developmentally appropriate programs to promote students' physical, social, emotional, and cognitive well-being (Underwood, Di Santo, Valeo, & Langford, 2016). Classrooms followed a new provincial Kindergarten Program that mandates play-based instruction (OME, 2016b) as well as a new provincial assessment policy (OME, 2016a). ...
... Beyond demographic factors, there are also numerous forms of adversity that may confound the relationship between ADHD and CMH, such as adverse childhood experiences and low socioeconomic status. ACEs, such as physical abuse, sexual abuse, and witnessing domestic violence, are more prevalent among those with ADHD in comparison to those without ADHD (Fuller-Thomson et al., 2014;Fuller-Thomson et al., 2016b). ACEs are also negatively associated with achieving CMH, as early childhood experiences can have implications for mental health outcomes across the life course (Baiden & Fuller-Thomson, 2016). ...
... Nussbaum [39], on the other hand, argues the case for a universal, cross-cultural list of central capabilities for human flourishing, even one that is provisional and open to debate, and identifies ten central human capabilities that would need to be present for a fully good human life. Others develop this further, by creating a capabilities index specifically for children, pointing out that a person's capabilities may be compromised by decisions made on behalf of that person, specifically, young children (e.g., [40]). Walshe et al. [41] identify a list of 11 capabilities emerging from literature: senses, imagination and thought; autonomy; affiliation; emotions; mental wellbeing; religion and identity; play; bodily integrity and safety; bodily health; life; and other species (after Nussbaum [39]; Biggeri [42]; Di Tommaso [43]; Addabbo, Tommaso and Facchinetti [44]; Sen [27]). ...
... 3. See also King and Thornhill (2003, p. 17 ff.); Valentinov and Pies (2018); Valeo and Underwood (2015). 4. See Lachman (2013, p. 8). 5. See also Spruyt (2017, p. 89 ff). ...
... Equitable and inclusive forms of children's participation in early childhood settings are more specifically discussed in the literature in terms of equity (Eriksen, 2018;Moss, 2017; Gunn, Surtees, Gordon-Burns & Purdue, 2020), social justice (Kessler & Swadener, 2019), anti-bias education (Vandenbroeck, 2007) and meaningful inclusion (Mackenzie, Cologon & Fenech, 2016;Underwood, Valeo & Wood, 2012). In the work Mackey and Lockie (2012) conducted, the equitable and inclusive dimensions of active participation were separate and had definitions that were distinct from one another. ...