Angela Bosco-Lauth's research while affiliated with Colorado State University and other places

Publications (32)

Article
Introduction: E-cigarette vaping is a major aspect of nicotine consumption, especially for children and young adults. An acute vaping model has not been demonstrated in the hamster, which has the unique benefit of becoming infected with and transmitting respiratory viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, without genetic alteration. Methods: Using a two-d...
Preprint
Introduction E-cigarette vaping has become a major portion of nicotine consumption, especially for children and young adults. Although it is branded as a safer alternative to cigarette smoking, murine and rat models of sub-acute and chronic e-cigarette vaping exposure have shown many pro-inflammatory changes in the respiratory tract. An acute vapin...
Preprint
Full-text available
COVID-19 results in increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, but inflammation-targeting clinical trials have yielded poor to mixed results. Our studies of other disorders with an inflammatory component, including Alzheimer’s disease, chemobrain, Down syndrome, normal aging, and West Nile Virus infection, showed that treatment with the ‘pro-i...
Article
Full-text available
Coccidioidomycosis is a significant health problem of dogs and humans in endemic regions, especially California and Arizona in the U.S. Both species would greatly benefit from a vaccine to prevent this disease. A live avirulent vaccine candidate, Δcps1, was tested for tolerability and efficacy to prevent pulmonary coccidioidomycosis in a canine cha...
Preprint
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SARS-CoV-2 spillback from humans into domestic and wild animals has been well-documented. We compared variants of cell culture-expanded SARS-CoV-2 inoculum and virus recovered from four species following experimental exposure. Five nonsynonymous changes in nsp12, S, N and M genes were near fixation in the inoculum, but reverted to wild-type sequenc...
Article
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The inability to communicate how infectious diseases are transmitted in human environments has triggered avoidance of interactions during the COVID-19 pandemic. We define a metric, Effective ReBreathed Volume (ERBV), that encapsulates how infectious pathogens, including SARS-CoV-2, transport in air. ERBV separates environmental transport from other...
Preprint
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Wild animals have been implicated as the origin of SARS-CoV-2, but it is largely unknown how the virus affects most wildlife species and if wildlife could ultimately serve as a reservoir for maintaining the virus outside the human population. Here we show that several common peridomestic species, including deer mice, bushy-tailed woodrats, and stri...
Article
Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) first emerged in Maine in the early 2000s and resulted in an epizootic outbreak in 2009. Since 2009, serum samples from cervids throughout Maine have been collected and assessed for the presence of neutralizing antibodies to EEEV to assess EEEV activity throughout the state. We tested 1,119 Odocoileus virgin...
Preprint
Full-text available
The inability to communicate how infectious diseases are transmitted in human environments has triggered avoidance of interactions during the COVID-19 pandemic. We define a metric, Effective ReBreathed Volume (ERBV), that encapsulates how infectious pathogens transport in air. This measure distinguishes environmental transport from other factors in...
Preprint
Full-text available
The pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 has reached nearly every country in the world with extraordinary person-to-person transmission. The most likely original source of the virus was spillover from an animal reservoir and subsequent adaptation to humans sometime during the winter of 2019 in Wuhan Province, China. Because of its genetic similarity to SA...
Article
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Background The preferred efficacy design for licensing a vaccine for animal use (United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)) is a prospective, placebo-controlled, randomized, and double-blinded vaccination-challenge trial. In such studies, each subject receives the same exposure to the virulent pathogen by active challenge. To test a cps1, live...
Article
Brucellosis, caused by Brucella abortus, has been eliminated from livestock in the US. Remaining wildlife reservoirs are the bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus canadensis) populations in Yellowstone National Park and the surrounding area, from which there is periodic exposure and transmission to surrounding livestock herds. Elk account for nearly...
Article
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The N-linked glycosylation motif at amino acid position 154-156 of the envelope (E) protein of West Nile virus (WNV) is linked to enhanced murine neuroinvasiveness, avian pathogenicity and vector competence. Naturally occurring isolates with altered E protein glycosylation patterns have been observed in WNV isolates; however, the specific effects o...
Poster
Full-text available
Feral swine (Sus scrofa) are an invasive and substantially destructive species within the United States. Initially introduced in the 1500s by early settlers, these mammals have since expanded their range to include at least 35 U.S. states, with an estimated national population of at least 6 million individuals as of 2018. Contributing to their succ...
Article
Full-text available
USDA APHIS Wildlife Services (WS) responded to the recognized threat of feral swine as a pathogen reservoir as early as 2004 through opportunistic sampling of animals harvested by its operational component to curtail swine damage to agriculture and property. Initially, pseudorabies and swine brucellosis were of most concern, as both serve as a pote...
Article
Most natural West Nile virus (WNV) infections in humans and horses are subclinical or sub-lethal and non-encephalitic. Yet, the main focus of WNV research remains on the pathogenesis of encephalitic disease, mainly conducted in mouse models. We characterized host responses during subclinical WNV infection in horses and compared outcomes with those...
Article
Full-text available
West Nile virus (WNV) is one of the most common causes of epidemic viral encephalitis in horses worldwide. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are amongst the first to encounter the virus following a mosquito bite. This study aimed to elucidate the transcription kinetics of cytokine, Toll-like receptor (TLRs) and TLRs-associated genes follow...
Article
Full-text available
West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-transmitted member of the Flaviviridae family that has emerged in recent years to become a serious public health threat. Given the sporadic nature of WNV epidemics both temporally and geographically, there is an urgent need for a vaccine that can rapidly provide effective immunity. Protection from WNV infection i...
Data
Induction of WN-80E Specific Antibodies in Serum Following Two Injections With WN-80E. Serum antibody titers were determined by ELISA 21 days following a boost immunization with WN-80E in combination with adjuvants. Titers of Total IgG (A), IgG1 (B) and IgG2c (C) were determined for all mice (n = 5/group). Similar levels of Total IgG and IgG1 were...
Data
Protective Adjvuants Induce a Th1 CD4+ T-Cell response following a single immunization. Mice (n = 5/group) were immunized with WN-80E (1 μg/dose) in combination with the indicated adjuvants. 7 days following a single immunization, splenocytes were isolated and phenotyped by ICS. SLA-SE which is shown to reduce serum virus titer in challenge studies...
Article
Full-text available
West Nile virus (WNV) has been maintained in North America in enzootic cycles between mosquitoes and birds since it was first described in North America in 1999. House sparrows (HOSPs; Passer domesticus) are a highly competent host for WNV that have contributed to the rapid spread of WNV across the U.S.; however, their competence has been evaluated...
Article
Over the last years West Nile virus (WNV) lineage 2 has spread from the African to the European continent. This study was conducted to demonstrate efficacy of an inactivated, lineage 1-based, WNV vaccine (Equip(®) WNV) against intrathecal challenge of horses with a recent isolate of lineage 2 WNV. Twenty horses, sero-negative for WNV, were enrolled...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract We describe the isolation of West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) from blood of a Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) collected in northwestern Missouri in August 2012. Sequencing determined that the virus was related to lineage 1a WNV02 strains. We discuss the role of wildlife in WNV disease epidemiology.
Article
Full-text available
A single helicase amino acid substitution, NS3-T249P, has been shown to increase viremia magnitude/mortality in American crows (AMCRs) following West Nile virus (WNV) infection. Lineage/intra-lineage geographic variants exhibit consistent amino acid polymorphisms at this locus; however, the majority of WNV isolates associated with recent outbreaks...
Article
Full-text available
Ardeid birds and pigs are known as major amplifying hosts for Japanese encephalitis virus, and ducklings and chickens have been considered to play at best a minor role in outbreaks because of their low or absent viremia. We hypothesized that viremia of sufficient magnitude would develop in young ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos) and chicks (Gallus gal...
Chapter
Bats have been identified as the reservoir host for a number of high-impact zoonotic viruses that induce highly lethal disease in man and domestic animals. Most bats are highly social, often living in communal roosts where thousands of individuals come into contact daily. Once a colony has contracted a virus, or any transmissible pathogen, it is ne...
Article
Full-text available
Powassan virus and its subtype, deer tick virus, are closely related tick-borne flaviviruses that circulate in North America. The incidence of human infection by these agents appears to have increased in recent years. To define exposure patterns among white-tailed deer, potentially useful sentinels that are frequently parasitized by ticks, we scree...
Article
Full-text available
A novel bacterium-free approach for rapid assembly of flavivirus infectious cDNAs using circular polymerase extension reaction was applied to generate infectious cDNA for the virulent New South Wales isolate of the Kunjin strain of West Nile virus (KUNV) that recently emerged in Australia. Recovered virus recapitulated the genetic heterogeneity pre...

Citations

... Not surprisingly, the above treatments have not been approved for seriously ill patients in the ICU. In contrast, experimentally applied recombinant GM-CSF [40] in SARS-CoV-2 infected mice significantly improved survival. It has also been established that the autoantibodies against GM-CSF, which regulate the differentiation and activation of granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells [41], can seriously damage responses to infection. ...
... These encouraging findings led the investigative team, in partnership with Anivive Lifesciences, to initiate a program to develop a clinically useful vaccine for dogs and a vaccine/challenge study was performed [63]. Thirty young adult male and female beagle/beagle mix dogs were vaccinated SC twice 4 weeks apart with 10,000, 50,000 or 100,000 arthroconidia, or 100,000 arthroconidia only once, or saline as a control (n = 6/group). ...
... Threonine at position 501 was previously shown to increase the binding affinity of the S protein with the human ACE2 receptor (Starr et al., 2020;Welkers et al., 2021). Perhaps this substitution may contribute to the virus's adaptation to efficiently bind to ferret and mink ACE2 (Bashor et al., 2021). ...
... Pei et al. (2021) reported that buoyancy-driven flow regime led to a longer transmission distance and elevated exposure to viral aerosols than did the mixing airflow. According to Bond et al. (2021), particle size drives its transport, deposition onto surfaces, and elimination by mitigation measures. ...
... Moreover, co-infections of species-specific coronaviruses and SARS-CoV-2 might lead to novel chimeric viruses (Focosi and Maggi 2022;Banerjee et al. 2020;Boniotti et al. 2016). Until now, experimental studies showed that raccoons are not susceptible to SARS-CoV-2, since challenged animals did not develop clinical symptoms nor shed virus genomes or infectivity (Francisco et al. 2021;Bosco-Lauth et al. 2021). Nonetheless, a variety of factors that are difficult to simulate in experimental studies such as coinfections, immunodeficiencies, gestation, senescence, parasitic burdens, and environmental conditions may also contribute to their susceptibility. ...
... Human cases have expanded northward into northern New England for the first time when the disease struck NH in 2005 followed by VT in 2012 and ME in 2014 Andreadis 2013, Lindsey et al. 2018). Other evidence for northward expansion is supported by the recent detection of virus in mosquitoes, antibodies from wildlife (moose and deer), and veterinary cases (emus and horses) from this region (Lubelczyk et al. 2013, Saxton-Shaw et al. 2015, Kenney et al. 2020. Disease outbreaks are also increasing in frequency in established foci in southern New England and NY in recent decades. ...
... One of the most important wildlife species for FAD surveillance in the United States are wild pigs (Sus scrofa), commonly referred to as feral swine (Brown et al., 2020a). Wild pigs pose a significant disease risk to animal agriculture with the potential of 87% of World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) listed swine pathogens potentially causing disease in livestock. ...
... Similar to animal infections reported worldwide, animals with exposure to human COVID-19 cases in the United States have been found to be permissive for SARS-CoV-2 infection and viral replication in some situations, after close contact with humans. SARS-CoV-2 so far has been shown to replicate poorly in these animal species, with the exception of mink (Bosco-Lauth et al., 2020;Shi et al., 2020;Oude Munnink et al., 2021). Natural SARS-CoV-2 infection of birds, horses, cattle and camelids has not been recorded (USDA, 2021). ...
... Some of the live attenuated candidates include ΔT (also known as Δcts2/ard1/cts3) [83,100,114] and ΔCPS1 [81,115]. Dr. Lisa Shubitz and colleagues are Curr Clin Micro Rpt developing ΔCPS1 as a vaccine candidate to prevent infection due to C. posadasii in dogs [116]. Many studies have identified protective antigens (Pep1, Plb, Amn1, Ag2/Pra, Cs-Ag, Pmp1, Prp2, Ure, and Gel1) that could be used in a recombinant protein vaccine [117][118][119][120][121][122][123][124][125]. ...
... In this sense, it was reported that E glycosylation was related to efficient virus transmission by Cx. vectors [11]. However, more recent studies have shown that the competence of Cx. vectors is not affected by N-linked glycosylation of the E protein, but by amino acid polymorphisms, which also affect avian competence [52]. In fact, strain WN02, characterized by a single amino acid change in protein E, which displaced strain NY99 after its initial outbreak in the US, is transmitted more efficiently by species of the genus Cx [53]. ...