Andrew Miles's research while affiliated with University of Toronto and other places

Publications (13)

Article
Full-text available
Prosocial acts can increase positive emotions and contribute to emotional well-being, but it is unclear whether other types of moral behavior have similar effects. Respondents from a large online sample (N = 1783) were randomly assigned to recall recent instances when they had performed moral, self-indulgent, or routine acts. Those who recalled sel...
Article
Full-text available
Background The COVID-19 pandemic, the accompanying lockdown measures, and their possible long-term effects have made mental health a pressing public health concern. Acts that focus on benefiting others-known as prosocial behaviors-offer one promising intervention that is both flexible and low cost. However, neither the range of emotional states pro...
Article
Full-text available
Scholars have argued that prosocial behavior produces positive emotions because it fulfills basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. These explanations have largely neglected morality, despite the fact that prosocial behaviors are widely considered to be moral. To determine whether seeing oneself as acting morally—moral...
Article
Personal values have been shown to shape consequential social beliefs and behaviors in cultures around the world, but relatively little is known about how they develop. Schwartz argues that personal values form as individuals are exposed to social institutions which are themselves informed by cultural values and other macro-level forces. An importa...
Preprint
Sociologists increasingly use insights from dual-process models to explain how people think and act. These discussions generally emphasize the influence of cultural knowledge mobilized through automatic cognition, or else show how the use of automatic and deliberate processes vary according to the task at hand or the context. Drawing on insights fr...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic, the accompanying lockdown measures, and their possible long-term effects have made mental health a pressing public health concern. Acts that focus on benefiting others—known as prosocial behaviors—offer one promising intervention that is both flexible and low cost. However, neither the range of emotional states prosocial acts...
Article
Dual-process models are increasingly popular in sociology as a framework for theorizing the role of automatic cognition in shaping social behavior. However, empirical studies using dual-process models often rely on ad hoc measures such as forced-choice surveys, observation, and interviews whose relationships to underlying cognitive processes are no...
Article
Full-text available
Growing older often brings hardship, adversity, and even trauma. Resilience is a broad term used to describe flourishing despite adversity. To date, resilience and the connections to religion have not been well studied, despite compelling evidence that religious practice can promote psychological health. This research examines the role that religio...
Article
Most research on moral identities conceptualizes morality exclusively in terms of care and justice, but work from across the social sciences indicates that these represent only a corner of the moral landscape. Emphasizing care and justice alone severely restricts the scope of moral identity models, and risks under-estimating the influence of moral...
Article
Full-text available
Studies using data from the United States suggest religious organizational involvement is more beneficial for health than secular organizational involvement. Extending beyond the United States, we assess the relative impacts of religious and secular organizational involvement on self-rated health cross-nationally, accounting for national-level reli...

Citations

... For instance, recent studies have demonstrated that students engaging in more prosocial acts reported high levels of relatedness satisfaction at school [22,34]. In addition, Miles and Upenieks [35] found that prosocial behavior is only positively associated with relatedness needs satisfaction and not significantly related to autonomy and competence needs. These findings have supported the bidirectional effect between need satisfaction and prosocial behavior. ...
... including whether or not to recycle, or whether or not to donate a small amount for environmental causes when opportunities arise as part of routine activities. To an extent, our design decision to ask comprehension check questions and restrict the analytical sample to those who have fully understood the text on a first try may have resulted in more calculated (and potentially less externally valid) decisions 25 . This observation is particularly important for future experimental work and requires further investigation. ...
... Neste sentido, o comportamento pró-social, definido como atos positivos em relação ao outro ou sociedade que promovam ou que tenham a intenção de bem-estar (Pfattheicher et al., 2022), pode apresentar efeitos positivos nas dimensões físicas e emocionais dos sujeitos e, consequentemente, atuar como um fator protetivo para a ocorrência de transtornos mentais como a depressão (Miles et al., 2021). Dentre os diversos comportamentos que favorecem a pró- (Barros et al., 2020). ...
... See studies such as Proyer et al. [85] and Manthey et al. [86] for similar correlations using different time frames. We expected a 30% attrition rate after baseline which means that we planned to sample 360/0.7 = 514 per condition [87]. ...
... The wide array of countries included in the World Values Survey provide a unique opportunity to examine the role of the national religious context, defined in this study by religious pluralism, a measure of country-level religious diversity. Greater religious pluralism has been found to lower trust (Dingermans & Van Ingen, 2015;Olson & Li, 2015), though higher religious pluralism in a country is generally associated with better health (Lu & Yang, 2020;May & Smilde, 2016;Upenieks et al., 2018). ...
... Sociologists of morality too stand to benefit from moral markets scholarship. Recent empirical work among sociologists of morality tend to focus on the associations of morality with non-economic phenomena, such as the political realm, the family, volunteering and religiosity (e.g., Vaisey and Miles 2014;Miles 2015;Miles and Upenieks 2018). Insights from the moral markets literature add complexity to this field which frequently focuses on the moral underpinnings of charity (generally deemed to be "good") or cheating ("bad"), for example. ...
... Such evidence could contribute to determining suitable pathways to increase religious service attendance or identifying barriers that impede more regular religious service attendance, particularly among those who positively self-identify with a religious/spiritual tradition and subpopulations (e.g., older adults) for whom the benefits of religious services attendance might be especially pronounced. For example, advancing age is often accompanied by hardships in various domains of life, including physical (e.g., functional limitations), social (e.g., loss of loved ones), and emotional (e.g., grief) afflictions [32]. Religious service attendance can provide older adults with opportunities to access, ...