Andrew J Cathcart's research while affiliated with University of Glasgow and other places

Publications (22)

Article
Full-text available
Laboratory-based studies have demonstrated that adding protein (PRO) to a carbohydrate (CHO) supplement can improve thermoregulatory capacity, exercise performance and recovery. However, no study has investigated these effects in a competitive sporting context. This study assessed the effects of combined CHO-PRO supplementation on physiological res...
Article
The ventilatory (V' E) mechanisms subserving stability of alveolar and arterial PCO2 (PACO2, PaCO2) during moderate exercise (< lactate threshold, thetaL) remain controversial. As long-term modulation has been argued to be an important contributor to this control process, we proposed that subjects with no experience of cycling (NEx) might provide i...
Article
The physical requirements for women soccer players appear to be similar to those for men, with high levels of aerobic capacity, sprint speed and recovery being fundamental for success (Krustrup et al. Med Sci Sports Exerc 37: 1242-1248, 2005). Specific interventions designed to improve training status in male soccer players have been assessed in se...
Article
The physiological equivalents of the curvature constant (W') of the high-intensity power-duration (P-t(LIM)) relationship are poorly understood, although they are presumed to reach maxima/minima at exhaustion. In an attempt to improve our understanding of the determinants of W', we therefore aimed to determine its recovery kinetics following exhaus...
Article
The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of very high intensity sprint interval training (SIT) on metabolic and vascular risk factors in overweight/obese sedentary men. Ten men (age, 32.1 ± 8.7 years; body mass index, 31.0 ± 3.7 kg m(-2)) participated. After baseline metabolic, anthropometric, and fitness measurements, participants comp...
Article
Intermittent supra-maximal cycling of varying work: recovery durations was used to explore the kinetics of respiratory compensation for the metabolic acidosis of high-intensity exercise (> lactate threshold, thetaL). For a 10:20s duty-cycle, blood [lactate] ([L-]) was not increased, and there was no evidence of respiratory compensation (RC); i.e, n...
Article
A recent bout of high-intensity exercise can alter the balance of aerobic and anaerobic energy provision during subsequent exercise above the lactate threshold (theta(L)). However, it remains uncertain whether such "priming" influences the tolerable duration of subsequent exercise through changes in the parameters of aerobic function [e.g., theta(L...
Article
To investigate the kinetics of O2 uptake (VO2) and m. vastus lateralis [deoxyhemoglobin] ([Hb]) (near-infrared spectroscopy) for supramaximal intermittent cycling. Six males performed a ramp test for determination of VO2peak and lactate threshold. On different days, they completed four intermittent "work:recovery" tests (10 s:20 s, 30 s:60 s, 60 s:...
Article
The stability of arterial PCO(2) (P(a)CO(2)) during moderate exercise in humans suggests a CO(2)-linked control that matches ventilation (V(E)) to pulmonary CO(2) clearance (VCO(2)). An alternative view is that V(E) is subject to long-term modulation (LTM) induced by "hyperpnoeic history". LTM has been reported with associative conditioning via dea...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to investigate feedback control strategies for integration of electric motor assist and functional electrical stimulation (FES) for paraplegic cycling, with particular focus on development of a testbed for exercise testing in FES cycling, in which both cycling cadence and workrate are simultaneously well controlled and con...

Citations

... This is due to the repeated transitions from rest to exercise causing repeated changes in the ˙ VO 2 response, as reflected by a higher ˙ VO 2 average derivative. Few studies have focused on the quantifi- cation of the magnitude of change in the ˙ VO 2 signal during intermittent exercise (Combes, Dekerle, Bougault, & Daussin, 2016;Turner et al., 2006). In our study, the mean amplitude of the fluctuations (from lowest to highest point) is 1.48 L· min −1 and is similar to our previous work on similar population ( Combes et al., 2015). ...
... Previous studies comparing traditional aerobic modalities of exercise and resistance training-based HIIT have not clearly controlled intensity of effort (15,59). In addition, other studies investigating the effect of different exercise modes using HIIT often report only 1 physiological adaptation such as strength or aerobic fitness without assessing and comparing both (18,59). Improvements in both aerobic fitness in addition to strength and hypertrophy may be possible with a range of independent exercise modes as long as effort is high (22). ...
... Previous studies have analysed the effects of HIIT in individual exercise modes on a single mode of activity (Cook et al., 2010;Sijie et al., 2012). However, the effects of this training method in running or cycling on performance in a single mode such as running in female athletes has not been studied. ...
... Therefore, the aims of the current meta-analysis were to investigate the effects of selected dietary supplements on endurance performance in the heat, as well as the associated core temperature responses. The ergogenic effect of macronutrients [56][57][58] and eu/hyper-hydration [56,[59][60][61][62][63][64] on endurance exercise performance in the heat have been well-established and do not require revisiting here. However, the control of these factors among studies evaluating the efficacy of dietary supplements can be inconsistent, often precluding direct comparisons. ...
... A different approach has been taken by Cathcart and colleagues [174]. These investigators could discern no differences in the dynamic e response to moderate-intensity cycle-ergometer exercise, expressed as the slope and intercept of the linear e-co 2 relationship, or in mean P A co 2 as a surrogate of Paco 2 [54,55] in a group of individuals who were 'naive' to cycling (and therefore with no established cycling-exercise 'memory,' but otherwise physically active), relative to an ageand activity-matched control group. ...
... There is strong evidence that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) can be a feasible and powerful tool for improving CRF [40][41][42][43]. The literature review reveals that HIIT training is popular among older populations [44][45][46][47]; however, there are papers that integrate school-based programs for younger groups aged 6 to 10. Martinez-Visciano et al. [15] concluded that HIIT training improved the girls' CRF throughout one school year. ...
... Five studies were included for comparison, four of which were obtained from the Chorley and Lamb review: (Bartram et al., 2018), , (Ferguson et al., 2010), and (Caen et al., 2019). After the summary of Chorley and Lamb (2020) was published, Caen et al. (2021) published a study that investigated the W' reconstitution dynamics in even more detail and which was thus added to the list. ...
... Adaptive-based control methods involving switched dynamics have been recently introduced to compensate for model uncertainties and improve tracking performance using iterative learning Ghanbari et al. (2019), repetitive learning Duenas et al. (2019), and concurrent learning Casas et al. (2020) approaches. Power tracking controllers were designed to track predetermined desired torque trajectories using impedance and admittance techniques Chang et al. (2022); Cousin et al. (2019), Cousin et al. (2020) and a model-based feedback approach Hunt et al. (2004). However, existing power tracking controllers usually implement predetermined desired torque trajectories and thus are prone to experience degraded performance due to the timevarying muscle dynamics and fatigue. ...
... A low-cost strategy that can safely induce hypercapnia is by increasing the volume of external respiratory dead space such as by breathing through a tube (Hebisz et al., 2013;Khayat et al., 2003;Zatoń et al., 2010). According to numerous studies (Cathcart et al., 2005;Toklu et al., 2003), the added respiratory dead space (ARDS) supplemented by tube breathing increases the amount of CO 2 that is inspired in subsequent breaths proportional to the added volume. The retention of CO 2 induces a condition known as acute respiratory acidosis (Jones, 2008;Kraut and Madias, 2014). ...
... 33 Additionally, even when the TWD and interval work-to-rest ratio are held constant, longer interval durations increase the metabolic strain (ie, training stress). 34,35 As Renfree et al 32 point out, the manner in which a session is completed is potentially much more important than its TWD. In summary, neither construct nor criterion validity appear to have been established for TL metrics. ...