Anastasia Novkunskaya's research while affiliated with European University at Saint Petersburg and other places

Publications (15)

Article
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Since the 1990s, many countries have implemented healthcare reforms underlined by New Public Management principles and technological transformations. Although studies have examined these reforms from different viewpoints, the spatial implications of healthcare reforms have received limited attention. Scholarship focused predominantly on regional va...
Article
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This paper addresses the problem of infrastructural breaks in two systems—the funeral market and maternity care. The authors analytically problematize how dysfunctions in the operation of these infrastructures shape the experiences of funeral and childbirth in contemporary Russia. The authors propose the conceptual model of the ‘rite of passage’, s...
Article
This article explores emotional styles of Russian maternity hospitals and their recent changes. We focus on two emotional practices that characterise different emotional styles: the Soviet-associated emotional practice of khamstvo (rudeness) and the post-Soviet neoliberal practice of smiling. Emotional styles in healthcare in Russia have been trans...
Article
The purpose of this article is to place developments in welfare policy since 2012 in the context of the different models of welfare restructuring in Russia. We focus on President Vladimir Putin’s Decree No. 597, which set out to raise the salaries of doctors, teachers and other categories of public employees. We find that neoliberalism is deeply em...
Article
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While there is a substantive amount of literature on vulnerability of different kinds of patients in different settings, medical professionals are usually considered as the ones who possess power and gain a privileged position. In this paper, we aim to demonstrate that in a certain context physicians-a social group which is usually referred to as "...
Article
Maternity services in modern Russia are formally regulated and coordinated by decrees of the Ministry of Health, by orders of the regional authorities and by internal orders of medical institutions. However, formally homogeneous facility-based childbirth in Russia shows considerable differences in the way healthcare professionals interact with each...

Citations

... Through the act of ritual, spiritual knowledge becomes inscribed in the body, and in that sense, spirituality is always embodied. In their paper on funeral and birth rituals in Russia, Mokhov and Novkunskaya (2021) draw our attention to the importance of transmitting knowledge about "ritual fractures". Ritual fractures can be defined as challenges that exist in the infrastructure of the organization of a funeral or birth, such as issues with existing rules, legislation, or transport. ...
... The type of childbirth healthcare plan and support during labour seem to be more significant for a positive birth experience. Sadly, women's expectations and wishes concerning childbirth are often ignored by the healthcare providers (65,66). Furthermore, it might be difficult to apply the knowledge assimilated during the preparation courses without support in the hospital. ...
... Speci c to childbirth in Russia were lower rates of partner and doula support during the childbirth (especially in the provinces of Russia). is is the legacy of the Soviet system of obstetrics (Temkina, 2014). e presence of a partner or other family member during labor was only allowed in state hospitals beginning in 2012; nowadays there is a growing trend for an increased number of deliveries with the partner present (Novkunskaya, 2020). ...
... A new set of policies, introduced in the mid-2000s within the so-called "statist" political framework, aimed to address uneven access to healthcare (Cook 2011;Matveev and Novkunskaya 2020). In 2006, a Foreground National Project "Healthcare" (Natsionalnyy proekt "Zdravookhranenie" [Национальный проект "Здравоохранение"]) was launched targeting improvement of the quality and accessibility of healthcare services, the material provision of medical care, and the working conditions of healthcare practitioners. ...
... However, it appears that psychological factors may be more often central to this issue. These factors include healthcare staff heroism [19], a desire for paternal control [20,21], apathy as a form of abstention [22], fear of uncertainty [23], decision regret [24], a sense of expectation of oneself and others and the resulting fear of failure [25], death anxiety and the reminders of the mortality of self, friends, or family [18], and protecting oneself from the experience of grief [21]. All the above have all been linked with the avoidance of or difficulty with effective EOL communication in qualitative interviews with physicians in acute healthcare settings [26]. ...