Anand E. Sokhey's research while affiliated with University of Colorado Boulder and other places

Publications (69)

Book
The Knowledge Polity advances a holistic view of knowledge production in the social sciences. The familiar publication pipeline metaphor stresses the individual; we move beyond such a conception, offering a vision of academics as members of a knowledge polity where citizenship comes with rights and responsibilities. Knowledge production does not ju...
Article
The 2016 presidential campaign made some feel angry, while others felt anxious, embarrassed, or enthusiastic. We explore how these emotions relate to patterns of political talk within informal conversation networks. Using items from the 2016 Cooperative Congressional Election Study, we link emotional reactions to rates of conversation, interest in...
Article
Objective What factors shape public support for service refusals carried out in the name of the free exercise of religion? Existing analyses treat the businesses refusing to serve LGBT citizens as fungible. We hypothesize that the religious context does not matter and that reactions are consistent with the role of socialized disgust. Methods We en...
Article
Research on the determinants of scholarly productivity is flourishing, driven both by long-standing curiosity about its wide variation, and by recent concern over race and gender inequalities. Beyond standard structural and demographic determinants of research output, some studies point to the role of individual psychology. We contribute to scholar...
Article
Critics of deliberative democracy have worried that deliberation may mirror (or even exacerbate) inequalities in participation across categories such as gender, race, and age. Accordingly, we investigate the potential for technology and design to ameliorate these concerns, looking at the extent to which online deliberative sessions facilitate inclu...
Article
Political scientists commonly use survey experiments–often conducted online–to study the attitudes of the mass public. In these experiments, compensation is usually small and researcher control is limited, which introduces the potential for low respondent effort and attention. This lack of engagement may result in noncompliance with experimental pr...
Book
Website: https://politicsondisplay.com/ Political yard signs are one of the most conspicuous features of American political campaigns, yet they have received little attention as a form of political communication or participation. In a climate in which the American public is highly polarized, these symbols are more than simple campaign tools—they a...
Article
Replications in Context: A Framework for Evaluating New Methods in Quantitative Political Science - Volume 27 Issue 1 - Jeffrey J. Harden, Anand E. Sokhey, Hannah Wilson
Article
In recent work, Teele and Thelen (2017) documented the underrepresentation of female-authored scholarship in a broad selection of political science journals. To better understand these patterns, we present the results of an original, individual-level survey of political scientists conducted in the spring of 2017. Confirming Teele and Thelen’s specu...
Article
network heterogeneity measures are frequently used and often-cited in work on interpersonal political disagreement, but their properties are not well documented and they produce anomalous results relative to other measures of socially supplied disagreement. This study deconstructs the familiar summary network heterogeneity measure to examine why it...
Chapter
Representative Mike Coffman (R) faced a challenging race to maintain his seat in Colorado’s 6th Congressional District. A long-time Republican stronghold, the 6th District had changing demographics that created the distinct possibility for an electoral upset. Noting this possibility, Democratic challenger Morgan Carroll, a Colorado state senator, e...
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Drawing on the sizable literature on polarization in the American public, we consider the link between discussion network composition and perceptions of polarization. Participants in the 2008–2009 ANES panel study were asked to complete an innovative battery; they interactively moved histograms to rate other groups’ positions on several prominent i...
Article
Studies have pointed to politics as an important force driving people away from religion—the argument is that the dogmatic politics of the Christian Right have alienated liberals and moderates, effectively threatening organized religion in America. We argue that existing explanations are incomplete; a proper reconsideration necessitates distinguish...
Article
Prior research on communication in social networks demonstrates its influence on a variety of democratic behaviors including opinion formation, tolerance, voting behavior, and participation. Largely unexplored in this literature is the potential for unexplored heterogeneity in social influence, particularly across gender lines. In this paper, we mo...
Article
Interpersonal disagreement has been linked to a variety of democratic outcomes, and classic theories of social influence place it at the heart of opinion formation. We examine the relationship between exposure to disagreement and information seeking during elections, while developing and testing a theory of heterogeneous effects based on recent wor...
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What happens to partisanship when a party undergoes rapid and visible elite-led changes that dilute its traditional brand? We address scholarly debates on the stability of mass partisanship by analyzing the consequences of the major brand change (marked by policy moderation and scandal) experienced by the leftist Brazilian Workers Party (PT) betwee...
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It is often assumed that core political discussion networks are stable, governed by self-selection. But do individuals name the same political discussants over time? What factors predict retaining previously named people? And does the dropping of discussants make networks more homogeneous? Using original panel studies from across the Americas (Braz...
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Full-text available
What happens to partisanship when a party undergoes rapid and visible elite-led changes that dilute its traditional brand? We address scholarly debates on the stability of mass partisanship by analyzing the consequences of the major brand change (marked by policy moderation and scandal) experienced by the leftist Brazilian Workers Party (PT) betwee...
Article
Do formal deliberative events influence larger patterns of political discussion and public opinion? Critics argue that only a tiny number of people can participate in any given gathering and that deliberation may not remedy—and may in fact exacerbate—inequalities. We assess these criticisms with an experimental design merging a formal deliberative...
Article
Objectives What explains (1) the adoption of these inclusive educational policies, and (2) the timing of the passage of these educational policies? The objective of this study is to examine two competing hypotheses: the first has to do with descriptive representation; the second has to do with Native American nations acting as interest groups.Metho...
Article
We examine congressional cue-taking theory to determine its extent, conditionality, and various forms in the US Senate. Using a novel data-collection technique (timed C-SPAN footage), we focus on temporal dynamics via event history analysis. Examining the effects of senator characteristics across 16 votes from the 108th Congress, we find that commi...
Article
Social context is a vitally important concept to political geographers, but one that suffers from measurement problems and ambiguities of definition, particularly at the most localized levels of measurement. In this paper, we argue that unique insights about context can be gained by combining the tools of survey research with the geographic tools o...
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The passage of (and debate over) immigration laws in Arizona highlights the increasing linguistic diversity of the US. To date, 31 states have passed an English-official bill. In this paper, we test several hypotheses concerning the adoption of such legislation across the states. Using data spanning the past three decades, we present event history...
Article
Despite the ubiquity of yard signs, little is known about how and why individuals display them. Using two original studies of the 2008 presidential race, along with American National Election Study data, we address three points pertaining to this understudied form of political participation. First, what are the correlates of the individuals and hou...
Article
Recent work on social influence has highlighted the importance of socially supplied political expertise, crediting it with strengthening attitudes, resolving ambivalence, and encouraging political participation. However, in focusing on the consequences of socially supplied political expertise, scholars have made the implicit assumption that citizen...
Article
We present results from three large scale survey experiments focused on the manipulation of political name generators. Using syntax that is widely employed outside of political science, we generate interpersonal political network data by varying the roles of alters, the time horizons of relationships, and the specific political nature of social exc...
Article
In the run up to the 2010 midterm elections, pundits and politicos often talked of an “enthusiasm gap” between Republicans and Democrats. Although conventional treatments have typically equated these gaps with changes in turnout and the composition of the electorate, we argue that the term better describes the participatory patterns of highly engag...
Article
The workplace has been hailed as a fruitful context for encountering difference, but other institutions of adult life — notably the church — have been downplayed, as it has been argued that self-selection produces political homogeneity within these environments. At the same time, much of what scholars know about social influence has been based on r...
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Decades of research suggest that social interaction influences opinion formation and affects voting behavior. However, recent work concerning the nexus between deliberation and democratic practice--particularly in the American context--has re-focused attention on the normative consequences of socially-driven political behavior. Among the most commo...
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At the center of debates on deliberative democracy is the issue of how much real deliberation citizens experience on a regular basis in their core social networks. These “disagreements about disagreement” come in a variety of forms, with scholars advocating significantly different empirical approaches (e.g., Huckfeldt, Johnson, and Sprague 2004; Mu...
Article
Does historical political legacy influence current rates of political discussion, and if so, for how long does a historical legacy have an impact? That is, does a country’s former regime type continue to influence this type of interpersonal interaction even after its demise? We examine the role of historical political legacy by modeling rates of po...
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Arizona's recent passage of Senate Bill 1070 has reignited a national debate over illegal immigration (and immigration more generally), bringing language politics back to the fore. Over the last one-hundred years, states have intermittently introduced and passed legislation declaring English as the exclusive language of government services. However...
Article
A growing literature attempts to link Wal-Mart's presence in a community to rates of political participation and membership in civic associations. The debate is currently fought out by competing econometric models – some find a negative association between Wal-Mart and social capital, while others find that there is no relationship. To better exami...
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Some of the most fundamental concerns about democratic politics involve information - who has access to it, how do individuals get it, and of what quality and type is it? The answers to each of these questions invariably involve other people, and it is for this reason that modern democracy is unthinkable save in terms of social networks.
Article
What are the ripple effects from structured deliberation sessions? To better understand the potential aggregate consequences of these (somewhat limited) opportunities, we focus on the social networks of participants, looking for the informational consequences of second-hand exposure. We report on the results of a field experiment in which randomly...
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Interest in deliberative theories of democracy has grown tremendously among political theorists, political scientists, activists, and even government officials. Many scholars, however, are skeptical that it is a practically viable theory, even on its own terms. They argue (inter alia) that most people dislike politics and that deliberative initiati...
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Displaying a political yard sign is a conspicuous element of the election experience but an understudied act of political participation. We argue that the study of spatial patterns in the dissemination of yard signs speaks to the debate over “context” as a cause of political participation. We ask whether evidence of such contextual effects exist, a...
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Scholars have long been interested in understanding how members of Congress make voting decisions, for this process is at the core of representative democracy. Existing literature investigating the nature of Congressional cue-taking identifies several sources that members of Congress may look to as a means of developing their own vote choices. Our...
Article
The 2008 Democratic primary was marked by divisiveness as notable as its historic candidates. And while Barack Obama won the general election,political scientists would be remiss in studying divisive primary effects only when they are electorally decisive. Accordingly, we examine this largely forgotten storyline, searching for these effects through...
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Using an original, six-wave panel survey conducted in two cities, we find that 1) mass partisanship in Brazil shares important similarities with mass partisan identification in developed countries, and 2) that for many citizens, such identification is a social identity. Our findings are surprising given the relative newness of Brazil’s party system...
Chapter
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Researchers are often interested in more than just the occurrence or non-occurrence of a political events; often the timing of events is of equal substantive importance, whether it is the dissolution of a government's cabinet (e.g., King et al. 1990; Warwick 1992; Diermeier and Stevenson 1999), the presence of international military disputes (Jones...
Article
After the Baby Boomers: How Twenty- and Thirty-Somethings are Shaping the Future of American Religion. By WuthnowRobert. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2007. xxiii + 298 pp. $29.95 cloth - Volume 2 Issue 3 - Anand Edward Sokhey
Article
Interest in deliberative theories of democracy has grown tremendously among political theorists over the last twenty years. Many scholars in political behavior, however, are skeptical that it is a practically viable theory, even on its own terms. They argue (inter alia) that most people dislike politics, and that deliberative initiatives would amou...
Article
A generation of political network research has paid little attention to gender, rarely treating it as the subject of inquiry. At the same time, mechanisms of social influence often go unexamined in the literature. Troubled by these oversights, we employ original data and innovative survey items to consider how network construction, and importantly,...
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As the most popular voluntary association in the United States, churches are sometimes touted as saviors of democracy. However, those who espouse deliberative models of democracy rarely see churches as nurturing the decision-making abilities of attenders. Thus, the authors examine the extent to which church small group sessions fulfill the conditio...
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Seizing upon the opportunity afforded by a Republican primary contest in which a candidate backed by the Christian Right took on a candidate with connections to the party establishment, we examine the strength of the Christian right at the grassroots in Ohio. Using individual-level data compiled from an original survey instrument administered to ov...
Article
We investigate the sources of an important form of social inequality: the social processes by which men and women acquire participatory resources in organizations. In particular, we investigate the extent to which men and women acquire civic skills and are targets for political recruitment within churches. Integrating theory about social interactio...
Chapter
In 2004, voters in eleven states voted on various forms of a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage, and the proposals passed by comfortable margins in all eleven states.* Ohio was among these eleven states. Its voters passed constitutional amendment Issue 1, a measure pushed by the Cincinnati-based group Citizens for Community Values,...
Article
Objectives. Support for Israel has been a hallmark issue of the Jewish lobby in American politics. But what do Jewish religious leaders think about U.S. policy toward Israel and the peace process, and how often do they address these issues? Methods. Using a sample of more than 400 rabbis drawn from the four major movements of American Judaism in th...
Chapter
The 2000 election was groundbreaking for the Jewish community. Senator Joseph Lieberman (D-CT), an observant Orthodox Jew, was nominated to be the Democratic vice-presidential candidate. In addition, the presidential election events, especially in Florida, highlighted the important and sometimes central role of the Jewish community in American poli...
Article
The 2000 elections were watershed elections for the Jewish community. Joseph Lieberman, an observant Orthodox Jew, was nominated to be the Democratic vice presidential candidate and the events in Florida and New York highlighted the important role of the Jewish community in American politics. The 2000 elections were, therefore, a perfect time to as...
Article
One of the persistent problems facing the Jewish community is anti-Semitism, which has a long, tragic history in the United States and abroad. At the same time, anti-Semitic acts are probably at their lowest ebb in American history. Using a sample of more than 400 rabbis drawn from the four great movements of American Judaism, we investigate rabbi...
Article
Displaying a political yard sign is a conspicuous but understudied act that toes the line between political participation and political communication. While these signs constitute an important part of campaigns � and anecdotal evidence suggests that political sign wars arise in neighborhoods � no systematic, spatio-temporal analysis of such behavio...
Article
In this manuscript we focus on event history analysis, noting several prominent applications to the study of politics. We begin by discussing different modeling strategies, along with problems and misconceptions common (and unique) to political survival research. We then introduce the Cox proportional hazards model, describing its logic, estimation...

Citations

... Second, systematic studies of research productivity of political scientists in diverse institutions (Djupe et al. 2020;Hesli and Lee 2011) demonstrated support for only a small number of predictor variables in our data: faculty rank, gender, teaching load, and frequency of conference attendance. The latter variable, however, was never a significant predictor in our more homogenous subset of faculty in PhD programs; therefore, we omitted it from our analyses. ...
... Meski demikian, paling tidak terdapat beberapa kecenderungan dari studi terdahulu yang dapat dipetakan. Pertama, partisipasi daring ikut memengaruhi pola komunikasi dan Keterlibatan sosial (Ognyanova, Chen, & Ball-rokeach, 2013;Kennedy et al., 2021). Kedua, partisipasi secara daring dilakukan dengan memanfaatkan jejaring media sosial (Jennings, Suzuki, & Hubbard, 2020;Jubba et al., 2020;Aji, 2019). ...
... The mechanism they suggest is likely to be political content from religious elites. This resonates with a community study in Colorado Springs, where exclusive values paired with political communication in church were more likely to be linked to political intolerance (Schaffer et al., 2015). ...
... One challenge with using online samples is the inattentiveness of respondents (Harden et al., 2019). To alleviate this concern, we follow Gueorguiev et al. (2020) and drop all subjects that completed the survey in less than five minutes. ...
... The measure of place resentment presented here, in tandem with other path breaking work in this area (Cramer 2016;Jacobs and Munis 2019;Wuthnow 2018), provides a jumping off point for others to begin to flesh out this understanding. In addition to investigating closely the links between place, race, and partisanship, scholars should direct their attention toward understanding how place influences how citizens view and engage with government (Makse et al. 2019), as well as how place influences the adoption of policy opinions. Finally, scholars should continue to refine and even generate new measures of place resentment. ...
... (For a general discussion, see Gherghina and Katsanidou 2013;Gleditsch, Metelits, and Strand 2003;Ishiyama 2014;and Nosek et al. 2015. Specific examples are in Lall 2016 and in the extended debate in Harden, Sokhey, and Wilson 2018;Heuberger 2018;Muchlinski et al. 2018;Neunhoeffer and Sternberg 2018;and Wang 2018.) Archival code and data also are used pedagogically, particularly in graduate methodology courses (Janz 2016). ...
... A rich recent literature on patterns in publication and citation in political science by author gender finds that women tend to receive fewer citations than men (Atchison 2017;Maliniak, Powers, and Walter 2013;Masuoka, Grofman, and Feld 2007;Mitchell, Lange, and Brus 2013). Explanations suggested for lower citation counts among women scholars include low descriptive representation (Chibnik 2014;Mitchell, Lange, and Brus 2013); gendered topic or methodological preferences (Djupe, Smith, and Sokhey 2019;Ferber and Brün 2011;Maliniak, Powers, and Walter 2013;Teele and Thelen 2017); gendered tendencies of self-promotion, including self-citation (Atchison 2017;Maliniak, Powers, and Walter 2013); and gendered citation patterns via homophilous networks (Atchison 2018). The dataset we introduce facilitates analysis of publication and citation patterns within gender and politics scholarship rather than differences between men and women scholars of political science. ...
... In line with widely used and well-validated measures of discussion heterogeneity (Hutchens et al., 2018;Scheufele et al., 2004), we construct, in Study 1 and Study 2, an index summarizing respondents' answers to a series of items asking about their discussions with people who have various political characteristics: "Over the past week, did you talk about politics or public affairs [face-to-face/online] with the following people? 3 1) People whose political views are different from yours; 2) People who support the Liberal Party; 3) People who support the Conservative Party; 4) People with extreme left views; 5) People with extreme right views." ...
... As such, the IP can help explain not only why female faculty submit less, but also why they avoid submitting to top journals. As a matter of fact, the "risk aversion" and perfectionism of female scholars revealed in the interviews conducted by Closa et al. (2020), as well as the diffidence revealed by the way women interact with journal editors shown by Bettecken et al. in this symposium, are largely congruent with the IP (Djupe et al. 2019). In summary, the literature suggests that the impostor phenomenon is a cause of reduced female scholarly productivity which should not be ignored (Wester et al. 2020): therefore, it is not surprising that the major universities offer resources to cope with it. ...
... Secondly, to our knowledge, this article is the first to show empirically that perceptions of a religious leader's authority can decrease when they openly adopt political stances. Previous studies have demonstrated that individuals may abandon their faith or religious affiliation because they respond negatively to a perceived connection between religion and politics (see, for example, Djupe, Neiheisel, and Sokhey 2018;Hout and Fischer 2002;Patrikios 2008), and others have argued that religious actors may weaken their moral authority and political influence by engaging openly in politics (Gill 2017;Grzymala-Busse 2015;Grzymala-Busse 2016). To date, however, there is little quantitative evidence that the religious influence of specific religious leaders can be affected by the extent of their ties to politics. 1 Paradoxically, our evidence on this question supports the idea that religious leaders who maintain their distance from politics may actually be more capable of shaping political outcomes because their neutrality protects their religious authority and gives them greater capacity to shape the values and worldviews of their followers. ...