Ana Basaguren's research while affiliated with Universidad del País Vasco / Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea and other places

Publications (78)

Article
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Detritivores are pivotal in forest streams as they process detritus and promote secondary production. Many studies have addressed the preference of freshwater detritivores towards materials of differing quality. Nevertheless, few studies compare the resource preferences in the laboratory with the availability in the field. In the present study, fee...
Article
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Ongoing global warming is expected to alter temperature-dependent processes. Nevertheless, how co-occurring local drivers will influence temperature sensitivity of plant litter decomposition in lotic ecosystems remains uncertain. Here, we examined the temperature sensitivity of microbial-mediated decomposition, microbial respiration, fungal biomass...
Article
Biodiversity loss is known to affect the two fundamental and opposite processes controlling carbon and nutrient cycles globally, that is, primary production and decomposition, which are driven by green and brown food web compartments, respectively. However, biodiversity in these two food web compartments has been mostly studied independently, and p...
Article
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Leaf litter of alder (Alnus glutinosa) is a key resource to detrital stream food webs. Due to its high quality and palatability, it is readily colonised by microorganisms and consumed by detritivores, contributing significantly to carbon and nutrient cycling and to ecosystem functioning. Given that this species has declined due to the spread of the...
Chapter
A key or keystone species is defined as a species with disproportionately large effects on the ecosystem relative to its abundance. In freshwater ecology it is often used with a bottom-up perspective, to refer to riparian plant species whose litter resources are of particular importance for invertebrate communities and ecosystem processes. This inc...
Article
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The relationship between detritivore diversity and decomposition can provide information on how biogeochemical cycles are affected by ongoing rates of extinction, but such evidence has come mostly from local studies and microcosm experiments. We conducted a globally distributed experiment (38 streams across 23 countries in 6 continents) using stand...
Article
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Extreme temperature events have increased in intensity, duration and frequency in the last century, with potential consequences on organisms and ecosystems. In many streams, leaf litter of terrestrial origin is a key resource for microorganisms and some detritivores, and its decomposition has a main role on ecosystem functioning and is often used a...
Article
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Plant biodiversity loss in riparian forests is known to alter key stream ecosystem processes such as leaf litter decomposition. One potential mechanism mediating this biodiversity–decomposition relationship is the increased variability of plant functional traits at higher levels of biodiversity, providing more varied resources for decomposers and t...
Article
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Abstract Plant litter decomposition is a key ecosystem process that can be altered by global changes such as biodiversity loss. These effects can be particularly important in detritus-based ecosystems, such as headwater streams, which are mainly fuelled by allochthonous plant litter inputs. However, experiments examining effects of plant diversity...
Article
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Biodiversity loss is occurring globally at unprecedented rates, altering the functioning of the Earth's ecosystems. Multiple processes are often key components of ecosystem functioning, but it is unclear how biodiversity loss affects ecosystem multifunctionality (i.e., the ability of ecosystems to maintain multiple processes simultaneously). This i...
Article
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1. Understanding how biodiversity loss influences plant litter decomposition – i.e., the biologically mediated conversion of coarse to fine particulate organic matter – is crucial to predict changes in the functioning of many stream ecosystems, where detrital food webs are dominant. Rates of litter decomposition are influenced by detritivore divers...
Article
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Biodiversity loss in riparian forests has the potential to alter rates of leaf litter decomposition in stream ecosystems. However, studies have reported the full range of positive, negative and no effects of plant diversity loss on decomposition, and there is currently no explanation for such inconsistent results. Furthermore, it is uncertain wheth...
Data
Mean (± SE) net diversity, complementarity and selection effects on litter decomposition, and net diversity effect on FPOM production, for the 4-species litter mixture (ACQI) and the different 3-species mixtures (ACQ, ACI, AQI and CQI) in microcosms with detritivores. A: Alnus glutinosa; C: Corylus avellana; Q: Quercus robur; I: Ilex aquifolium (DO...
Data
Effects of plant diversity loss on litter decomposition (mg) and FPOM production (mg) for the 4-species litter mixture (ACQI) and the different 3-species mixtures (ACQ, ACI, AQI and CQI) in microcosms without detritivores, examined with linear models. A: Alnus glutinosa; C: Corylus avellana; Q: Quercus robur; I: Ilex aquifolium. (DOCX)
Data
Excel spreadsheet containing the underlying numerical data for all figures and tables. (XLSX)
Article
Climate change and anthropogenic disturbances are expected to lead to more intense and frequent droughts, with potentially severe effects on structure and function of perennial temperate streams. However, more information is required on whether streams flowing through basins already affected by exotic plantations will respond to droughts in the sam...
Article
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River ecosystems are subject to multiple stressors that affect their structure and functioning. Ecosystem structure refers to characteristics such as channel form, water quality or the composition of biological communities, whereas ecosystem functioning refers to processes such as metabolism, organic matter decomposition or secondary production. St...
Article
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We are facing major biodiversity loss and there is evidence that such loss can alter ecosystem functioning. However, the effects of plant diversity on decomposition – a key component of the global carbon cycle – are still unclear. A recent study suggested that a plant trait – their nitrogen (N)-fixing capacity – could mediate effects of litter dive...
Article
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The replacement of native forests by exotic tree monocultures, such as those of Eucalyptus, decreases the quality of leaf litter inputs to streams and often reduces riparian cover, which can elevate water temperature. The combined effects of these stressors on the survival and performance of detritivores may be important, as detritivore species los...
Article
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Drought, an important environmental factor affecting the functioning of stream ecosystems, is likely to become more prevalent in the Mediterranean region as a consequence of climate change and enhanced water demand. Drought can have profound impacts on leaf litter decomposition, a key ecosystem process in headwater streams, but there is still limit...
Research
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Leaf-litter decomposition is a widespread functional indicator to assess the stream ecosystem status. However, the spatial location of leaf-bags could distort the impact assessment since intrinsic features of a given site have an important role in the spatial distribution of macroinvertebrates, which could affect decomposition rate. A source of var...
Article
Full-text available
Leaf-litter decomposition is a widespread functional indicator to assess the stream ecosystem status. However, the spatial location of leaf-bags could distort the impact assessment since intrinsic features of a given site have an important role in the spatial distribution of macroinvertebrates, which could affect decomposition rate. A source of var...
Article
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In temperate streams, water temperature and organic matter inputs from surrounding forest vary along the altitude. We tested if the different features of streams of similar size determined by an altitudinal gradient might differentially affect the processing rate of different quality leaves (alder, oak and beech). To distinguish the relative contri...
Article
Eucalypt plantations cover over 1.5 million ha in the Iberian Peninsula. The effects of the replacement of native deciduous forests by exotic plantations on stream communities and litter decomposition, a key ecosystem process in forest streams, are poorly understood. We compared microbially driven and total (microbes + invertebrates) decomposition...
Article
Eucalypt leaves are an organic matter source of poor quality, and therefore, extensive eucalypt plantations can affect stream ecology. Nevertheless, it is difficult to discern the effects of altered inputs from other impacts of plantations, such as increased erosion from periodic clearcuttings. To assess the effects of eucalypt inputs on organic ma...
Article
Although the effect of resource quality on density, biomass, growth rate and secondary production of consumers has been frequently documented, the direct repercussion of resource quality on reproduction has been less investigated. Here we tested the hypothesis that resource quality can limit body-condition recovery of reproducing individuals. For t...
Article
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The replacement of native vegetation by exotic species has the potential to impact detritus based stream ecosystems. To test the possible consequences of vegetation alteration on stream ecosystem functioning we com-pared the processing rate and invertebrate colonisation of leaves from fi ve different tree species, two natives (Alnus glutinosa and Q...
Article
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Agricultural and urban runoffs result in increased nitrogen and phosphorus inputs in rivers and are the cause of eutrophication. Headwater streams are less frequently affected by these impairments because of the low-to-moderate human activities there. Eutrophication can affect the structure and function of benthic communities in headwater streams,...
Article
Terrestrial plant litter is important in sustaining stream food webs in forested headwaters. Leaf litter quality often decreases when native species are replaced by introduced species, and a lower quality of leaf litter inputs may alter litter decomposition at sites afforested with non-native species. However, since detritivore composition and reso...
Article
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We studied benthic macroinvertebrate communities upstream and downstream of five small reservoirs (surface release in autumn–winters) (north Spain) to assess the effect of flow regulation on structural and functional characteristics of stream ecosystems. We based our approach on the use of structural metrics (density, biomass, richness and diversit...
Article
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The main purpose of our work was to elucidate factors responsible for the geographical differences in leaf-litter decomposition rates in Spanish oligotrophic headwater streams. Decomposition experiments with alder (Alnus glutinosa) leaf litter were carried out in 22 headwater streams in 4 different climatic regions across the Iberian Peninsula (Cor...
Article
The main purpose of our work was to elucidate factors responsible for the geographical differences in leaf-litter decomposition rates in Spanish oligotrophic headwater streams. Decomposition experiments with alder (Alnus glutinosa) leaf litter were carried out in 22 headwater streams in 4 different climatic regions across the Iberian Peninsula (Cor...
Article
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The life history and secondary production of E. torrentium were investigated at three sites along a small Spanish stream. This species had an univoltine winter life history with recruitment from June to November. It showed asynchronous development, which is consistent with the unpredictable environment where they dwell. E. torrentium showed higher...
Article
1. Low pH inhibits microbial conditioning of leaf-litter, which forms the principal energy input to many headwater streams. This reduces food quality and availability for the shredder assemblage, thereby creating a potential bottleneck in the flux of energy and biomass through acidified food webs. 2. We explored the consequences of acidity on the w...
Article
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Eucalyptus globulus plantations are spreading in the northern areas of the Iberian Peninsula, substituting natural deciduous riparian vegetation. Whereas laboratory studies with leaf litter of this species have found detrimental effects on detritivorous species, field studies did not support a strong negative effect. Hence, we compared taxon richne...
Article
The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of Eucalyptus plantations on population and biochemistry parameters of 3 stream invertebrates. The shredder Echinogammarus spp. had significantly lower densities, proportion of adults and lower accumulation rates of mass, lipid, carbon and nitrogen in eucalypt sites than in native deciduous sites. Fo...
Article
Climate affects many aspects of stream ecosystems, although the presence of riparian forests can buffer differences between streams in different climatic settings. In an attempt to measure the importance of climate, we compared the seasonal patterns of hydrology, input and storage of allochthonous organic matter, and the trophic structure (abundanc...
Article
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The effect of sieve mesh size on the description of macroinvertebrate communities Considerable time and effort is required to estimate the abundance and biomass of benthic macroinvertebrates, and often vari-able mesh size sieves are used to clean collected samples. We test whether the use of a mesh with a 1 mm pore size is adequate to obtain a vali...
Article
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To test whether leaf litter from eucalyptus plantations affects stream macroinvertebrate communities, we manipulated litter inputs into a small headwater tributary of the Agüera stream (northern Spain) running under mixed deciduous forests. Three contiguous 50 m long reaches were used: the upstream reach was left as a control (site C), whereas the...
Article
We studied the influence of inorganic substrata size, leaf litter and woody debris removal on the resistance of benthic invertebrates to floods in two contrasting forested headwater streams of the Agüera basin (northern Spain): Cuchillo stream (stream bed dominated by cobbles and pebbles) and Salderrey stream (stream bed dominated by bedrock and bo...
Article
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The macroinvertebrate community was studied in 3 reaches along a north-Iberian stream that differ in the amount and nature of food resources. Regardless of shading and water quality, both invertebrate density and biomass were higher at the 2 downstream sites than at the headwater site. The taxonomic composition and functional organization of the fa...
Article
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The life history and temporal dynamics in density, biomass, growth rate and secondary production of Habrophlebia lauta and Habroleptoides confusa were compared in 3 sites along the Agüera stream in northern Spain. Both species had univoltine winter life histories. Hb. lauta showed greater abundance and production at downstream sites, while Hd. conf...
Article
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We show the regression equations that relate the head width of 10 freshwater insect species or the length of the first thoracic segment of 2 amphipods with their dry mass in 3 reaches along a small stream in northern Spain. Spatial differences in size–mass relationships were found. Organisms stored in alcohol showed lower dry mass than those specim...
Article
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Life history patterns of Lepidostoma hirtum, Sericostoma selysii, Hydropsyche pellucidula and Hydropsyche siltalai were investigated for a year in the Aguera stream (northern Spain). All four species showed univoltine life cycles, low synchronisation of larval development, and extended periods of hatching and flight. Young larvae of all four specie...
Article
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The effect ofa drought on the inacroinvertebrate coinni~inity was studied in a 1st order tributary ofthe Agüera stream (iiorth- ern Spain), from Noveiiiber 1995 to May 1996. During the dry period taxa richness was very low. Chironomidae, Ceratopogonidae, Odonata, Oligochaeta and Mollusca were recorded in the streambed. Non-flying taxa were dominant...
Article
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We review the main results of fourteen years of research in the Agüera stream (nor-thern Spain) from an ecosystem perspective. Physico-chemical characteristics show large spatial variations in the Agüera hydrographic net because of differences in geology and soil uses across the basin. Temporal variations are important at different scales, from die...
Article
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Population dynamics and production of C. luctuosa were compared in two reaches of the Agera stream (northern Spain). This species showed univoltine winter life history in both sites. However, the start of the recruitment period, and the cohort production interval differed in 1 month between reaches. Secondary production of C. luctuosa ranged from 7...
Article
Life history and secondary production of E. ignita were determined in two reaches of the Aguera stream (northern Spain). Production was much higher (> x 2) at the reach where the nymphs hatched earliest. However, there was no evidence to support a link between E. ignita production and timing of the recruitment, as in both reaches it achieved simila...
Article
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To test the hypothesis that decomposition of leaf species in streams is influenced by afforestation with Eucalyptus globules, we compared decay rates, nutrient levels, fungal biomass and macroinvertebrate assemblages on alder and eucalyptus leaf litter in three streams (two headwaters under different forests, and a mid reach) of the Agüera catchmen...
Article
Water chemistry and macroinvertebrates were studied in the River Tera (north-western Spain) to assess the effects on the river of two chained reservoirs with hypolimnetic release during the stratification period in 1991.The river-water variables most affected by the dam in this study are temperature, pH, conductivity, silicate, ammonia, nitrate and...
Article
Macroinvertebrate communities were studied in relation to food (particulate organic matter and periphyton) availability and hydrologic regime in two reaches (autotrophic and heterotrophic) of the Agüera stream (Northern Spain). The structure of macroinvertebrate community reflected the trophic characteristics (main food sources) at each site. From...
Article
Water quality levels and loads of nutrients transported by the Agüera stream (northern Spain) were studied for a year to assess the self-purification capacity of this system. The main villages produce an increase of nutrient concentrations and a degradation of water quality. Nevertheless, the high retention capacity, especially for phosphate, allow...
Article
The variability of fine particulate organic matter concentrations in the streams of a moderately disturbed catchment were studied under different spatial and temporal scales. Spatial patterns of FPOM concentrations clearly reflect the effects of disturbances imposed by human settlements and land uses, and recovery processes. Temporal changes are ma...
Article
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An ordination of the River Cadagua basin has been made using trichopteran taxa as entities. Differences between headwater reaches and lower parts of the main river and its principal tributaries are chiefly based on the downstream substitution of the species of the genus Rhyacophila by species of the genus Hydropsyche. On the plane of the first two...
Article
Ninety two taxa of benthic macroinvertebrate were used to ordinate 175 sites from main water courses of Biscay (Basque Country) by means of correspondence analysis (CA). On the plane of the first two axes from CA, changes in macroinvertebrate community structure were observed between rivers due to differences in natural eutrophication and also as a...
Article
This paper deals with the abundance and distribution of caddisfly larvae in the River Butron basin. Spatio-temporal changes in caddisfly community structure, detected by means of correspondence analysis, are related to physico-chemical changes, mainly conductivity and oxygen.
Article
Seventeen physico-chemical variables related to water mineralization and nutrient status were analyzed at 175 sites of the principal catchment areas of Biscay (Basque Country, North Spain). Each site was visited on four occasions: winter, spring, summer and autumn and all data were ordered by means of principal component analysis. The chemical feat...
Article
Seventeen physico-chemical variables related to water mineralization and nutrient status were analyzed at 175 sites of the principal catchment areas of Biscay (Basque Country, North Spain). Each site was visited on four occasions: winter, spring, summer and autumn and all data were ordered by means of principal component analysis. The chemical feat...
Article
In the Lea River basin, 47 taxa of caddisflies have been found belonging to 32 genera and 15 families. Rhyacophilidae (5 species), Hydropsychidae (6 species), Limnophilidae (4 species) and Polycentropodidae (4 species) were the dominant families; Hydropsyche pellucidula being the most abundant species. Using all these taxa as entities, an ordinatio...

Citations

... Over the last three decades, it has been demonstrated that litter decay is influenced by a variety of chemical properties of the litter, including the litter N (Hobbie et al., 2012;Karki et al., 2022;Li et al., 2022), P and K concentrations and lignin content (Liu et al., 2022). However, Monroy et al. (2022) suggested that in temperate regions, chemical properties may not be a good predictor of litter decomposability. Climatic factors like temperature, humidity and rainfall regulate the decomposition processes (Sanderman and Amundson, 2005;Kumar et al., 2021) and among these drivers rainfall pattern assert decomposition more than any other environmental drivers (Bradford et al., 2016;Steidinger et al., 2019). ...
... leaves, a common riparian species in the study area. Alder is considered a key riparian plant species and a model litter widely used in decomposition experiments across Europe and elsewhere [19]. Five days before seawater intrusion (15 November 2013), groups of 5 air-dried leaves (1.15 g ± 0.09 standard deviation [SD]) were sprinkled with distilled water to avoid damage, tied by the petiole to form leaf packs, and nine leaf packs were introduced and let sunk naturally in each mesocosm. ...
... However, when we consider their biomass, they can play an important role in the process of leaf decomposition (Tonin et al. 2014;Aguiar et al. 2017;Martins et al. 2017b). Therefore, it is essential to know their relationship with the functioning of tropical aquatic ecosystems, especially given the increased risk to these ecosystems under projected global climate change and as a result of growing deforestation for agriculture and livestock (Strassburg et al. 2017;Boyero et al. 2021). ...
... On a small scale, these processes are influenced by the characteristics of plant species in the riparian zone (Alonso et al. 2021), which favor the action of microorganisms and shredders (Biasi et al. 2017). On a larger scale, the geology and climate also influence the decomposition of litter in streams (Graça et al. 2015). ...
... The effect size was performed by analogous to the response ratio commonly used in meta-analysis and recently used to evaluate ecological processes such as detritus breakdown (Correa-Araneda et al., 2020;López-Rojo et al., 2020a, 2020b. In this analysis, we tested from the mass loss from cotton strip and balsa wood from "adjacent forests to no-till soybean systems" and "no-till soybean systems" treatments by ratios between each treatment and the control (native forest in conservation unit; Figs. 1 and 2) at the respective litter (cotton and balsa), mesh (coarse and fine), and local (buried and surface). ...