Amy E. Treat's research while affiliated with Oklahoma State University - Tulsa and other places

Publications (9)

Article
Full-text available
Theory and research indicate that adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are linked to negative parenting attitudes and behaviors. We posit that protective and compensatory experiences (PACEs) in childhood buffer the negative effects of ACEs on later parenting. To test this premise, the present study examined associations between ACEs, PACEs, and att...
Article
This study investigated the associations between maternal depression when infants were 3 to 11 months old ( M = 6 months), and positive parenting behaviors when children were between 12 and 22 months ( M = 17 months) and the home language environment assessed when children were 18 to 28 months old ( M = 23.5 months) in a sample of 29 low-income mot...
Article
A child’s early language skills are one of the best predictors of academic success, and a number of community interventions have aimed to increase caregiver–child interactions to improve language development and related outcomes. This article describes ongoing community efforts in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, aimed at enriching...
Article
The relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and negative physical and mental health outcomes is well established (Felitti et al. [1998]. Relationship of childhood abuse and household dysfunction to many of the leading causes of death in adults: The adverse childhood experiences (ACE) study. American Journal of Preventive Medicine,...
Article
This study explored whether parents’ ability to regulate their behaviour and attention, assessed as components of everyday executive function (EF), was influenced by their past adverse experiences – such as abuse, neglect, and family dysfunction – and in turn, influenced current relationships with their children. The sample included 73 parent–child...
Chapter
In this chapter we provide an overview of the theoretical perspectives informing research and practice in early relationships, including attachment theory, psychodynamic theory, sociocultural theory, infant mental health, synchrony, the biopsychosocial model, and risk and resilience. This overview is followed by future directions for research and p...
Article
Parent adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and caregiver reports of harsh parenting were examined in relation to the executive function (EF) abilities in young low-income children. Data were collected from 55 mother–child dyads; 17–40 months of age. Parent measures included the ACEs questionnaire and harsh parenting items from the Adult Adolescent...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, the authors posit that programs promoting nurturing parent–child relationships influence outcomes of parents and young children living in poverty through two primary mechanisms: (a) strengthening parents' social support and (b) increasing positive parent–child interactions. The authors discuss evidence for these mechanisms as catal...

Citations

... Propensity scores demonstrated strong predictive, construct, and discriminant validity, while the severity and diversity scores each only passed 2 of the 3 validity tests. Thus far, to our knowledge, this measure has been used and cited in one 2021 peer-reviewed publication (Morris et al., 2021). ...
... The dashed line is the ordinary least squares linear fit and the dotted lines are 95% prediction intervals. BDI,Lam-CassettariI & Kohlhoff, 2020;Treat et al., 2020). Whereas greater maternal engagement during storytelling was associated with increased engagement of neural circuits supporting learning (cerebellum) which was functionally connected with regions related to language (left BA 39) and cognitive processing(left BA 6, 8, 9, right BA 8;Hutton et al., 2017) maternal disengagement was related to decreased engagement of neural circuits supporting verbal processing. ...
... Given the detrimental impact of ACEs on parent and child mental health, addressing the effects of toxic stress and early childhood trauma is a public health imperative (Waters et al., 2018). Parenting interventions can effectively improve parent mental health and parenting, two important mediators of parental ACEs and child outcomes (Treat et al., 2020;Wolford et al., 2019). Structured group parenting interventions (GPIs) are increasingly applied for parents with histories of trauma. ...
... A reliable community consisting of supportive and nurturing family, school, or peer relationships acts as a buffer for the effects of ACEs (Yule et al., 2019). This is achieved by promoting healthy bio-psycho-social development and bio-behavioral synchrony (Morris et al., 2018). The absence of these positive relationships does not prompt wellness. ...
... Parental histories of trauma and maltreatment have been linked to children's emotional and behavioral problems broadly (Plant et al., 2017;Stargel & Easterbrooks, 2020;Wurster et al., 2020), and specifically to children's ER through the impact on parental mental health and parenting behaviors (Spieker et al., 2018). Furthermore, caregivers with a history of trauma and maltreatment are at higher risk of emotion dysregulation themselves (Cloitre et al., 2019), which may impact important caregiving dimensions and modeling of adaptive emotional responses important for their children's development of ER (Guss et al., 2020;Khoury et al., 2021;Lange et al., 2019;Spieker et al., 2018;Steele et al., 2016). For example, Osborne et al. (2021) found that parental childhood maltreatment history was associated with their current ER and indirectly associated with a physiological measure of ER in their children. ...
... It is particularly important to study the EF of children from low and middle-income countries like Pakistan, where not only have children and their parents experience adversity such as a lack of recourses, educational opportunities but also children have different proximal early life experiences, e.g. cognitive stimulation (Black et al., 2017;Treat, Sheffield Morris, Williamson, Hays-Grudo, & Laurin, 2019). Studies have provided evidence that parents with higher educational levels provide a better cognitively stimulating environment for their offspring (Hoff, 2003). ...
... Studies involving vulnerable youth have shown that children are more likely to be resilient if their social ecologies are supportive and nurturing [21][22][23]. My preliminary findings support existing literature that resilience of a child depends on resilience of interconnected systems, particularly families and schools [10,14,24]. These findings were consistent across ethnicity and gender. ...