Amanda Rundblad's research while affiliated with University of Oslo and other places

Publications (23)

Article
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Dairy is important in many people’s diets. Although all dairy products are made from cow’s milk, various dairy products are made by different processes. This means that they can end up having different nutrients and properties. Researchers and nutritionists usually group all dairy as one food group, but this might miss information about the health...
Article
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The current epidemics of cardiovascular and metabolic noncommunicable diseases have emerged alongside dramatic modifications in lifestyle and living environments. These correspond to changes in our “modern” postwar societies globally characterized by rural-to-urban migration, modernization of agricultural practices, and transportation, climate chan...
Article
Scope The aim of this study was to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of replacing dietary saturated fat (SFA) with polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk using a whole transcriptome approach. Methods and results Healthy subjects with moderate hypercholesterolemia (n = 115) were randomly assigned to a c...
Article
Mol. Nutr. Food Res. 2020, 64, 2000319 DOI: 10.1002/mnfr.202000319 In a randomized controlled cross‐over trial that analyzed postprandial gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, intake of the fermented dairy products cheese and sour cream induced a less pro‐inflammatory response than the non‐fermented dairy products butter and whippe...
Article
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Scope We aimed to investigate how intake of high‐fat meals composed of different dairy products with a similar fat content affects postprandial peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) expression of inflammation related genes, as well as circulating inflammatory markers and metabolites. Methods and results Healthy subjects (n = 47) consumed four d...
Article
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Fish consumption is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which may be partly mediated by alterations in plasma lipids, such as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). However, comprehensive analyses of associations between fatty fish consumption and lipoprotein subclass profile are limited and show inconsistent result...
Article
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A healthy dietary pattern is associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and reduced inflammation. To explore this at the molecular level, we investigated the effect of a Nordic diet (ND) on changes in the gene expression profiles of inflammatory and lipid-related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of individuals with...
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Background: Adequate protein intake among older adults is associated with better health outcomes such as immune function and metabolic regulation of skeletal muscle, but conflicting results make it difficult to define the optimal intake. To further understand the impact of protein intake on metabolic processes, the aim of the study was to explore...
Article
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Background: Innate and adaptive immune responses are pivotal in atherosclerosis, but their association with early-stage atherosclerosis in humans is incompletely understood. In this regard, untreated children with familial hypercholesterolemia may serve as a human model to investigate the effect of elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholestero...
Article
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Background Intake of the marine omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) reduces fasting triglyceride (TG) levels and may thereby lower cardiovascular disease risk. However, there are large inter-individual differences in the TG-lowering effect of omega-3 supplementation. Genotype differences partly explain thi...
Article
Scope To explore the effect of a healthy Nordic diet on the global transcriptome profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of subjects with the metabolic syndrome. Methods and Results Subjects with the metabolic syndrome underwent an 18/24 week randomized intervention study comparing an isocaloric healthy Nordic diet with an average ha...
Article
Full-text available
Marine n -3 (omega-3) fatty acids alter gene expression by regulating the activity of transcription factors. Krill oil is a source of marine n -3 fatty acids that has been shown to modulate gene expression in animal studies; however, the effect in humans is not known. Hence, we aimed to compare the effect of intake of krill oil, lean and fatty fish...
Article
Full-text available
Fish consumption and supplementation with n -3 fatty acids reduce CVD risk. Krill oil is an alternative source of marine n -3 fatty acids and few studies have investigated its health effects. Thus, we compared krill oil supplementation with the intake of fish with similar amounts of n -3 fatty acids on different cardiovascular risk markers. In an 8...
Article
Fish oil (FO) supplementation reduces the risk of CVD. However, it is not known if FO of different qualities have different effects on lipoprotein subclasses in humans. We aimed at investigating the effects of oxidised FO and high-quality FO supplementation on lipoprotein subclasses and their lipid concentrations in healthy humans. In all, fifty-fo...

Citations

... Calvo-Lerma et al. (2019) raised concerns over the use of oxidized palm oil (derived from heating the oil), which has been associated with cytotoxic damage and an increased risk of cancer [19]. Canadian recommendations for fat intake for adults 19 years of age and older is 20 to 35% of the daily energy intake, and high intakes of saturated fats have been strongly associated with cardiovascular disease [31]. Thus, it is desirable to keep saturated fatty acid intakes below the recommended values. ...
... The effect of yoghurt may be mediated by microbiota modification in a healthier direction. This is consistently described for yoghurt, with less evidence for other dairy products [36], partially explaining why results for other dairy products-mainly the non-fermented ones-are less consistent [27], thus resulting in the categorization of dairy products into specific food groups [37]. ...
... The dietary pattern of a high intake of fish (Figures 8 and 9) [13,14,20] results in the high consumption of long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as EPA and DHA in Japan compared with the U.S. (Figure 5) [13,14]. Dietary intake of EPA/DHA is associated with a decreased risk of obesity and cardiovascular disease [23,42] because high consumers of fatty fish developed a favorable HDL-cholesterol-related lipoprotein profile and antiinflammatory phenotype than low consumers of fatty fish [42]. The anti-inflammatory properties of EPA/DHA are caused by the production of protectin, which reduces morbidity and mortality from COVID-19 infection [42,43]. ...
... Undoubtedly, the type of patient, as well as the time of the dietary intervention and the type of diets, influences the results in the literature. For example, in the SYSDIET study with a Nordic isocaloric diet in patients with metabolic syndrome [32], modifications in gene expression were detected in inflammatory pathways. Some studies have demonstrated that Mediterranean-style diets include different dietary components [33,34], which have been reported to exert beneficial biological effects, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, antitumoral, antilipemic, antidiabetic, and antiobesity activities. ...
... [36][37][38] However, we have previously reported minor effects on circulating inflammatory markers after intake of a protein-enriched milk in older adults, [39] although the same protein-enriched milk altered PBMC expression of genes related to immune function. [40] Cheese is also rich in calcium, which has been shown to suppress inflammatory stress. [41] This may explain why cheese that contained seven times more calcium than sour cream induced a more anti-inflammatory PBMC gene expression response. ...
... Narverud et al. recently studied the immunological and inflammatory pathways involved in early atherosclerosis, showing that LDL-C plays a key role in modulating the expression of several immune-related genes. New data on the involvement of these pathways in early atherosclerosis may represent future therapeutic targets for the prevention of atherosclerotic progression [56]. In the last few decades, several studies have been conducted on the usefulness of novel biochemical cardiovascular biomarkers in risk stratification of children with HF. ...
... Drug therapy may also be warranted in some patients, but this is beyond the scope of these nutrition CPGs. Given the large interindividual variability observed in plasma TG responsiveness to EPA+DHA (18,28,29), nutrigenetic testing can help evaluate which patients will benefit the most from EPA+DHA consumption for TG management. Moreover, providing a "one-size fits all" recommendation for all patients to consume EPA+DHA to reduce TG may have undesirable effects and risks for approximately one third of the population, who have been shown to be non-responders, or adverse responders (i.e., exhibit increases in TG) to EPA+DHA intake for TG changes (25,26). ...
... A clinical trial study that was performed on the healthy Nordic diet, revealed that it altered the expression of genes related to mitochondrial function and thereby reduced ROS production in PBMcs form patients with metabolic syndrome. Apart from the involvement of genes that encode proteins of the ETc, the Nordic diet has been shown to downregulated both NRF1 and NRF2 levels, suggesting a reduction in the oxidative burst (203) (Table V). Following the hypothesis that the Nordic diet contains similar ingredients with the Medd, similar effects are expected in future studies concerning other aspects of mitochondrial physiology. ...
... Thirdly, since each participant serves as his or her own control, fewer subjects are required to achieve a similar statistical power [46]. The 8-week duration of the diet period was chosen as this time frame was sufficient to incorporate EPA+DHA into tissues [47] and to induce notable effects in the lipid profile [8] and inflammation [48]. A washout period of 8 weeks allowed to reduce the possible carry-over effect from the crossover study design, as indicated by the insignificant changes between the baseline values of YSS and salmon. ...
... Drug therapy may also be warranted in some patients, but this is beyond the scope of these nutrition CPGs. Given the large interindividual variability observed in plasma TG responsiveness to EPA+DHA (18,28,29), nutrigenetic testing can help evaluate which patients will benefit the most from EPA+DHA consumption for TG management. Moreover, providing a "one-size fits all" recommendation for all patients to consume EPA+DHA to reduce TG may have undesirable effects and risks for approximately one third of the population, who have been shown to be non-responders, or adverse responders (i.e., exhibit increases in TG) to EPA+DHA intake for TG changes (25,26). ...