Allan Young's research while affiliated with McGill University and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Research in the United States tends to attribute low rates of use of mental health services by immigrants to economic barriers. The purpose of our study was to examine this issue in the context of Canada's universal health care system. A survey of the catchment area of a comprehensive clinic in Montreal interviewed random samples of 924 Canadian-bo...
Article
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This article summarizes the rationale, development and application of the McGill Illness Narrative Interview (MINI), a theoretically driven, semistructured, qualitative interview protocol designed to elicit illness narratives in health research. The MINI is sequentially structured with three main sections that obtain: (1) A basic temporal narrative...
Article
The evolutionary theory of the concept of mental disorder as harmful dysfunction that J. C. Wakefield (1999) proposed (a) does not correspond to how the term disorder is used in psychiatric nosology or in clinicians' everyday practice; (b) does not cover the territory to which the term reasonably could be applied; and (c) is not especially useful f...
Article
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The cross-cultural prevalence of somatization and the limitations of current nosology and psychiatric theory for interpreting cultural variations in somatization are reviewed. Selective review was conducted of recent research literature and research findings from an epidemiological survey and ethnographic study of help-seeking and health care utili...
Technical Report
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We conducted a community survey of the general population in an urban multicultural neighborhood (Côte des Neiges), defined as the catchment area of a community clinic (CLSC). The focus was on three groups of immigrants to Canada (Anglophone Caribbeans, Vietnamese and Filipinos) and Canadian-born comparaison groups. The objectives included: (1) to...
Article
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About a century ago, George Crile, a surgeon and experimental physiologist, suggested that the meaning of pain could be discovered in the context of evolution. Pain is a signal of a physical injury that would be otherwise ignored by the individual, a form of ignorance that would ultimately have mortal consequences. Crile believed that pain has a se...
Article
The explanatory model perspective of medical anthropology emphasizes the cultural shaping of individuals' efforts to make sense of their symptoms and suffering. Causal attribution is a pivotal cognitive process in this personal and social construction of meaning. Cultural variations in symptom attribution affect the pathogenesis, course, clinical p...

Citations

... There is a considerable body of explanatory models and help-seeking literature (Kirmayer et al. 1996;Weiss et al. 1992;Weiss 1997;Cauce et al. 2002), but despite the importance of religious-oriented help-seeking and clergy response to mental illness (Wang et al. 2003;Weaver et al. 2003), the subject has received little attention beyond that of the anthropological literature on indigenous and religious healers in developing societies (Teuton et al. 2007;Ensink and Robertson 1999). However, globalisation and rapid expansion of new migrant communities, particularly in Western cities, should predict a profusion of religio-cultural conceptualisations of mental illness. ...
... On the other hand, post-traumatic symptoms and distress are frequent, especially in asylum seekers and refugees 9 . Beyond the categorical diagnosis, diagnostic tools developed in western countries may not be sufficient to detect specific aspects and symptoms of psychological problems in people grown in different cultural contexts 10 . As a result, there is a tendency in the clinical practice to mis-diagnose and overuse the "Not Otherwise Specified" (NOS) specification in migrant patients with blurred symptomatology that are, perhaps, not entirely understood through the language of classical taxonomic diagnostics 11,12 . ...
... Based on Halliday's research, Hu (1994), classified context into three types: linguistic context, situational context, and cultural context. This classification of contexts helps comprehend the meaning of discourse and the communicational intention (Dickson et al., 2003;Kirmayer et al., 1995). The analysis of spoken, written, or sign language use, as well as any major semiotic event, can be done through discourse analysis, also known as discourse studies. ...
... Traumatic events can reduce people's sense of safety, remind them of the reality of death and have negative effects on their mental health. When it comes to somatic symptoms, physical symptoms are also the most common individual expressions of social problems and emotional distress among different cultural groups (Kirmayer and Young 1998). Moreover, coercive life events and comorbid psychiatric disorders often lead to exacerbation of somatic symptoms (Katon et al. 2001). ...
... Algunas de estas ideas podrían ser encontradas de cierta manera en otros modelos en salud mental y filosofía. Por ejemplo, en el psicoanálisis relacional (Stolorow et al., 1994), la terapia de la forma (Koehler, 1992), la psicopatología fenomenológica (Fulford et al., 2013;Stanghellini et al., 2019), el pragmatismo (Dewey, 1991;James, 2017), la terapia sistémica-cibernética (Bateson, 1972;Bertrando y Lini, 2021) y la psiquiatría cultural y social (Kirmayer y Young, 1999;Morgan y Bhugra, 2010). Esto es concordante con las diversas inspiraciones del enfoque enactivo en su génesis. ...
... The goal of the study was to and identify the needs and vulnerabilities regarding perceptions and experiences of trauma within the Bachelor of Nursing (BN) and Bachelor of Science in Psychiatric Nursing (BScPN) student populations within a western Canadian province. The McGill Illness Narrative Interview (MINI) methodology developed by Groleau et al. [4] derived from medical anthropology was utilized to better understand how, when, and under what circumstances graduates of BN and BScPN programs self-identify as being 'traumatized', and/or act on their experiences and feelings of clinical-related 'trauma'. All participants in the study described events that were deemed personally traumatic. ...
... While a wide range of evidence proves migrants are more vulnerable to mental health problems than non-migrants (1)(2)(3)(4)(5), migrants are more reluctant to seek mental healthcare in conventional healthcare services (6-8). This reluctance is related to a complex interplay of socio-demographic factors (e.g., gender, age, education), socio-economic factors (e.g., nancial barriers, limited access to health insurance), structural and logistical factors (e.g., legal status de ning healthcare access, language barriers, system of consultancy appointments) and sociocultural factors (7,(9)(10)(11)(12). The latter are strongly embedded in the explanatory models of illnesses (13) that immigrant communities hold. ...