Allan Collins's research while affiliated with Palo Alto Institute for Research and Education and other places

Publications (10)

Article
Many teaching practices implicitly assume that conceptual knowledge can be abstracted from the situations in which it is learned and used. This article argues that this assumption inevitably limits the effectiveness of such practices. Drawing on recent research into cognition as it is manifest in everyday activity, the authors argue that knowledge...
Chapter
Collins, A., Brown, J.S., & Newman, S.E. (1989). Cognitive apprenticeship: Teaching the crafts of reading, writing, and mathematics. In L. B. Resnick (Ed.) Knowing, learning, and instruction: E...
Article
A unique aspect of computers is that they not only represent process but also naturally keep track of the actions used to carry out a given task, so that the process with its trace can become an object of study in its own right. One effect of this can be seen vividly in the sciences, where computers and computational languages have improved our abi...
Article
: Even today, many complex and important skills, such as those required for language use and social interaction, are learned informally through apprenticeshiplike methods -- i.e., methods involving not didactic teaching, but observation, coaching, and successive approximation while carrying out a variety of tasks and activities. The differences bet...
Article
Bibliography: leaves 31-34 Supported by the National Institute of Education
Article
Includes bibliographical references (p. 25-27) This research was supported by the National Institute of Education under Contract no. US-NIE-C-400-81-0030 and the Office of Naval Research under Contract No. N00014-85-C-0026

Citations

... Collins et al. [15] posited that "apprenticeship embeds the learning of skills and knowledge in the social and functional context of their use" (p. 1). This focuses not just on "how to do," that is, the mechanical steps involved in completing a task, but "how to think" through and develop an understanding of tasks within a complex social environment [6,14,15]. ...
... The pedagogical foundations underpinning CoPs are also embodied in the Cognitive Apprenticeship Model [83], in that the latter approach to learning is also a social and collaborative process whereby knowledge is acquired and contextually tied to the settings and situations in which it is learnt. Similar to a CoP, learning in this context is guided by the expertise of a more knowledgeable and/or respected other who encourages and challenges learners to solve problems with critical thinking and kinaesthetic ability -in the same way an apprentice learns a trade under the supervision of a master tradesperson [83][84][85]. ...
... While existing research has provided critical conceptual perspectives on the place of leadership standards in university settings (English, 2003(English, , 2006Gronn, 2002;Pavlakis & Kelley, 2016), and explored how leadership standards shape the experience and practice of school principals (Militello et al., 2013;Riveros et al., 2016), our interests are in understanding how faculty members navigate relationships of scholarship and practice in a context influenced by leadership standards. We report here on a study of instructional practices in a Master of Education program in educational leadership redesigned to meet certification requirements for the Alberta Leadership Quality Standard (Alberta Education, 2020), and how these practices, accessed as examples of cognitive apprenticeship (Collins et al., 1989(Collins et al., , 1991, and viewed through the lens of policy enactment (Ball, 1993(Ball, , 2015Ball et al., 2011Ball et al., , 2012Maguire et al., 2015), negotiated scholarly, practical, and regulatory interests in the development of school leaders. In asking how instructors negotiate compatibilities and tensions between theoretical insights and practical competency requirements, we also explore how instructors, as policy actors, negotiate leadership standards, not just as policies of compliance, but of possibility. ...
... These language learning apps tap into learners' digital intelligence (Mithas & McFarlan, 2017). Like websites, apps have promises to provide learners with multimodality and situated learning, which highlights learners' interaction in a particular context to enhance the quality of learning (Brown, Collins, & Duguid, 1989;Herrington & Oliver, 2000;Lave & Wenger, 1991). Another critical point in language learning apps is that language apps through situated learning make learning experiences more purposeful and contextualize learning experiences (Herrington & Oliver, 2000). ...
... A number of studies have shown the perception of interpersonal connections with peers to be an important factor in the success of online learning3637383940. Social interaction provides opportunities to make internal thought processes public, or make thinking visible, which is seen as a prerequisite for knowledge building [41]. In a social learning environment, where knowledge is constructed as part of a group, the support of other students in the group is vital to encourage learners to take risks, pose questions, ask for clarification, and share their ideas with the group. ...
... The development of projects is guided by the 4 'Ps' of creative learning: Projects, Passion, Peers and Play. The students are supported when working on projects they are passionate about, in collaboration with peers, in a playful context that encourages experimentation (Schmidt et al., 2014), (Brown et al., 1989), (Lave and Wenger, 1991). This process is structured to support students in finding different personal learning paths as they create community through shared experiences (Gabaree et al., 2018). ...
... In education literature, mentoring is one of the most effective strategies for mentees to improve technical skills centered on a complicated job. By completing daily tasks alongside professional mentors, mentees develop cognitive processes that aid in problem-solving and show the validity of their understanding [13]. In addition, when used in conjunction with real-world work, mentoring aids in the development of communication skills such as explaining, persuading, bargaining, and establishing understanding [54]. ...
... Reflect Reflection is the last stage in ill-structured problemsolving process. During this stage, learner revisits ideas, process, adopted strategies, and solutions (Collins & Brown, 1988;Kim & Hannafin, 2011). Learning occurs when learners reflect on their own mistakes, make plans for improvement, and prepare for knowledge transfer in other contexts. ...
... Accordingly, comprehension occurs when the individual's schemata, or existing knowledge, is activated. Not only does critical thinking explains how schemata are activated and how new ones are constructed (Norris & Philip, 1987), but critical thinking skills does actually activate the schemata (Collins et al., 1980). On another level, a number of studies proved that teaching critical thinking skills to learners influences of positively their reading comprehension (Karimi & Veisi, 2016;Nikoopour et al., 2011;Kamali & Fahmi, 2011;Hashemi & Zabihi, 2012). ...