Alison Wood Brooks's research while affiliated with Harvard University and other places

Publications (10)

Article
Full-text available
Individuals belong to multiple groups across various domains of life, which in aggregate constitute a portfolio of potentially distinct levels of experienced status. We propose a two-factor model for assessing the effects of an individual’s status portfolio, based on status average (mean status level across groups) and status variance (degree to wh...
Article
Organizational culture profoundly influences how employees think and behave. Established research suggests that the content, intensity, consensus, and fit of cultural norms act as a social control system for attitudes and behavior. We adopt the norms model of organizational culture to elucidate whether organizational culture can influence how emplo...
Article
Across eight experiments, we demonstrate that humor can influence status, but attempting to use humor is risky. The successful use of humor can increase status in both new and existing relationships, but unsuccessful humor attempts (e.g., inappropriate jokes) can harm status. The relationship between the successful use of humor and status is mediat...
Article
Across three studies, we demonstrate that anxiety is both commonly associated with negotiations and harmful to negotiator performance. In our experiments, we induced either low anxiety or high anxiety. Compared to negotiators experiencing low levels of anxiety, negotiators who experience high levels of anxiety make steeper concessions and exit barg...
Article
Though negotiation scholars have generally recommended that negotiators suppress their expressions of emotion, extant research has pointed to the expression of emotions as a powerful strategy in negotiations. For example, Ho and Andrade (2010) suggest that people tend to use the expression of emotions to their advantage in one-shot games and are fu...
Article
Emotions can powerfully influence negotiations. In this paper, we describe how negotiators regulate their emotions. We demonstrate that individuals often perceive negotiations in competitive terms and believe that feeling angry during a negotiation confers a strategic advantage. Across four studies, we find that individuals deliberately increase or...

Citations

... This transient episode of anxiety, triggered by a threatening or uncertain situation, is referred to as state anxiety. State anxiety is short in duration, unlike mood or other forms of dispositional affect [19], and is particularly important in the transfer of emotion in communication because anxiety is functional and "can facilitate constructive behavior" [19]. For example, in response to situation-specific threats, anxious individuals are more likely to detect and recognize potential threats, protect themselves or others, and in general, become more vigilant [20]. ...
... Spooner (2020) noted that one comment frequently given to Deaf writers, is that they are told they are "good writers" with the unstated follow up "for a deaf person." Such microaggressions lead to reduced motivation and self-doubt about their writing abilities (Sezer et al., 2018). Therefore, Deaf students miss the opportunities to learn and become comfortable with academic writing, which prevents them from publishing articles. ...
... Although few studies have directly linked specific achievements to earned social rank, successful and accomplished individuals tend to acquire high status in stable, long-term social groups (e.g., Cheng et al., 2010;Faunce, 1984;Henrich & Gil-White, 2001;Miyamoto et al., 2018;Van Vugt, 2006). Similarly, among newly acquainted individuals, status is often granted to those who are considered intelligent, useful, and successful in achieving their goals (e.g., Anderson et al., 2012;Bitterly et al., 2017;Cheng et al., 2013). Indeed, numerous studies have demonstrated that accomplished individuals are those who hold high social rank in the eyes of others, suggesting that individual achievements increase one's social rank. ...
... Feelings of nervousness harm performance by disrupting task-focused thinking (Irwin Sarason 1984) and by motivating people to make expedient choices to exit their current situation (Alison Wood and Schweitzer 2010). ...