Algirdas Julien Greimas's scientific contributions

Publications (16)

Article
Traduction de « Le contrat de veridiction » paru dans « Man and World », 1980, 13, pp. 345-355. 1. Plausibilite et veracite. 2. Le contrat social. 3. La verification et sa crise. 4. La manipulation discursive. 5. Verite et certitude. PP. 661-677, D. MADDOX : « Veridiction, Verification, Verifactions : Reflections on Methodology »
Article
Traducción de: Sémiotique: dictionnaire raisonné de la théorie du langage Reimpresión en 1990 Incluye bibliografía e índice

Citations

... To be revealed to the observer, this system requires "an examination of the semiotic processthat is of the 'visual texts'by which it realizes itself" (Ibid., 637). To make sense of such processes, Greimas developed the so-called semiotic square (Greimas and Courtés 1976;Greimas and Rastier 1968), a tool through which we can formalize the relations between signs. Here, so-called disjunction, conjunction and complementarity allow for reconstructing the narrative that is embedded in a given image. ...
... Greimas and Courtès 1976), and may be closer to such an approach of beyond sentence functional description (cf. Greimas 1989, for the description of a tale). ...
... What we find interesting is that this tendency-assimilating project or process language-even occurs in confidential interview situations where it would be possible to speak more frankly about the intentions of research(ers). Here, in line with structuralist and cognitivist assumptions, rhetorical practice clearly interacts with and pre-structures thinking [62,63]. ...
... My adoption of this literal-allegorical distinction follows literary critic Fredric Jameson [35][36][37][38]. To execute the allegorical reading, I will appeal, following Jameson, to Algirdas Greimas's semiotic method [25][26][27][28][29]. But to read the trial record at either level requires locating it geographically. ...
... Nemo's different accents, which depend on the life and love interest he chooses, therefore create a set of negative oppositions that enables the spectator to differentiate between the lives with Anna, Elise and Jeanne. However, cinema is primarily a visual language and we should also consider what Floch, in adapting André Lhote's term, calls the 'visual invariants ' [2000: 35-36], of what Greimas calls the plastic categories, i.e. "the "minimal" units of the [visual] signifier" [Greimas 1989: 639] 1 , of a visual object. Visual invariants are therefore "differential and recognized traits; and they are so because of their variables of realization because they are prone to being traits relevant to the form of expression of a visual identity" [Floch 2000: 36]. ...
... In Sulkunen and Törrönen's model (1997a) pragmatic modalities belong to the level of utterance, that is the level of the story or statements, which is distinguished from the level of enunciation referring to the acts of language use and stances adopted in relation to statements (Greimas, Courtés & Rengstorf, 1989; c.f. Sulkunen & Törrönen, 1997b). 50 In my analysis, however, I did not directly follow these distinctions. ...
... We propose a different approach to defining fine wine consumers by using the semiotic square [16] to identify consumer groups while also using the identity prism to position a fine wine brand by its values and brand meanings [17]. The luxury fashion industry, especially in Europe, uses the semiotic The semiotic square suggests that we can define these four groups by how they can be compared to the other groups. ...
... Language is both an object of philosophy and linguistics, and so is a metalanguage. In linguistics, many scholars such as Louis Hjelmslev (1961), Algirdas Judien Greimas (1982), Roman Jacobson (1960) and many others believe that metalanguage is an important concept in linguistic research. Louis Hjelmslev (1961) sought to build an ideal meta-semiology which object would be signs in semiotics. ...
... 2. The "senses of space" (the meanings that can be attributed to a particular spatial configuration) are always produced and then interpreted by a "subjectivity". Space can be considered as a "constructed object" that acquires meaning only from the point of view of a "subject" that produces and consumes it (Greimas 1976;Greimas, Courtés 1979;Hammad 2006). Since the point is to imagine a spatial configuration capable of communicating across centuries, it is important to emphasize that both subjects involved (the producer of the message and its interpreter) have a relationship to the spatial message that is both "pre-personal" insofar as it depends on the way our bodily schemas are involved in our experience of space (which is also a perceptual, proprioceptive, motor, and psychophysical one), 5 and "supra-individual," insofar as it involves social and cultural codes about spatiality. ...
... The topic was brilliantly and minutely analysed in the dissertation thesis by Tyler Bennett (2021a). As Bennett points out, we can find such reversed order in the works by Greimas and Courtés (1982) under the term 'reciprocal presupposition' . Bennett uses the term retroactivity. ...