Alfred C. Kinsey's scientific contributions

Citations

... Sexual orientation was evaluated using a modified version of the Kinsey's Scale (Kinsey et al., 1998(Kinsey et al., , 1948. Compared to the original version, the terms ''heterosexual'' and ''homosexual'' were replaced by ''attracted by a person with the opposite gender identity'' and ''attracted by a person with the same gender identity''. ...
... Крюковой) [19]. Третья часть состояла из вопросов об особенностях сексуального поведения: о частоте и продолжительности просмотра порно, предпочитаемых жанрах, времени суток просмотра, форматах и порно-ресурсах, сексуальной идентичности респондентов (варианты ответов соответствовали шкале Кинси [20,21]), отношении к мастурбации, использовании ее во время просмотра порно, о том, считают ли респонденты, что у них есть порнозависимость, наличии постоянного сексуального партнера, удовлетворенности своей внешностью. ...
... Information about participants' sexual attraction was elicited using a modified Kinsey scale (0 = attracted to neither men nor women, 1 = to only men, 7 = to only women; Kinsey et al., 1948Kinsey et al., , 1953Sell, 1996). Participants also had the option to say that "they needed more categories" and thereby access additional scales for highlighting attraction to trans or cis individuals (women, men, and non-binary) and preferences for masculine and feminine appearances. ...
... She starts by criticizing the need to find one story to explain the wide variety human sexuality-Freud's Oedipal complex receives special criticism for omitting the queer parts of Oedipus' story-and instead looks to the whole panorama of Greek myths as potential models for different paths to adult sexuality. She also uses Kinsey's model of a continuum of sexuality, from homosexuality on one end of the scale to heterosexuality on the other (Kinsey et al., 1998), and argues that there can be defensive and healthy routes to all points on this continuum, using the work of Chodorow on compromise formations in heterosexuality (Chodorow, 1992). She leaves room for biological predispositions to particular ranges on the spectrum, but also explores different "family romances" which can influence object choice in a psychodynamic model of sexuality, meaning that her model can be seen within the context of biopsychosocial models of sexuality which were developing at this time (Denman, 2003). ...
... or non-orthodox), and familiarity with homosexual men or women (dichotomized as yes or no) were assessed. Participants' sexual orientation was measured via the Kinsey scale (Kinsey et al., 1948;Kinsey, 1953). Participants were asked to rate their sexual orientation via a scale ranging from 0 ("exclusively heterosexual") to 6 ("exclusively homosexual"). ...
... The evolution of both long-and short-term mating strategies give rise to the sociosexuality dimension, which has three facets, namely attitudes, behavior and desires, where some people tend toward longterm and others toward short-term mating (Kinsey et al., 1948;Simpson & Gangestad, 1992). More specifically, individuals who score low in this dimension, are said to possess a restricted sociosexual orientation i. e., they tend toward monogamy and prolonged courtship. ...
... Therefore, findings related to reward anticipation, reward valuation, and reward learning while promising are for now still limited to one demographic subgroup. Notably, sexual orientation is assessed dimensionally (via the Kinsey scale; [84]) and reported transparently in most studies, which is not the case for gender identity. The current lack of measurement and reporting of sample gender information [85] makes it difficult to know for example whether trans and/or nonbinary individuals were included and whether the authors assessed sex assigned at birth (suggested by the use of "male"/ "female" terminology) or gender identity ("men"/ "women" terminology). ...
... Participants were asked about their age, gender and other sociodemographic information. Moreover, sexual orientation was assessed by the Kinsey Scale (Kinsey, 1948), in which participants rate their sexual orientation on a 5-point Likert scale (1 ¼ exclusively heterosexual; 5 ¼ exclusively homosexual). ...