Alain Phélizon's scientific contributions

Publications (11)

Article
Full-text available
Saniwa is an extinct genus of varanid squamate from the Eocene of North America and Europe. Up to now, only one poorly known species, Saniwa orsmaelensis Dollo, 1923, has been reported from Europe. Diagnostic material was limited to vertebrae with only preliminary description and no figure provided, except of one dorsal vertebra that was designated...
Article
Here we describe the lizard fauna from the locality of Montchenot (Paris Basin, late Paleocene, MP6). This material can be allocated to five major clades: Scincoidea, Lacertoidea (?Lacertidae), Amphisbaenia, Anguimorpha (?Anguidae and Shinisauridae). The assemblage from Monchenot is dominated by small lizard specimens and appears as highly sorted....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Paris Basin has delivered important faunas of fossil mammals from the Thanetian. A rich sample of Late Paleocene mammals has recently been collected from the Marnes de Montchenot in the Montagne de Reims (Marne, France). Study of the new fauna and comparisons with collections from other localities (Cernay, Berru) result in the identification of...
Article
We present new species of an enigmatic family of mammals, which is endemic to Europe, the Paroxyclaenidae: Merialus bruneti sp. nov., Fratrodon tresvauxi gen. et sp. nov., Paraspaniella gunnelli gen. et sp. nov., and Sororodon tresvauxae gen. et sp. nov. The fossils described come from six localities of the Ypresian of the Paris Basin (France): Pou...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Saniwa is an extinct genus of varanid lizard from the Eocene of North America and Europe. It is the sister taxon to the crown-group Varanus. Up to now, only one poorly known species is recognized from Europe, Saniwa orsmaelensis from the earliest Eocene of Dormaal, Belgium. This species originally named by Louis Dollo nearly a century ago, is the e...
Article
Full-text available
Plesiadapid mammals (Eutheria, Euarchonta, Plesiadapiformes) are well represented in the late Paleocene to early Eocene of Europe (reference levels MP6, MP7 and MP8+9), but relationships among the described species and their links to North American plesiadapids remain disputed. To better understand the evolution of the group in Europe, to explore i...
Article
Full-text available
A diversified fauna of fossil mammals is described from the Thanetian Marnes de Montchenot near Reims (France, Paris Basin). The new fauna is composed mainly of micromammals, which are represented by isolated teeth and a few more complete dental remains. Multituberculates, insectivore-like mammals and louisinine “condylarths” are particularly commo...

Citations

... As indicated by both the FAD/LAD and the percentage of renewal (Supporting Information, Texts S1-S2), the Ypresian as a whole was a period of instability for carnivorous mammal diversitynotably for hyaenodonts, which experienced higher turnover rates than carnivoramorphans. Other clades underwent profound changes as well, illustrated by the disappearances of viverravids and oxyaenids around 54-52 Mya (Intra-Ypresian Mammal Turnover; Solé et al., 2011Solé et al., , 2019b mesonychids at the end of the Ypresian (c. 48 Mya; Ypresian-Lutetian Mammal Turnover; Solé et al., 2018Solé et al., , 2019b (Figs 1B, 5). ...
... Four of these North American species have been interpreted as representing a stratophenetic succession through which middle Tiffanian species evolved into later Tiffanian and Clarkforkian taxa (Gingerich, 1975(Gingerich, , 1976. Alternatively, more recent phylogenetic analyses have yielded a basal polytomy for species of Chiromyoides, providing no apparent resolution of relationships within the genus (Boyer et al., 2012a(Boyer et al., , 2012bJehle et al., 2018). However, these recent phylogenetic analyses did not include two of the six North American species of Chiromyoides known at that time (C. ...
... M. Barbatodon oardaensis, right p4 UBB Ng2-01, Negoiu (site RM2), Rusca Montană Basin (from Codrea et al., 2017a). N. Barbatodon transylvanicus, left Jehle et al., 2012), or else multituberculates disappeared altogether with the advent of the more derived, modern placental orders (e.g., Smith et al., 2014), following an important dispersal-related faunal turnover near the Paleocene-Eocene boundary (e.g., Hooker and Collinson, 2012;De Bast and Smith, 2017). ...