Akemi Kaneda's research while affiliated with Leiden University and other places

Publications (5)

Article
Tell Begum was previously explored by Iraqi archaeologists in the 1960s when excavations revealed a multi-period site. Among the key finds were Halaf period remains that are relatively rare in the region of the Shahrizor plain and included polychrome ceramics suggesting a local variation of the Halaf culture. Recent investigations and excavations i...
Article
Full-text available
At Tell Sabi Abyad, Syria, radiocarbon dating previously provided a robust chronology for the 7th-early 6th millennium BC, the Late Neolithic. The continuous inhabitation spans the 8.2 ka climate event. This chronology has been used here in a study of stable isotope (13C and 15N) data of animal bones. This is the first isotope study undertaken on m...
Article
Full-text available
At Tell Sabi Abyad, Syria, we obtained a robust chronology for the 7th to early 6th millennium BC, the Late Neolithic. The chronology was obtained using a large set of radiocarbon dates, analyzed by Bayesian statistics. Cultural changes observed at ∼ 6200 BC are coeval with the 8.2 ka climate event. The inhabitation remained continuous. © 2011 by t...

Citations

... Walter Cruells has usefully brought together the available evidence for the Late Neolithic in the Syrian Euphrates Valley, applying periodizations derived from recent excavations in the region (Cruells, Molist, and Tunca 2004); Tekin (2017) has done similarly helpful work for the Turkish Upper Tigris Valley. A dedicated focus on Late Neolithic settlement patterns continues today in the mountainous Iraqi Kurdistan region (Altaweel et al. 2013;Gavagnin, Iamoni, and Palermo 2016;Morandi Bonacossi and Iamoni 2015;Nieuwenhuyse, Akkermans et al. 2016;Saber et al. 2014;Tsuneki et al. 2015;Ur et al. 2013). ...
... It is nevertheless important to emphasize the great archeological uncertainties that remain concerning the definition, or even the existence, of the HUT phase (e.g. Campbell, 2007;Campbell and Fletcher, 2010;Gómez-Bach et al., 2016;Nieuwenhuyse et al., 2016). The Iraqi sites of Yarim Tepe II and I excavated by Soviet archeologists in the 1970s yielded respectively 23 and 9 archeointensity values, from nine and eight different archeological levels (or building horizons). ...
... several sites from southcentral (Çatalh€ oyük: 7500e6000 cal BC) and south-eastern (Çay€ onü Tepesi, 9the7th mil. cal BC) Anatolia and northern Syria (Tell Sabi Abyad, 6800e5800 cal BC) have been subjected to bone collagen carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis (Pearson et al., 2007Pearson et al., , 2013Pearson et al., , 2015 van Der Plicht et al., 2012). Most data concern sheep/goat, while cattle and pig are less documented. ...
... Usually, the buildings were filled in to change them into "platforms" on which the subsequent building was reconstructed in almost identical manner and layout ( fig. 3). This resulted in alternating building-platform-building sequences that grew upwards over several human generations (Akkermans, Brüning, and Kaneda 2011). Significantly, some of these sequences at Tell Sabi Abyad continued through the crucial Early Neolithic (or PPNB) to Late Neolithic (or Pottery Neolithic) threshold without interruption. ...
... These gaps relating to the impact of this cold event on local environments are problematic given that there have been a number of attempts to link the '8.2 ka event' to changes in past human societies, with cooling and drying being argued to have stimulated behavioural or settlement responses 15,16 . In the Middle East, a 300-year period of drying and cooling has been associated with economic and cultural changes leading to an increase in social stratification and urbanism in the region 17 . Aridity at ~ 8.2 ka has also been correlated with changes in settlement patterns and human subsistence in North and East Africa 18 . ...