Aguilar, F.V., Jr's research while affiliated with Ateneo de Manila University and other places

Publications (5)

Article
This concluding article identifies some of the salient themes that run across the articles in this special double issue on “Disasters in History.” The common themes include (a) disasters as catalysts of different types of change in society, the state, and science; (b) the relationship between disasters and social inequality; (c) the attribution to...
Article
In contrast to the literature’s dominant focus on Western constructions of tropicality, this article explores representations of the tropics by the colonized, specifically the climatological conditions of the Philippines as portrayed in the late nineteenth century by the Europe-based native intellectuals known as ilustrados. Their anticolonial sent...
Article
By revisiting the eruptions of Taal in 1911, Hibok-Hibok in 1951, and Pinatubo in 1991, this article interrogates Greg Bankoff’s argument that “cultures of disaster” in the Philippines produce “coping mechanisms” manifested in public apathy and the state’s failure at mitigation. It argues for historical contingency as illustrated by the relative su...
Article
The most contentious issue in the Revolutionary Congress that crafted the 1899 Malolos Constitution pertained to the separation of church and state, which won by a mere one vote. Until now this episode in Philippine history has not received a satisfactory explanation, which this article seeks to offer. The debate in Malolos, as argued here, was pro...

Citations

... In terms of local knowledge, a great number of authors dedicated their time to providing substantial information significant in this current study. It ranges from written accounts [10,11], oral narratives [12], local materials and methods [13] to cultural ways [14]. However, the revelation that indigenous knowledge in schools and training programs with various stakeholders have different characteristics and challenges, and they could transfer it from generation to generation [15]. ...
... The weather logic of the Brindisas charted aboveleaves one immediately beset by the question of intent. Although contemporary scholars can critique the contradictory and problematic maneuvers of Rizal's logic (Mojares 2002;Aguilar, 2016;) and comparative flaws shared by early colonial thinkers from other cultures can be found (Scott, 2004), to my mind, a fair judgement of intent must be weighed against the historical considerations which this intent both speaks to and/or contradicts. Why did this conception of traveling weather matter to the ilustrados? ...
... In many ways, I shouldn't have been surprised: Lipka (2015) says over 80% of Filipinos and that nearly two-thirds of U.S. based Filipinos identify as Roman Catholic. As Aguilar (2015) explains, the deep-seated roots of Roman Catholicism of the Philippines can be traced back to Spanish colonization of the fledgling country. Since then, Catholicism continues to structure Filipinos' understanding of their world. ...