Adam Wei's scientific contributions

Publications (2)

Article
Full-text available
Changes to British Columbia’s lodgepole pine forests due to the mountain pine beetle (mpb) outbreak will affect stand water balances, hillslope hydrology, and streamflow in many watersheds. The magnitude of this disturbance has prompted a range of research at both stand and watershed scales to address uncertainty about the hydrologic effects of mpb...
Article
Full-text available
As the mountain pine beetle (MPB) infestation expands into the southern interior, changes to British Columbia's lodgepole pine forests will affect stand water balances, hillslope hydrology and streamflow in many watersheds. The large spatial extent of this disturbance has prompted research from the stand-to watershed-scales to address uncertainty a...

Citations

... In contrast, non-standreplacing disturbances (e.g., insect infestation and tree die-off) often produce gradual changes in forest structures, and consequently induce variable and gradual hydrological responses (Goeking and Tarboton, 2020). A good example is mountain pine beetle (MPB) infestations that often move through phases of initial attack (green phase), tree death when the trees turn red (red phase) and a period where the needles fall off the tree (grey phase) followed by regrowth of surviving trees and saplings (McEwen et al., 2020;Winkler et al., 2010;Redding et al. 2008). Cumulative forest disturbances refer to the addition of multiple disturbance types over space and/or accumulation of the same disturbance type repeating over time (Scherer, 2011). ...
... The MPB infestation has the potential to cause severe (>30%) forest mortality over extensive subbasins of the Okanagan where lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), the primary host of MPB, dominates (Aukema et al. 2006; MacLauclan et al. 2008; Ministry of Forests and Range 2008). The large scale of these changes may cause unprecedented alteration of the timing, magnitude and quality of surface runoff (Redding et al. 2008), changes which are of particular concern to water managers in the Basin (Uunila et al. 2006). Along with changes in water supply, many changes in water demand are predicted for the Okanagan Basin. ...