Adam B. Jaffe's research while affiliated with Queensland University of Technology and other places

Publications (36)

Article
Encouraging disclosure is important for the patent system, yet the technical information in patent applications is often inadequate. We use algorithms from computational linguistics to quantify the effectiveness of disclosure in patent applications. Relying on the expectation that universities have more ability and incentive to disclose their inven...
Article
Previous research suggests creative ability peaks at ages between the mid 30s and early 40s, but has not focused on the role of age-related changes in cognitive abilities in this pattern. Cognitive processes show aging-related increases in experience-based knowledge (pragmatics or crystallized abilities) and decreases in the ability to process nove...
Article
We analyze whether research funding contests promote co-authorship. Our analysis combines Scopus publication records with data on the Marsden Fund, the premier source of funding for basic research in New Zealand. We use fixed-effect models to analyze within-researcher-pair variation in co-authorship. Among pairs who ever co-authored or co-proposed,...
Article
Despite the urgent case for bringing new energy technologies to the marketplace, the delivery of these innovations has been frustratingly slow, often taking several decades to develop even the most promising ideas into novel technologies that achieve a significant amount of market penetration. The pathway for delivering new energy technologies is f...
Article
The quality of novel technological innovations is extremely variable, and the ability to measure innovation quality is essential to sensible, evidence-based policy. Patents, an often vital precursor to a commercialised innovation, share this heterogeneous quality distribution. A pertinent question then arises: How should we define and measure paten...
Article
Full-text available
A low-quality patent system threatens to slow the pace of technological progress. Concerns about low patent quality are supported by estimates from litigation studies suggesting that most US patents granted should not have been issued. We propose a new model for measuring patent quality, based on equivalent patent applications submitted to multiple...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ‘quality’ of novel technological innovations is extremely variable, and the ability to measure innovation quality is essential to sensible, evidence-based policy. Patents, an often vital precursor to a commercialised innovation, share this heterogeneous quality distribution. A pertinent question then arises: How should we define and measure pat...
Article
Full-text available
The U.S. government invests more than $50 billion per year in R&D procurement but we know little about the outcomes of these investments. We have traced all the patents arising from government funding since the year 2000. About 1.5 percent of all R&D procurement contracts have led to at least one patent for a total of about 13,000 patents. However,...
Article
Full-text available
We have constructed a fitness parameter, characterizing the intrinsic attractiveness for patents to be cited, from attributes of the associated inventions known at the time a patent is granted. This exogenously obtained fitness is shown to determine the temporal growth of the citation network in conjunction with mechanisms of preferential attachmen...
Preprint
Full-text available
We have constructed a fitness parameter, characterizing the intrinsic attractiveness for patents to be cited, from attributes of the associated inventions known at the time a patent is granted. This exogenously obtained fitness is shown to determine the temporal growth of the citation network in conjunction with mechanisms of preferential attachmen...
Article
Full-text available
We combine survey and administrative data for about 13,000 New Zealand firms from 2005 to 2013 to study intangible investment and firm performance. We find that firm size and moderate competition is associated with higher intangible investment, while firm age is associated with lower intangible investment. Examining firm performance, we find that h...
Article
This paper presents estimates of the depreciation rate of innovations using survey data on revenues associated with Australian patents. Its novelty is twofold. First, it relies on direct observation of the revenue streams of inventions. This is in sharp contrast with previous studies, which all rely on models based on indirect observation and requi...
Article
The paper investigates whether patent fees are an effective mechanism to deter the filing of low-quality patent applications. The study analyzes the effect on patent quality of the Patent Law Amendment Act of 1982, which resulted in a substantial increase in patenting fees at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Results from a series of difference...
Article
Full-text available
We analyze the time evolution of citations acquired by articles from journals of the American Physical Society (PRA, PRB, PRC, PRD, PRE and PRL). The observed change over time in the number of papers published in each journal is considered an exogenously caused variation in citability that is accounted for by a normalization. The appropriately infl...
Article
Full-text available
The last 2 decades have witnessed a dramatic increase in the use of patent citation data in social science research. Facilitated by digitization of the patent data and increasing computing power, a community of practice has grown up that has developed methods for using these data to: measure attributes of innovations such as impact and originality;...
Article
We estimate the impact of the NZ Marsden Fund on research success, by comparing the subsequent performance of funded and unfunded researchers. We control for selection bias using the Marsden panel rankings. We find that funding is associated with a 6%–15% increase in publications and an 11%–22% increase in citation-weighted papers for research team...
Article
Full-text available
We present an analysis of citations accrued over time by patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office in 1998. In contrast to previous studies, a disaggregation by technology category is performed, and exogenously caused citation-number growth is controlled for. Our approach reveals an intrinsic citation rate that clearly separa...
Article
This paper presents estimates of the depreciation rate of innovations using survey data on revenues associated with Australian patents. Its novelty is twofold. First, it relies on direct observation of the revenue streams of inventions. This is in sharp contrast with previous studies, which all rely on models based on indirect observation and requi...
Article
This study examines the impact of government subsidy through R&D grants on innovation output for firms in New Zealand. Using a large database that links administrative and tax data with survey data, we find that R&D grants have a stronger effect on more novel innovation (e.g. applying for a patent or introducing new products to the world) than on i...
Chapter
Innovation is the creation and commercial implementation of a new product or process, often (but not necessarily) based on new technology. Innovation is a major source of private business success and competitive advantage, and is the major long-term source in growth in per capita income in an economy. The innovation process is characterized by a hi...
Chapter
Technology diffusion is the process by which new technologies are adopted for use across individual firms or households in a given market, and across different markets. The most salient facts about this process are that it always plays out over time, and the time before adoption is widespread varies greatly across technologies. The dominant explana...
Article
The problem of global climate change presents overwhelming factual, analytical, and normative challenges. Nordhaus surveys this terrain bravely and mostly successfully. He explains the scientific/economic consensus that the planet is warming, that people are responsible, that the consequences are bad, and that immediate action is benefit/cost justi...
Article
This paper examines the impact of government assistance through R&D grants on innovation output for firms in New Zealand. Using a large database that links administrative and tax data with survey data, we are able to control for large number of firm characteristics and thus minimise selection bias. We find that receipt of an R&D grant significantly...
Article
The paper investigates whether patent fees are an effective mechanism to deter the filing of low-quality patent applications. The study analyzes the effect on patent quality of the Patent Law Amendment Act of 1982, which resulted in a substantial increase in patenting fees at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Results from a series of difference...
Article
Examining past claims of crisis and their consequences, Teitelbaum disputes arguments that the United States needs more scientists and engineers.

Citations

... We are currently living in a period of rapid transition, in which technological revolutions is accelerating development and reshaping the lifestyles of the people. Technological innovation has brought about changes that are as significant as earlier historical milestones (Ryazanova and Jaskiene, 2022;Kaplinsky and Kraemer-Mbula, 2022;Davies et al., 2022). Almost every industry has embraced modern technology. ...
... Despite these attempts, the actual empirical effectiveness of the proposed metrics remains uncertain. In a recent study, Higham et al. (2020) show how commonly used patent quality measures are generally not in agreement about what makes a "high-quality" patent. They tend to capture different aspects of technological discontinuities. ...
... Gaétan de Rassenfosse and Orion Penner provided valuable programming advice. An earlier version of this manuscript [31] was released as a working paper. ...
... On the other hand, SI is usually unforeseeable while TI has a certain predictability, the reason is that SI aims at understanding and exploring objective laws, but the discovery of such objective laws itself has its unpredictability. The specific development path of scientific discoveries, the timing, and location of breakthrough discoveries, etc., are generally difficult to foresee (Perrons et al., 2021). While TI is a new method or new means adopted to solve practical problems, for its clear purpose, adequate scientific knowledge base, and the corresponding human, material, and financial arrangements, it has certain predictability. ...
... patent value (Dixon and Greenhalgh, 2002;Reitzig, 2004; Zeebroeck and van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, 2011). Though technology evaluation using patent value has largely gained acceptance, researchers also acknowledge variations in applicability and validity of patent value metrics according to sector (Higham et al., 2021;Reitzig, 2004;van Zeebroeck and van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, 2011). Put more bluntly, not all metrics are equally accurate and not all metrics agree with each other. ...
... Jaffe and Lerner (1999) hold the view that high grant rates have caused concerns about the patent quality. USPTO is criticized for granting too many low-quality patents (Lemley and Shapiro, 2005;Lei and Wright, 2017;de Rassenfosse et al., 2021). However, this paper suggests that a single grant rate cannot necessarily indicate patent quality. ...
... For our science-based outcome variables, we identify publications by searching for FAINs in the Web of Science database (Goldstein & Narayanamurti, 2018;De Rassenfosse et al., 2019;Wang et al., 2018). To complement this, we also search for the FAINs in Google Scholar. ...
... The citation index of a patent is an important measure that allows us to infer how important a patent is in a particular technical field [9]. During the prosecution of a patent application, an examiner will look for prior art related to the novelty, obviousness or inventive step associated with an invention. ...
... At a similar level of generalisation, the definition or meaning of productivity is equally obvious. Productivity is a measure, or set of measures, of how effectively scarce resources are combined by an economic entity, such as firms, non-profit and public producers, to achieve desired outcomes (Jaffe et al., 2016). Physical measures of productivity, for instance how many megawatts of clean energy might be produced by different combinations of labour, capital and land, may be used for specific economic sectors, in a particular place at a specific point in time. ...
... Indeed, the larger the stock of internal knowledge, the lower the average cost of its initial generation and subsequent exploitation. Larger firms benefit from the cumulative character of knowledge which allows them to increase their stocks of knowledge at decreasing marginal costs, and simultaneously, to take advantage of the increasing returns from using knowledge in the technology production function (Chappell & Jaffe, 2018). Therefore, we hypothesize that the current bias toward the knowledge-intensive direction of technological change will be stronger for larger sized firms, with important consequences at the aggregate level for the knowledge-intensive direction of technological change which is stronger in economic systems that are characterized by the predominance of large firms. ...