ADRIENNE J. COHEN's research while affiliated with Colorado State University and other places

Publications (4)

Article
In Conakry, the capital city of the Republic of Guinea, dance ceremonies called sabars , derived from a Senegalese genre of the same name, have become extremely popular for wedding celebrations. Sabar's rise in Guinea coincided with the liberalization of the country's economy and the opening of national borders in the wake of state socialism (1958–...
Article
en In the Republic of Guinea, where transnational migration has become a critical path to prestige among young urbanites, migrant success abroad is intimately connected to the cultivation of kin ties at home. For performing artists, who were the darlings of Guinea's Socialist Revolution (1958‐84), the experience of migration is uniquely linked to t...
Article
Dance in the Republic of Guinea is an object of cultural transmission that magnifies the inherent contingency of social reproduction and the plasticity of the heirloom. Long connected to the vicissitudes of Guinean politics, dance was violently appropriated by the postindependence socialist state (1958–84) as a tool of nation building. In postsocia...

Citations

... De Pina-Cabral (2018) writes of how austerity has left a generation that came of age in the 2000s unable to reconcile its familial obligations with the demands of living in a consumer society. Cohen (2018) shows how Guinean transnational migrants use magic and religion to set limits to kinshipand kinship obligation. Meher et al. (2018), in a study of the 'transcendental ethics of care', show how lower-caste care workers in India use the concept of seva to re-frame their engagement with the most intimate aspects of their charges' bodily functions. ...