A Miranda Fredriks's research while affiliated with University Medical Center Utrecht and other places

Publications (13)

Article
A number of studies have shown that victimization from bullying behavior is associated with substantial adverse effects on physical and psychological health, but it is unclear which comes first, the victimization or the health-related symptoms. In our present study, we investigated whether victimization precedes psychosomatic and psychosocial sympt...
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To obtain age references for sitting height (SH), leg length (LL), and SH/H ratio in the Netherlands; to evaluate how SH standard deviation score (SDS), LL SDS, SH/H SDS, and SH/LL SDS are related to height SDS; and to study the usefulness of height corrected SH/H cut-off lines to detect Marfan syndrome and hypochondroplasia. Cross-sectional data o...
Article
Aim: Prevalences of overweight in The Netherlands, defined by international cut-off points, are presented in 14 500 children of Dutch origin, 2904 of Turkish and 2855 of Moroccan origin, aged 0-21 y. Results: The mean prevalence for Turkish boys and girls was 23.4% and 30.2%, for Moroccans 15.8% and 24.5%, for Dutch youths in large cities 12.6%...
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Unlabelled: The aim of this study was to present age references for waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and waist/hip ratio (WHR) in Dutch children. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 14,500 children of Dutch origin in the age range 0-21 years. National references were constructed with the LMS method. This method summarises the...
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To provide growth and sexual maturation reference data for Moroccan children living in The Netherlands and to compare them with the reference data of children of Dutch origin. Cross-sectional growth and demographic data were collected from 2880 children of Moroccan origin and 14,500 children of Dutch origin living in The Netherlands in the age rang...
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Full-text available
Unlabelled: The aim of this study was to provide growth and sexual maturation reference data for Turkish children living in The Netherlands. We also compared these references with the reference data of children of Dutch origin and with Turkish reference data collected in Turkey and elsewhere in Europe. Cross-sectional growth and demographic data w...
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We investigated pubertal development of 4019 boys and 3562 girls >8 y of age participating in a cross-sectional survey in The Netherlands and compared the results with those of two previous surveys. Reference curves for all pubertal stages were constructed. The 50th percentile of Tanner breast stage 2 was 10.7 y, and 50% of the boys had reached a t...
Article
To determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Dutch children in 1980 and 1997 according to international criteria, and to design new reference diagrams for overweight and obesity in children. Descriptive. The prevalence of overweight and obesity, based on height and weight data from the Fourth Dutch Growth Study (1997), was determined ac...
Article
Objective. To compare the body mass index (BMI) of Dutch children in 1980 and 1997, and to apply international criteria for overweight and obesity to the Dutch BMI reference diagrams. Design. Comparison of two consecutive cross-sectional studies. Method. Cross-sectional data on height, weight and demographics of 14,500 boys and girls of Dutch origi...
Article
Objective. To compare stature, weight and pubertal development of Dutch children, derived from 4 consecutive nationwide cross-sectional growth studies over the past 42 years, in order to assess the size and rate of the secular growth change. Design. Comparison of four sets of cross-sectional data. Method. Data on height, weight, head circumference,...
Article
Full-text available
To compare the distribution of body mass index (BMI) in a national representative study in The Netherlands in 1996-7 with that from a study in 1980. Cross sectional data on height, weight, and demographics of 14 500 boys and girls of Dutch origin, aged 0-21 years, were collected from 1996 to 1997. BMI references were derived using the LMS method. T...
Article
Since 1858, an increase of mean stature has been observed in the Netherlands, reflecting the improving nutritional, hygienic, and health status of the population. In this study, stature, weight, and pubertal development of Dutch youth, derived from four consecutive nationwide cross-sectional growth studies during the past 42 y, are compared to asse...

Citations

... At 10 years, the parents reported height as part of an extensive questionnaire. Recent growth curves were used as reference values for body length/height measurements and body mass index[21,22]. These measurements were collected in 1996–1997 during a nationwide growth study on individuals of Dutch origin aged 0 to 21 years. ...
... Height, weight and body mass index (BMI) SDS were calculated with Growth Analyser 4.0 (available at www.growthanalyser.org accessed on 4 February 2022), and were adjusted for gender and age according to Dutch reference values [21,22]. Small for gestational age (SGA) was defined as a birth weight below −2 standard deviations (SDS) [23]. ...
... Overweight is defined as a BMI at or above the 85th percentile and below the 95th percentile for children and teens of the same age and gender. Obesity is defined as a BMI at or above the 95th percentile for children and teens of the same age and gender [4,5]. Children with obesity have an increased risk for insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidaemia, which predisposes them to cardiovascular morbidity in adulthood. ...
... The transition from primary to secondary school is often accompanied by many changes, such as different classrooms and a bigger school building, more and different peers, more homework, and a variety of teachers. During the same time, adolescents may also experience several developmental changes, such as pubertal development (e.g., Mul et al., 2001), increased autonomy from parents (Zimmer-Gembeck & Collins, 2006), and a greater orientation toward peers (Fuligni & Eccles, 1993). These changes might elicit changes in adolescent adjustment. ...
... To visualize the fit of the BMI percentiles for the groups of children with parents of non-Swiss origin, we plotted their raw data and group-specific P10, P50 and P90 over the new P10, P50 and P90 for Switzerland [3], and added available percentiles of the respective European countries or regions (i.e. Italy [9], Spain [10], Portugal [11], Albania [12], Macedonia [13], Serbia [14], Turkey [15][16][17][18][19], Germany [20], and Austria [21]). ...
... [12] However, taller height in a Dutch cohort remains unexplained as the majority had BMI <50 th percentile. Infants of Iceland, [13] Denmark, [14] Netherlands [15] were longer as compared to MGRS means and constituted the outliers at 12 months of age. Data from the German cohort collected until 5 years of age showed that the mean of German boys and girls lay at 60 th and 62 nd centiles, respectively. ...
... The degree of physical activity evaluated according to the validated AQAP questionnaire [7]. We have asked parents about the duration of sleep of their children and a number of hours of sleep <10 h/d was considered insufficient [8]. ...
... The parents' heights were measured to the nearest 1 mm and the heights of other relatives were obtained from the parents. All the data was standardized according to recent normative values (12)(13)(14). ...
... The growing number of children with overweight and obesity is a major health concern in industrialized countries [1][2][3]. In addition, in the Netherlands families with low socio-economic status (SES) and families of Turkish and Moroccan descent have a particularly high prevalence of children with overweight [4][5][6][7][8]. According to the Dutch Central Agency for Statistics, 16.4% of children 9-18 years of age were classified as overweight in 2020, a nearly three-fold increase in prevalence from 1980 in addition, 2.4% of children were considered obese [9]. ...