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Publications (12)

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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Allelic deletions, which are suggestive for the presence of tumor suppressor genes, represent a common event in endometrial cancer (EC). Previous loss-of-heterozygosity studies for human chromosome 10q identified a candidate deletion interval at 10q25-q26, which we further narrowed to a 160-kb region at 10q26, bounded by markers D10S1236 and WIAF3299. Using a positional candidate approach, we identified three alternative transcripts of a novel human gene, CASC2 (cancer susceptibility candidate 2; formely C10orf5). One of such transcripts, CASC2a, encodes a short protein of 102 amino acids with no similarity to any other known gene product. Three (7%) CASC2a mutations were identified in tumor DNA from 44 EC patients. While c.-156G>T and c.22C>T (p.Pro8Ser) are sequence variants with unknown functional significance, c.84delA is a mutation with a truncation effect on the predicted protein (p. Asn28fsX50). Expression studies by real-time RT-PCR on several normal and tumor cells revealed that CASC2a mRNA is downregulated in cancer, suggesting that it may act as a potential tumor suppressor gene. The very low mutation rate seems to also indicate that inactivation of CASC2a might probably be due to mechanisms different from genetic alterations.
    Full-text Article · Apr 2004 · Human Mutation
  • Pasquale Ena · Maria Paola Lorrai · Adriana Pintus · [...] · Luca A Dessy
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: We describe the case of a 59-year-old uncircumcised man, with a history of meatal stenosis and balanitis xerotica obliterans (lichen sclerosus et atrophicus) and human C virus hepatitis, who developed an infiltrating squamous cell carcinoma of the penis. The relationship among these conditions is discussed.
    Article · Mar 2004 · Andrologia
  • Article · Jan 2004 · Annals of Oncology
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    R Muresu · M C Sini · A Cossu · [...] · G Palmieri
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Defective DNA mismatch repair and nonfunctional mechanisms controlling the proper progression of the cell cycle have been proposed as being responsible for the genomic instability and accumulation of karyotypic alterations in endometrial cancer (EC). To assess whether numerical chromosomal anomalies (aneuploidy) and microsatellite instability (MSI) might be representative of distinctive tumour behaviour, paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 86 patients with sporadic EC were evaluated by both fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and microsatellite analysis, using free nuclei and genomic DNAs (respectively). Approximately one-third of the tumours analysed (24/74; 32%) exhibited MSI, whereas 38/86 (44%) of the EC samples displayed aneuploidy. The majority of the unstable cases (15/24; 63%) were from advanced-stage patients. Conversely, 23 (61%) out of the 38 tumours with aneuploidy were from early-stage patients. No apparent correlation was found between MSI and aneuploidy, whereas the immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis revealed that inactivation of the MLH1 mismatch repair gene may be involved in the majority of the MSI+ sporadic ECs. No genetic or cytogenetic alteration analysed here seems to add any significant predictive value to the stage of disease.
    Full-text Article · Oct 2002 · European Journal of Cancer
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Defective DNA mismatch repair and nonfunctional mechanisms controlling the proper progression of the cell cycle have been proposed as being responsible for the genomic instability and accumulation of karyotypic alterations in endometrial cancer (EC). To assess whether numerical chromosomal anomalies (aneuploidy) and microsatellite instability (MSI) might be representative of distinctive tumour behaviour, paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 86 patients with sporadic EC were evaluated by both fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and microsatellite analysis, using free nuclei and genomic DNAs (respectively). Approximately one-third of the tumours analysed (24/74; 32%) exhibited MSI, whereas 38/86 (44%) of the EC samples displayed aneuploidy. The majority of the unstable cases (15/24; 63%) were from advanced-stage patients. Conversely, 23 (61%) out of the 38 tumours with aneuploidy were from early-stage patients. No apparent correlation was found between MSI and aneuploidy, whereas the immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis revealed that inactivation of the MLH1 mismatch repair gene may be involved in the majority of the MSI+ sporadic ECs. No genetic or cytogenetic alteration analysed here seems to add any significant predictive value to the stage of disease.
    Full-text Article · Sep 2002 · European Journal of Cancer
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Microsatellite instability (MSI) is due mostly to a defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR). Inactivation of the two principal MMR genes, hMLH1 and hMSH2, and the PTEN tumor suppressor gene seems to be involved in endometrial tumorigenesis. In this study, Sardinian patients with endometrial carcinoma (EC) were analyzed to assess the prevalence of both the mutator phenotype (as defined by the presence of MSI and abnormal MMR gene expression at the somatic level) and the hMLH1, hMSH2, and PTEN germline mutations among patients with MSI positive EC. Paraffin embedded tissue samples from 116 consecutive patients with EC were screened for MSI by polymerase chain reaction-based microsatellite analysis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) with anti-hMLH1 and anti-hMSH2 antibodies was performed on MSI positive tumor tissue sections. Germline DNA was used for mutational screening by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography analysis and automated sequencing. Thirty-nine patients with EC (34%) exhibited MSI; among them, 25 tumor samples (64%) showed negative immunostaining for hMLH1/hMSH2 proteins (referred to as IHC negative). No disease-causing mutation within the coding sequences of the hMLH1/hMSH2 and PTEN genes was found in patients with EC who had the mutator phenotype (MSI positive and IHC negative), except for a newly described hMLH1 missense mutation, Ile655Val, that was observed in 1 of 27 patients (4%). Although MSI was more common among patients with advanced-stage EC and increased as the tumor grade increased, no significant correlation with disease free survival or overall survival was observed among the two groups (MSI positive or MSI negative) of patients with EC. In patients with MSI positive EC, epigenetic inactivations rather than genetic mutations of the MMR genes seem to be involved in endometrial tumorigenesis. No prognostic value was demonstrated for MSI in patients with EC.
    Full-text Article · Jun 2002 · Cancer
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    Full-text Article · Apr 2001 · European Journal of Cancer
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background: Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at chromosome 10q25-q26 has been reported previously in endometrial carcinoma (EC), suggesting the presence of tumor suppressor gene(s). Nevertheless, frequency of genome-wide microsatellite instability (MSI) has been demonstrated higher in EC than in other common malignancy, mostly due to defective DNA mismatch repair. The authors further evaluated the role of the chromosome 10q25-q26 in endometrial tumorigenesis as well as the clinical significance of any observed genetic alteration in sporadic EC. Methods: Paired normal and tumor samples from 94 Sardinian patients with sporadic EC at various stages of disease were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based microsatellite analysis. Genomic DNA was isolated from paraffin embedded tissues and amplified by PCR using microsatellite markers spanning approximately 14 cM at 10q25-q26. Microsatellite instability was studied at four loci mapping to different chromosomal locations. Results: Thirty-two (34%) EC patients were found negative for genetic alterations within the 10q25-q26 region. Among the remaining 62 (66%) EC cases, the authors identified 1) a minimum consensus region of LOH of approximately 1 cM, between D10S610 and D10S542 markers; and 2) a subset of tumors with prevalence of instability at 10q25-q26 (10qMI+), as expression of the presence of a MSI+ phenotype. Conclusions: The authors' data establish the existence of significant correlations between disease stages and 10qMI+ (with or without MSI+). However, longer follow-up and additional studies are required to define the clinical significance of these findings as prognostic factors. Moreover, the minimum region of LOH at 10q25-q26 will be further analyzed for identifying the putative tumor suppressor gene involved in EC pathogenesis.
    Full-text Article · Nov 2000 · Cancer
  • V Marras · A Cossu · G A Onida · [...] · F Tanda
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Blue nevus is a pigmented lesion of dermal melanocytes; the extracutaneous locations are uncommon. We report a case of a blue nevus of the uterine cervix in a 53 years old woman, with histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations.
    Article · Sep 2000 · Pathologica
  • P Baldinu · A Cossu · A Manca · [...] · G Palmieri
    Article · Jan 2000 · Annals of Oncology
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Retrospective analysis of chromosomal changes in endometrial carcinoma was performed by fluorescence in situ hybridization on free nuclei isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. We examined 23 archival samples for numerical aberrations of chromosomes 1 and 10 with the use of specific DNA probes for the pericentromeric and centromeric regions of these two chromosomes. Numerical aberrations of chromosomes 1 and 10 were detected in 39% of the case analyzed, and the frequency of trisomy 10 tended to increase as the histological grade worsened. Our findings confirm the association of cytogenetic anomalies involving chromosomes 1 and 10 with endometrial carcinoma, as reported by other studies, and suggest that changes in centromere 10 copy number may correlate with the degree of tumor differentiation.
    Article · Dec 1998 · Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Retrospective analysis of chromosomal changes in endometrial carcinoma was performed by fluorescence in situ hybridization on free nuclei isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. We examined 23 archival samples for numerical aberrations of chromosomes 1 and 10 with the use of specific DNA probes for the pericentromeric and centromeric regions of these two chromosomes. Numerical aberrations of chromosomes 1 and 10 were detected in 39% of the case analyzed, and the frequency of trisomy 10 tended to increase as the histological grade worsened. Our findings confirm the association of cytogenetic anomalies involving chromosomes 1 and 10 with endometrial carcinoma, as reported by other studies, and suggest that changes in centromere 10 copy number may correlate with the degree of tumor differentiation.
    Article · Nov 1998 · Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics