Donald Evans

Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN, United States

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Publications (3)55.91 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans and its relatives are unique among animals in having operons. Operons are regulated multigene transcription units, in which polycistronic pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA coding for multiple peptides) is processed to monocistronic mRNAs. This occurs by 3' end formation and trans-splicing using the specialized SL2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle for downstream mRNAs. Previously, the correlation between downstream location in an operon and SL2 trans-splicing has been strong, but anecdotal. Although only 28 operons have been reported, the complete sequence of the C. elegans genome reveals numerous gene clusters. To determine how many of these clusters represent operons, we probed full-genome microarrays for SL2-containing mRNAs. We found significant enrichment for about 1,200 genes, including most of a group of several hundred genes represented by complementary DNAs that contain SL2 sequence. Analysis of their genomic arrangements indicates that >90% are downstream genes, falling in 790 distinct operons. Our evidence indicates that the genome contains at least 1,000 operons, 2 8 genes long, that contain about 15% of all C. elegans genes. Numerous examples of co-transcription of genes encoding functionally related proteins are evident. Inspection of the operon list should reveal previously unknown functional relationships.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2002 · Nature
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    Donald Evans · Thomas Blumenthal
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    ABSTRACT: Genes in Caenorhabditis elegans operons are transcribed as polycistronic pre-mRNAs in which downstream gene products aretrans spliced to a specialized spliced leader, SL2. SL2 is donated by a 110-nucleotide RNA, SL2 RNA, present in the cell as an Sm-bound snRNP. SL2 RNA can be conceptually folded into a phylogenetically conserved three-stem-loop secondary structure. Here we report an in vivo mutational analysis of the SL2 RNA. Some sequences can be changed without consequence, while other changes result in a substantial loss of trans splicing. Interestingly, the spliced leader itself can be dramatically altered, such that the first stem-loop cannot form, with only a relatively small loss intrans-splicing efficiency. However, the primary sequence of stem II is crucial for SL2 trans splicing. Similarly, the conserved primary sequence of the third stem-loop plays a key role intrans splicing. While mutations in stem-loop III allow snRNP formation, a single nucleotide substitution in the loop preventstrans splicing. In contrast, the analogous region of SL1 RNA is not highly conserved, and its mutation does not abrogate function. Thus, stem-loop III appears to confer a specific function to SL2 RNA. Finally, an upstream sequence, previously predicted to be a proximal sequence element, is shown to be required for SL2 RNA expression.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2000 · Molecular and Cellular Biology
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    ABSTRACT: The genomes of most eukaryotes are composed of genes arranged on the chromosomes without regard to function, with each gene transcribed from a promoter at its 5′ end. However, the genome of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains numerous polycistronic clusters similar to bacterial operons in which the genes are transcribed sequentially from a single promoter at the 5′ end of the cluster. The resulting polycistronic pre-mRNAs are processed into monocistronic mRNAs by conventional 3′ end formation, cleavage, and polyadenylation, accompanied by trans-splicing with a specialized spliced leader (SL), SL2. To determine whether this mode of gene organization and expression, apparently unique among the animals, occurs in other species, we have investigated genes in a distantly related free-living rhabditid nematode in the genus Dolichorhabditis (strain CEW1). We have identified both SL1 and SL2 RNAs in this species. In addition, we have sequenced a Dolichorhabditis genomic region containing a gene cluster with all of the characteristics of the C. elegans operons. We show that the downstream gene is trans-spliced to SL2. We also present evidence that suggests that these two genes are also clustered in the C. elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae genomes. Thus, it appears that the arrangement of genes in operons pre-dates the divergence of the genus Caenorhabditis from the other genera in the family Rhabditidae, and may be more widespread than is currently appreciated.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 1997 · Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences