Jacqueline Bourdeau

LICEF Research Center, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

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Publications (60)4.62 Total impact

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    Riichiro Mizoguchi · Jacqueline Bourdeau
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    ABSTRACT: This article reflects on the ontology engineering methodology discussed by the paper entitled “Using Ontological Engineering to Overcome AI-ED Problems” published in this journal in 2000. We discuss the achievements obtained in the last 10 years, the impact of our work as well as recent trends and perspectives in ontology engineering for AIED.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015
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    Yusuke Hayashi · Seiji Isotani · Jacqueline Bourdeau · Riichiro Mizoguchi

    Full-text · Dataset · May 2015
  • Z.X. Wu · J. Bourdeau · R. Nkambou
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    ABSTRACT: In today's age of globalization, cultural awareness has become a challenge for designers of tutoring systems to include the cultural dimension in the tutoring strategy and in the learning environment. Nevertheless, cultural awareness is also a domain to be learned by a student, and a competency that can be assessed. Research on cultural intelligence has provided a new perspective and presented a new way to alleviate issues arising from cross-cultural education. To date, no research on cultural intelligence has been empirically computerized with soft-computing technology. This research aims to invent a cultural intelligence computational model and to implement the model in an expert system through the use of artificial intelligence technology. The purpose of this study is to provide intercultural training for individuals to solve the intercultural adaptation problems they may be faced with in a variety of authentic crosscultural situations.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2013
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    Yusuke HAYASHI · Jacqueline BOURDEAU · Riichiro MIZOGUCHI
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    ABSTRACT: On the basis of the achievements of OMNIBUS project, this paper presents the functionality of theory-aware authoring system and discusses how to accumulate learn- ing/instructional design knowledge as the foundations for theory-awareness. The concept of "WAY" proposed by this study would be helpful for both utilizing and abstracting learning/ instructional design knowledge. Structuralization of WAY in an IS-A hierarchy is the key point toward accumulation of learning/instructional design knowledge.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2012
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    Yusuke Hayashi · Jacqueline Bourdeau · Riichiro Mizoguchi
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    ABSTRACT: One of the problems to build theory-based authoring systems is the difficulty in building and sustainable maintenance of the knowledge base. This paper discusses an ontological structure for the accumulation of learn-ing/instructional design knowledge. Based on the past results of the OMNIBUS project, we present layering of the scenario model to introduce fundamental conceptualization of WAY knowledge followed by a discussion on how to ab-stract WAY knowledge from theoretical literature and/or scenarios found in best practices using an example of structuralization of theoretical knowledge.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2012
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    Yusuke Hayashi · Seiji Isotani · Jacqueline Bourdeau · Riichiro Mizoguchi
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    ABSTRACT: This paper proposes an ontological model that is a flexible framework to create learning scenarios blending didactic and collaborative learning. This model enables us to describe the design rationale of such learning scenarios and to organize theoretical knowledge for designing such scenarios in the same manner.
    Full-text · Chapter · Jun 2011
  • Danièle Allard · Jacqueline Bourdeau · Riichiro Mizoguchi

    No preview · Article · May 2011
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    Yusuke Hayashi · Seiji Isotani · Jacqueline Bourdeau · Riichiro Mizoguchi

    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jan 2011
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    ABSTRACT: Computer-supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) is an interdisciplinary research field that gathers researchers from different backgrounds around one common goal: to facilitate the design, deployment, and analysis of collaborative learning activities whose participants (primarily, students and instructors) are supported by information and communication technologies. CSCL researchers at tempt to understand how learning emerges in group settings, and how to create effective scenarios that enable learning through interaction, exploration, negotiation, discussion, and collaborative knowledge construction. Thus, CSCL has contributed to the development of the Learning Sciences by bringing into focus the need to understand the nature, theory, and practice of how we learn in collaborative settings supported by advanced technologies.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2011 · IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies
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    Jacqueline Bourdeau · Monique Grandbastien · Nancy Loria
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    ABSTRACT: RÉSUMÉ : Cette communication propose une synthèse et une réflexion sur le sujet de la modélisation du tutorat dans les systèmes tutoriels intelligents. Elle en précise l'origine et les défis, ainsi que les travaux réalisés et les tendances observées. On y aborde les questions de la caractérisation du tutorat, de sa définition, des sources de connaissances utilisées, et des techniques de modélisation. Une description des fonctions et des variables est proposée, ainsi que les hypothèses formulées et retenues pour implémentation et évaluation dans la conception des systèmes tutoriels intelligents. La question de l'adaptation, fondamentale pour les systèmes tutoriels intelligents, y est privilégiée. MOTS CLÉS : Systèmes tutoriels intelligents, modélisation des connaissances, tutorat ABSTRACT : This communication proposes a synthesis on the topic of modeling tutoring knowledge in intelligent tutoring systems. Its origins and challenges are exposed, as well as research results and tendencies. Issues of characterizing tutoring, defining it, identifying sources of knowledge, and modeling techniques are presented and discussed. A description of tutoring functions and variables is proposed, as well as hypotheses that have been formulated for design, implementation and evaluation of intelligent tutoring systems. The issue of adaptation, essential for intelligent tutoring systems, is privileged.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2011
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    Yusuke Hayashi · Seiji Isotani · Jacqueline Bourdeau · Riichiro Mizoguchi
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    ABSTRACT: Didactic learning that follows the "traditional" model of a teacher-student relationship is often considered completely different from collaborative learning. As a result, few studies have explored the potential to effectively connect these two forms of learning. Nevertheless, in practice, a well-though-tout linkage between these different approaches is essential to leverage and facilitate the learning process. Thus, in this paper, we propose an ontological model that captures the similarity between the two forms of learning, with a focus on participants' interactions. One of the benefits of this model is the creation of a flexible framework to describe learning independently of the approach used to learn. Second, it also enables us to describe the design rationale of learning scenarios and to organize theoretical knowledge for designing such scenarios in the same manner. To validate this model, we show its advantages with the examination in modeling theories for didactic and collaborative learning, and describe the development of an authoring tool for learning design that uses the model to facilitate the design of theory-based blended learning scenarios.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2011 · Lecture Notes in Computer Science
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    Roger Nkambou · Jacqueline Bourdeau · Valéry Psyché
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    ABSTRACT: This chapter addresses the challenge of building or authoring an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS), along with the problems that have arisen and been dealt with, and the solutions that have been tested. We begin by clarifying what building an ITS entails, and then position today’s systems in the overall historical context of ITS research. The chapter concludes with a series of open questions and an introduction to the other chapters in this part of the book.
    Full-text · Chapter · Sep 2010
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    Jacqueline Bourdeau · Monique Grandbastien
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    ABSTRACT: This chapter introduces Part II on modeling tutoring knowledge in ITS research. Starting with its origin and with a characterization of tutoring, it proposes a general definition of tutoring, and a description of tutoring functions, variables, and interactions. The Interaction Hypothesis is presented and discussed, followed by the development of the tutorial component of ITSs, and their evaluation. New challenges are described, such as integrating the emotional states of the learner. Perspectives of opening the Tutoring Model and of equipping it with social intelligence are also presented.
    Full-text · Chapter · Sep 2010
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    Riichiro Mizoguchi · Yusuke Hayashi · Jacqueline Bourdeau
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    ABSTRACT: This chapter discusses an ontological approach to tutoring actions design as a special case of target-world modeling. Although a lot of research on the learner model has been done to improve the adaptivity of intelligent tutoring systems (ITSs), the modeling of tutoring actions has not been sufficiently investigated. The authors have been performing ontological modeling of learning/instructional theories to remedy this situation. Intelligent tutoring systems must have a good number of primitive actions to generate intelligent actions. Paying close attention to the importance of modeling tutoring actions, we have developed an ontology of learning/instructional theories, named OMNIBUS, in the ITS domain. Drawing on our long experience in ontological engineering research, this chapter discusses the modeling of tutoring actions as well as target-world modeling per se, using an example of learning/instructional actions from the OMNIBUS/SMARTIES project.
    Full-text · Chapter · Sep 2010
  • Yusuke Hayashi · Jacqueline Bourdeau · Riichiro Mizoguchi
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    ABSTRACT: Structuring learning/instructional theories suffer from the issue of 'paradigms', which makes them even more challenging. This paper discusses the conceptualisation of the theories and proposes a mechanism to provide perspectives for understanding and utilising them. Two types of conceptualisation proposed in this paper reveal their characteristics from a variety of viewpoints.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010
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    D. Allard · J. Bourdeau · R. Mizoguchi
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    ABSTRACT: The goal of this research, a work in progress, is to address areas in second/foreign language acquisition prone to cross-linguistic influence, and to examine related cultural factors. More specifically, the authors aim to identify such areas, map available knowledge in this respect using ontological engineering methodology, and devise appropriate teaching strategies and learning scenarios to help overcome cross-linguistic influence with the help of computer-assisted language learning systems. The authors have been working mainly with Japanese-speaking students of English and first-year university English-speaking students of French. In this chapter, the authors describe culture in relation to foreign language learning, cross-linguistic influence, their cultural framework as well as ontological engineering methodology. They demonstrate their work with examples of the use of modals by Japanese students/speakers of English. They further provide an illustration of ontological modeling in addition to a basic simulation of how a CALL system based on an ontology could potentially work.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2010
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    Roger Nkambou · Jacqueline Bourdeau · Riichiro Mizoguchi
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    ABSTRACT: This introductory chapter opens the doors to the field of Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) and ITS research. A historical perspective provides insight into the genesis of the field, which is a prerequisite for understanding the recent advances presented in the book. Challenges specific to the field are introduced, and the community and its dynamics are described. The chapter ends with a presentation of the book’s contents and organization.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2010
  • Roger Nkambou · Riichiro Mizoguchi · Jacqueline Bourdeau
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    ABSTRACT: The idea for this book on Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) was sparked by the success of the ITS’08 international conference. The number of presentations and their quality bore witness to the vitality and maturity of the field, and the enthusiasm of the participants held out a promise of sustainability and innovative research. Long life to ITS research! The book is divided into five parts. The introductory chapters to these parts, which summarize foundations, developments, strengths and weaknesses in each of the areas covered, are addressed to all readers. For those who want more in-depth knowledge, we give the floor to researchers who present their work, their results, and their view of what the future holds. It is our hope that all readers will find the book informative and thought-provoking. (http://www.springer.com/engineering/computational+intelligence+and+complexity/book/978-3-642-14362-5)
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010
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    ABSTRACT: Using as data videotapes of archaeologists working to see and map structure in the dirt they are excavating, meaning-making in the home of a man with severe aphasia, and sequences of actual talk-in-interaction, this talk will investigate action, cognition, ...
    No preview · Conference Paper · Jan 2009
  • Source
    Yusuke Hayashi · Jacqueline Bourdeau
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the achievements of an innovative eight-year research program first introduced in Mizoguchi and Bourdeau (2000), which was aimed at building a theory-aware authoring system by using ontological engineering. To date, we have proposed OMNIBUS, an ontology that comprehensively covers different learning/instructional theories and paradigms, and SMARTIES, a theory-aware and standards-compliant authoring system to create learning/instructional scenarios based on OMNIBUS. This approach was intended to bridge the gap between theory and practice in scientific and technological development, including learning/instruction support. The goals of this study included the following: that computers would (a) understand a variety of learning/instructional theories based on their organization, (b) utilize such understanding to help authors build learning/instructional scenarios, and (c) make such theoretically sound scenarios interoperable within the framework of technology standards. This paper suggests an ontological engineering solution to achieve these three goals and describes the implementation and feasibility demonstrations of the basic functions of SMARTIES, a solution that supports the design of learning/instructional scenarios based on multiple theories. Although the evaluation is far from complete in terms of practical use, we believe that the results of this study speak to high-level technical challenges of ITS authoring systems and the other areas of AIED, and therefore constitute a substantial contribution.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2009 · International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education

Publication Stats

651 Citations
4.62 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005-2012
    • LICEF Research Center
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2004-2010
    • Université du Québec à Montréal
      • Department of Computer Science
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2006
    • Télé-université
      Québec, Quebec, Canada
  • 2002
    • Osaka University
      Suika, Ōsaka, Japan