Sandra M Godden

Saint Mary's University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States

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Publications (107)180.18 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Little information is available about current practices around calving in dairy cattle. The aim of this study was to describe calving management practices in the Canadian dairy industry related to housing, calving protocols, monitoring of parturition, and calving assistance. Information was gathered by in-person interviews from 236 dairy farms from 3 Canadian provinces (Alberta, Ontario, and Québec) with freestalls and an automatic milking system (n = 24), freestalls with a parlor (n = 112), and tiestalls (n = 100). The most commonly used types of calving facilities were group calving pens (35%) followed by individual calving pens (30%). Tiestalls were used by 26% of all surveyed producers as their main type of calving area (49% of the tiestall, 7% of the freestall with parlor, and 13% of the automatic milking system farms). Written protocols related to calving were found on only 7% of the farms visited, and only 50% of those protocols were developed with a veterinarian. However, 90% of producers kept written records of calving difficulty. Monitoring of cows around calving occurred 5 times more often during the daytime (between morning and evening milking) compared with nighttime. Cameras were used to monitor cows around and during calvings on 18% of farms. Sixteen percent of producers vaginally palpated all animals during calving. Twenty-seven percent of producers interviewed assisted all calvings on their farms by pulling the calf, and 37% assisted all heifers at calving. According to the producers' reported perception, 93% of them had "a minor problem" or "no problem" with calving difficulties on their farms. This study provides basic data on current calving practices and identifies areas for improvement and potential targets for knowledge transfer efforts or research to clarify best management practices.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Dairy Science

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015
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    A.P. Johnson · S.M. Godden · E. Royster · S. Zuidhof · B. Miller · J. Sorg
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    ABSTRACT: The study objective was to compare the efficacy of 2 commercial dry cow mastitis formulations containing cloxacillin benzathine or ceftiofur hydrochloride. Quarter-level outcomes included prevalence of intramammary infection (IMI) postcalving, risk for cure of preexisting infections, risk for acquiring a new IMI during the dry period, and risk for clinical mastitis between dry off and 100 d in milk (DIM). Cow-level outcomes included the risk for clinical mastitis and the risk for removal from the herd between dry off and 100 DIM, as well as Dairy Herd Improvement Association (DHIA) test-day milk component and production measures between calving and 100 DIM. A total of 799 cows from 4 Wisconsin dairy herds were enrolled at dry off and randomized to 1 of the 2 commercial dry cow therapy (DCT) treatments: cloxacillin benzathine (DC; n = 401) or ceftiofur hydrochloride (SM; n = 398). Aseptic quarter milk samples were collected for routine bacteriological culture before DCT at dry off and again at 0 to 10 DIM. Data describing clinical mastitis cases and DHIA test-day results were retrieved from on-farm electronic records. The overall crude quarter-level prevalence of IMI at dry off was 34.7% and was not different between treatment groups. Ninety-six percent of infections at dry off were of gram-positive organisms, with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and Aerococcus spp. isolated most frequently. Mixed logistic regression analysis showed no difference between treatments as to the risk for presence of IMI at 0 to 10 DIM (DC = 22.4%, SM = 19.9%) or on the risk for acquiring a new IMI between dry off and 0 to 10 DIM (DC = 16.6%, SM = 14.1%). Noninferiority analysis and mixed logistic regression analysis both showed no treatment difference in risk for a cure between dry off and 0 to 10 DIM (DC = 84.8%, SM = 85.7%). Cox proportional hazards regression showed no difference between treatments in quarter-level risk for clinical mastitis (DC = 1.99%, SM = 2.96%), cow-level risk for clinical mastitis (DC = 17.0%, SM = 15.3%), or on risk for removal from the herd (DC = 10.7%, SM = 10.3%) between dry off and 100 DIM. Finally, multivariable linear regression with repeated measures showed no overall no difference between treatments in DHIA test-day somatic cell count linear score (DC = 2.19, SM = 2.22), butterfat test (DC = 3.84%, SM = 3.86%), protein test (DC = 3.02%, SM = 3.02%), or 305-d mature-equivalent milk production (DC = 11,817 kg, SM = 11,932 kg) between calving and 100 DIM. In conclusion, DC was noninferior to SM in effecting a cure, and there was no difference in efficacy between these 2 DCT formulations as related to all other udder health or cow performance measures evaluated between dry off and 100 DIM.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Dairy Science
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    Full-text · Dataset · Aug 2015
  • M.P. Brady · S.M. Godden · D.M. Haines
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    ABSTRACT: High concentrations of coliform bacteria in maternal colostrum (MC) have been associated with reduced IgG absorption in calves. Mannan-oligosaccharide, a gut-active carbohydrate (GAC) derived from yeast cell wall, has been shown to adsorb pathogens expressing type-1-fimbriae, reducing their ability to colonize the gastrointestinal tract. The objective of this study was to investigate if addition of a GAC to colostrum would result in increased IgG absorption in newborn calves. Newborn Holstein heifer and bull calves were enrolled in summer 2012 at a commercial transition cow facility in western Wisconsin. Each day, 7.6-L pools of fresh, first milking MC were created, split into 3.8-L aliquots, and refrigerated until feeding. Eligible newborn calves were removed from the dam 30 to 60 min after birth, weighed, and randomly assigned to be fed either 3.8 L of the MC pool (control) or 3.8 L of the MC pool with 30 g of GAC mixed in immediately before feeding. Duplicate 10-mL samples of colostrum were collected and frozen at -20°C before feeding (and before addition of GAC) for bacterial culture and IgG determination. A 10-mL venous blood sample was collected from calves before feeding colostrum and 24 h after colostrum feeding, for laboratory determination of serum IgG using radial immunodiffusion analysis. Colostrum and calf characteristics, including colostrum IgG concentration (g/L), colostrum bacteria counts (log10, cfu/mL), calf dystocia scores (1 to 4), birth weights (kg), and age at first feeding (min) were not different between the group fed GAC (n = 47) and the control group (n = 48). Mixed linear regression analysis showed that calves fed colostrum supplemented with 30 g of GAC had lower mean (standard error) apparent efficiency of absorption of IgG and lower serum IgG concentrations at 24 h [23.9% (1.0); IgG = 24.0 (1.1) g/L] than did control calves [30.4% (1.0); IgG = 30.8 (1.0) g/L]. Given the negative effect observed in this study, it is not recommended that fresh colostrum be supplemented with 30 g of GAC. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of Dairy Science
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    S.M. Godden · S Wells · M Donahue · J Stabel · J.M. Oakes · S Sreevatsan · J Fetrow
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    ABSTRACT: In summer 2007, a randomized controlled field trial was initiated on 6 large Midwest commercial dairy farms to investigate the effect of feeding heat-treated (HT) colostrum on transmission of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and on future milk production and longevity within the herd. On each farm, colostrum was collected daily from fresh cows, pooled, divided into 2 aliquots, and then 1 aliquot was heat-treated in a commercial batch pasteurizer at 60°C for 60 min. A sample from each batch of colostrum was collected for PCR testing (MAP-positive vs. MAP-negative). Newborn heifer calves were removed from the dam within 30 to 60 min of birth and systematically assigned to be fed 3.8 L of either fresh (FR; n = 434) or heat-treated (HT; n = 490) colostrum within 2 h of birth. After reaching adulthood (>2 yr old), study animals were tested once annually for 3 yr (2010, 2011, 2012) for infection with MAP using serum ELISA and fecal culture. Lactation records describing milk production data and death or culling events were collected during the 3-yr testing period. Multivariable model logistic and linear regression was used to investigate the effect of feeding HT colostrum on risk for testing positive to MAP during the 3-yr testing period (positive/negative; logistic regression) and on first and second lactation milk yield (kg/cow; linear regression), respectively. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to investigate the effect of feeding HT colostrum on risk and time to removal from the herd. Fifteen percent of all study animals were fed PCR-positive colostrum. By the end of the 3-yr testing period, no difference was noted in the proportion of animals testing positive for MAP, with either serum ELISA or fecal culture, when comparing the HT group (10.5%) versus the FR group (8.1%). There was no effect of treatment on first- (HT = 11.797 kg; FR = 11,671 kg) or second-lactation (HT = 11,013 kg; FR = 11,235 kg) milk production. The proportion of cows leaving the herd by study conclusion was not different for animals originally fed HT (68.0%) versus FR (71.7%) colostrum. Although a previous study showed that feeding HT colostrum (60°C for 60 min) produces short-term benefits, including improved passive transfer of IgG and reduced morbidity in the preweaning period, the current study found no benefit of feeding HT colostrum on long-term outcomes including risk for transmission of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis, milk production in the first and second lactation, and longevity within the herd. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of Dairy Science
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE To investigate the association of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) or vaccination with serologic response in calves. ANIMALS 94 Holstein calves. PROCEDURES To assess the association between BRD and antibody titers, 38 calves < 3 months old that were treated for BRD were matched with 38 untreated calves. To investigate the effect of vaccination on antibody titers, 24 calves were randomly assigned to be vaccinated against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus types 1 and 2, bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV1), and parainfluenza virus type 3 at 2 weeks of age (n = 6), 5 weeks of age (6), and both 2 and 5 weeks of age (6) or were assigned to be unvaccinated controls (6). Blood samples were obtained at I, 2, 5, and 12 weeks for determination of serum neutralization antibody titers against the vaccine viruses, bovine coronavirus, and Mannheimia haemolytica. Antibody rates of decay were calculated. RESULTS Calves with initial antibody titers against BRSV < 1:64 that were treated for BRD had a slower rate of anti-BRSV antibody decay than did similar calves that were not treated for BRD. Calves with high initial antibody titers against BRSV and BHV1 had lower odds of BRD than did calves with low initial antibody titers against those 2 pathogens. Vaccination at 2 or 5 weeks of age had no effect on the rate of antibody decay. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Clinical BRD and the serologic response of dairy calves were associated with initial antibody titers against BRSV and BHV1. Serologic or clinical responses to viral exposure may differ in calves with low passive immunity.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · American Journal of Veterinary Research
  • A.A. Kryzer · S.M. Godden · R. Schell
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this randomized clinical trial was to describe the effect on colostrum characteristics and passive transfer of IgG in neonatal calves when using the Perfect Udder colostrum management system (single-aliquot treatment; Dairy Tech Inc., Greeley, CO) compared with a negative control (fresh refrigerated or fresh frozen colostrum) and a positive control (batch heat-treated colostrum). First-milking Jersey colostrum was pooled to achieve 31 unique batches with a minimum of 22.8 L per batch. The batch was then divided into 4 with 3.8 L allocated to each treatment group: (1) heat-treated in Perfect Udder bag at 60°C for 60 min and then stored at −20°C (PU); (2) heat-treated in a batch pasteurizer (Dairy Tech Inc.) at 60°C for 60 min and then stored at −20°C in Perfect Udder bag (DTB; positive control); (3) fresh frozen colostrum stored at −20°C in Perfect Udder bag (FF; negative control); and (4) fresh refrigerated colostrum stored at 4°C in Perfect Udder bag (FR; negative control). Colostrum from all treatments was sampled for analysis of IgG concentration and bacterial culture immediately after batch assembly, after processing, and before feeding. Newborn Jersey calves were randomly assigned to be fed 3.8 L of colostrum from 1 of the 4 treatment groups. A prefeeding, 0-h blood sample was collected, calves were fed by esophageal tube within 2 h of birth, and then a 24-h postfeeding blood sample was collected. Paired serum samples from 0- and 24-h blood samples were analyzed for IgG concentration (mg/mL) using radial immunodiffusion analysis. The overall mean IgG concentration in colostrum was 77.9 g/L and was not affected by treatment. Prefeeding total plate counts (log10 cfu/mL) were significantly different for all 4 treatments and were lower for heat-treated colostrum (PU = 4.23, DTB = 3.63) compared with fresh colostrum (FF = 5.68, FR = 6.53). Total coliform counts (log10 cfu/mL) were also significantly different for all 4 treatments and were lower for heat-treated colostrum (PU = 0.45, DTB = 1.08) compared with fresh colostrum (FF = 3.82, FR = 4.80). Mean 24-h serum IgG concentrations were significantly higher for calves in the PU (41.0 mg/mL) and DTB (40.6 mg/mL) groups compared with FF (35.1 mg/mL) and FR (35.5 mg/mL) groups. Mean apparent efficiency of absorption of IgG was significantly higher for the PU (37%) and DTB (37%) groups compared with the FF (32%) and FR (32%) groups. Calves fed heat-treated colostrum (PU or DTB) experienced significantly improved AEA and serum IgG concentrations.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Dairy Science
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    ABSTRACT: The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effects of supplementing a commercial colostrum replacer (CR) with gut active carbohydrates (GAC) on passive transfer of IgG in commercial dairy calves. A secondary objective was to evaluate the effect of treatment on preweaning health and growth. A total of 240 newborn Holstein dairy calves on a commercial dairy farm were enrolled in this study. Newborn heifer and bull calves were weighed and then randomly assigned to either the treated group [GAC: 30 g of GAC mixed into 1.5 doses (150 g of IgG) of commercial colostrum replacer; n = 119] or the control group [CON: 1.5 doses (150 g of IgG) of CR; n = 121]. The assigned CR treatment was fed within 3.5 h of birth using an esophageal tube feeder. Venous blood samples were collected at 0 and 24 h of age and used to measure serum IgG (mg/mL) and serum total protein (g/dL) concentrations and to estimate the apparent efficiency of absorption of IgG (%). The 129 heifers calves enrolled (CON = 60; GAC = 69) were also followed until weaning to assess the effect of GAC addition on preweaning health and growth. Multivariable linear regression showed that the addition of GAC to CR did not influence passive transfer of IgG, as measured by apparent efficiency of absorption at 24 h of age (CON = 54.0 vs. GAC = 54.3%), serum IgG (CON = 20.3 vs. GAC = 20.2 mg/mL), and serum total protein (CON = 5.69 vs. GAC = 5.68 g/dL). Although study sample sizes were not originally derived to evaluate health outcomes, treatment had no effect on weight gain or incidence of health events (diarrhea, pneumonia, mortality) for heifer calves between birth and 7 wk of age.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2014 · Journal of Dairy Science
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Text: Research is limited regarding best housing and management practices for automated calf feeding systems, particularly in terms of how these factors influence animal health and welfare. This ongoing study is characterizing health scores, morbidity and mortality of group-housed calves in US farms and relating these to housing and management practices. Thirty-eight dairy farms in the Midwest USA were visited every 60 days. During each visit, calves (n=7779) were scored for health using four categories: attitude (0-4); ears (0-4); nose (0-3); eyes (0-3); and cleanliness (an indicator of diarrhea, 0-2), with 0 representing a normal, healthy calf. In addition, blood was drawn from any calves 1-5 days old (n=711) and serum protein concentration was used to assess passive immunity transfer. During each season, milk samples were collected from the mixing container inside the feeder and the tube leading to the nipple for measurement of standard plate count (SPC) and coliform count. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to analyze the relationship between mean SPC and health scores. There was a large variation between farms in calf health. On the 10 farms with the best health scores, a mean of 9.7% (range of 2.9–12.9) of animals displayed abnormal scores for attitude, 3.7% (1.7-5.1) for ears, 12.2% (7.8-14.8) for nose, 7.2% (2.0-11.9) for eyes, and 26.4% (20.1-32.6) for cleanliness. On the 10 farms with the worst health scores, a mean of 22.8% (15.7-30.3) of animals displayed abnormal scores for attitude, 14.4% (10.0-22.5) for ears, 27.2% (22.8-30.6) for nose, 30.3% (22.5-36.4) for eyes, and 54.9% (50.6-60.3) for cleanliness. Mean serum protein across all samples was 5.40 ± 0.74 mg/dl. Mean serum protein by farm was 5.34 mg/dl (minimum=4.27, maximum=6.5). The highest overall bacterial counts were recorded in feeder tube samples (median, coliform=2,550 CFU/ml; SPC=330,000 CFU/ml; Q3=3,350,000). No relationship was observed between tube SPC and attitude, ears, nose, or eyes scores; however, SPC was correlated with calf cleanliness scores (r = 0.26, P = 0.002). The variation in health scores among farms shows that welfare in automated feeder systems can be improved. In addition, results indicate that the cleanliness of automated feeder equipment may influence calf health; however, further data collection and analyses of calf morbidity and mortality should provide a more complete understanding of risk factors. This project is supported by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative competitive grant no. 2012-67021-19280 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Keywords: calf health, automated calf feeders
    No preview · Conference Paper · Jul 2014
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to validate use of the Minnesota Easy Culture System II Bi-Plate and Tri-Plate (University of Minnesota Laboratory for Udder Health, St. Paul) to identify common mastitis pathogens in milk. A total of 283 quarter and composite milk samples submitted to the University of Minnesota Laboratory for Udder Health during the spring of 2010 were cultured simultaneously using 3 methods: standard laboratory culture (reference method) and the Minnesota Easy Culture System II Bi-Plate and Tri-Plate methods. Bi-Plate and Tri-Plate cultures were incubated for 18 to 24 h and interpreted by 2 independent, untrained readers within 5 h of each other. An experienced technician completed the standard laboratory culture. For each sample, all 3 study personnel recorded the culture result (yes/no) for each of the following diagnostic categories: no bacterial growth (NG), mixed (2 organisms), contaminated (3 or more organisms), gram-positive (GP), gram-negative (GN), Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Enterococcus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., and other. For each category, the prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictive values of a positive and negative test were calculated, and the agreement between readers and between each reader and the laboratory was assessed. Specificity, overall accuracy, and negative predictive values were generally high (>80%) for the Bi-Plate and Tri-Plate for each category. Sensitivity and positive predictive values were intermediate (>60%) or high (>80%) for the broad categories of NG, GP, GN, Staphylococcus spp. and Streptococcus spp., and for Staph. aureus, but were generally lower (<60%) for other more specific categories. Similarly, interreader agreement (kappa value) was moderate to substantial (40-80%) for the broad categories of NG, GP, GN, Staphylococcus spp. and Streptococcus spp., and for Staph. aureus and E. coli, but was lower for other categories. The Tri-Plate had a higher sensitivity, accuracy, and negative predictive value for Streptococcus spp., and higher interreader agreement for some of the more specific categories. Our conclusion was that Bi-Plate and Tri-Plate results will be most reliable when used to classify infections in broad diagnostic categories such NG, GP, or GN. The Bi-Plate and Tri-Plate will have intermediate ability to identify infections as being caused by Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., or Staph. aureus.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Journal of Dairy Science
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    ABSTRACT: Calfhood disease is an important problem on many dairy operations that can have substantial effects on heifer survival and productivity, and has economic and welfare impacts. Neonatal calf diarrhea (NCD) and bovine respiratory disease (BRD) are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in young dairy cattle. The objective of this observational study was to investigate factors associated with the risks of morbidity and mortality, and with growth, in commercial dairy heifers calves. A total of 2874 heifer calves from 19 commercial dairy farms in Minnesota and Ontario were enrolled at 1-7 days of age and followed for approximately 3 months. Using cut-points of serum total protein of 5.2 and 5.7g/dl, the incidences of failure of transfer of passive immunity (FTPI) were 11 and 32%, respectively. A cut-point of 5.7g/dl was the most predictive of BRD before 5 weeks of age (sensitivity=40%, specificity=69%). The positive predictive value was poor (PPV=18%), but the negative predictive value was good (NPV=87%). A cut-point of 5.2g/dl was most predictive of death before 5 weeks of age (sensitivity=27%, specificity=89%, PPV=5%, NPV=98%). Serum total protein during the first week of life was a poor predictor of NCD. Over 23% of calves were treated for diarrhea. Risk factors were weight at enrollment, other diseases before 2 weeks of age, and an interaction between season of birth and herd-level incidence of NCD. Almost 22% of calves were treated at least once for BRD. Factors associated with an increased risk of BRD included herd-level incidence of BRD, season of birth, navel dipping, other diseases before 2 weeks of age, failure of transfer of passive immunity, and manual control of temperature in pre-weaning housing. Administration of supplemental antibody products at birth was associated with a reduced incidence of BRD. Overall mortality was 3.5%. Risk of mortality was increased by treatment for BRD and other diseases. The mean average weight gain was 0.95kg/day (range: 0.11-1.62kg/day; SD=0.2). Twinning status, FTP, treatment for NCD or other diseases, and month of birth influenced body weight. This study illustrated relationships among various diseases, mortality, and growth. Furthermore, it demonstrated the importance of colostrum for protection against BRD and improved growth performance, while bringing into question the optimal method of determining failure of transfer of passive immunity.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Preventive Veterinary Medicine
  • Luis A Espejo · Noel Kubat · Sandra M Godden · Scott J Wells
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    ABSTRACT: Objective-To evaluate the effect of delayed exposure of dairy cattle to Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) on the incidence of those cows testing positive for MAP and developing clinical Johne's disease (CJD). Animals-79 cows not exposed to MAP as calves (unexposed cohort) and 260 cows exposed to MAP as calves (exposed cohort). Procedures-Cows in the unexposed cohort were born into 5 MAP-uninfected herds and introduced at various ages into 5 MAP-infected herds where the exposed cohort cows were born and raised. Beginning when each cow was 24 months old, fecal and serum samples were collected annually from 2003 through 2006. Feces were cultured for MAP, and an ELISA was used to analyze serum samples for antibodies against MAP. Date and reason for culling were obtained from herd records. Incidence of positive culture and ELISA results and CJD was compared between unexposed and exposed cohort cows with Cox regression. Results-Compared with exposed cohort cows, the hazard ratios for unexposed cohort cows having positive culture results, having positive ELISA results, and developing CJD were 0.12, 0.03, and 0.001, respectively, and those ratios increased by 2%, 6%, and 17%, respectively, for each month spent in an MAP-infected herd. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Delayed exposure of cows to MAP resulted in lower incidences of positive culture and ELISA results and CJD in those cows, compared with incidences of cows exposed to MAP since birth. The hazard of testing positive for MAP or developing CJD increased with time, regardless of cohort.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2013 · American Journal of Veterinary Research
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this randomized noninferiority clinical trial was to compare the effect of treatment with 3 different dry cow therapy formulations at dry-off on cow-level health and production parameters in the first 100 d in milk (DIM) in the subsequent lactation, including 305-d mature-equivalent (305ME) milk production, linear score (LS), risk for the cow experiencing a clinical mastitis event, risk for culling or death, and risk for pregnancy by 100 DIM. A total of 1,091 cows from 6 commercial dairy herds in 4 different states (California, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin) were randomly assigned at dry-off to receive treatment with 1 of 3 commercial products: Quartermaster (QT; Zoetis Animal Health, Madison, NJ), Spectramast DC (SP; Zoetis Animal Health) or ToMorrow Dry Cow (TM; Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica Inc., St Joseph, MO). All clinical mastitis, pregnancy, culling, and death events occurring in the first 100 DIM were recorded by farm staff using an on-farm electronic record-keeping system. Dairy Herd Improvement Association test-day records of milk production and milk component testing were retrieved electronically. Mixed linear regression analysis was used to describe the effect of treatment on 305ME milk production and LS recorded on the last Dairy Herd Improvement Association test day before 100 DIM. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to describe the effect of treatment on risk for experiencing a case of clinical mastitis, risk for leaving the herd, and risk for pregnancy between calving and 100 DIM. Results showed no effect of treatment on adjusted mean 305ME milk production (QT = 11,759 kg, SP = 11,574 kg, and TM = 11,761 kg) or adjusted mean LS (QT = 1.8, SP = 1.9, and TM = 1.6) on the last test day before 100 DIM. Similarly, no effect of treatment was observed on risk for a clinical mastitis event (QT = 14.8%, SP = 12.7%, and TM = 15.0%), risk for leaving the herd (QT = 7.5%, SP = 9.2%, and TM = 10.3%), or risk for pregnancy (QT = 31.5%, SP = 26.1%, and TM = 26.9%) between calving and 100 DIM.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2013 · Journal of Dairy Science
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    ABSTRACT: The study objective was to compare the efficacy of 3 commercial dry cow mastitis formulations regarding quarter-level prevalence of intramammary infections (IMI) postcalving, cure of preexisting infections over the dry period, prevention of new infections during the dry period, and risk for a clinical mastitis case between calving and 100 d in milk (DIM). A total of 1,091 cows (4,364 quarters) from 6 commercial dairy herds in 4 different states (California, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin) were enrolled and randomized to 1 of the 3 treatments at dry-off: Quartermaster (QT; 1,000,000 IU of procaine penicillin G and 1 g of dihydrostreptomycin; Pfizer Animal Health, New York, NY), Spectramast DC (SP; 500 mg of ceftiofur hydrochloride; Pfizer Animal Health), or ToMorrow Dry Cow (TM; 300 mg of cephapirin benzathine; Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica Inc., St. Joseph, MO). Quarter milk samples were collected for routine bacteriological culture before dry cow therapy treatment at dry-off, 0 to 6 DIM, and 7 to 13 DIM and an on-farm record-keeping system was used to retrieve data on clinical mastitis cases. Noninferiority analysis was used to evaluate the effect of treatment on the primary outcome, risk for a bacteriological cure during the dry period. Multivariable logistic regression techniques were used to describe the effect of treatment on risk for presence of IMI postcalving and risk of a new IMI during the dry period. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to describe the effect of treatment on the risk and time for quarters to experience an episode of clinical mastitis between calving and 100 DIM. The overall crude quarter-level prevalence of infection at dry-off was 19.2%. The most common pathogen isolated from milk samples at dry-off was coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, followed by Aerococcus spp. and other Streptococcus spp. Noninferiority analysis showed no effect of treatment on risk for a cure between dry-off and calving [least squares means (LSM): QT = 93.3%, SP = 92.6%, and TM = 94.0%] and secondary analysis showed no effect of treatment on risk for presence of an IMI at 0 to 6 DIM (LSM: QT = 16.5%, SP = 14.1%, and TM = 16.0%), risk for development of a new IMI between dry-off and 0 to 6 DIM (LSM: QT = 14.8%, SP = 12.3%, and TM = 14.2%), or risk of experiencing a clinical mastitis event between calving and 100 DIM (LSM: QT = 5.3%, SP = 3.8%, and TM = 4.1%). In conclusion, no difference was observed in efficacy among the 3 products evaluated when assessing the aforementioned quarter-level outcomes.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2013 · Journal of Dairy Science
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    Patrick Pithua · Luis A Espejo · Sandra M Godden · Scott J Wells
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to quantify the efficacy of using individual calving pens (ICP) from which manure was removed between successive calving compared with group calving pens (GCP) for limiting transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) in Holstein calves. Every other pregnant cow in three Minnesota MAP endemic herds was assigned to calve in either the ICP or the GCP within 48-72h prior to expected calving. Heifer calves born in the ICP were assigned to the intervention group (n=238) while heifer calves born in the GCP were considered controls (n=211). Calves were separated from their dams as soon as was possible once the calf was found. The intervention within the ICP relative to the GCP was the removal of fecal material in the ICP immediately after each birth. Upon enrollment in 2005, calves were monitored into adulthood. Of the original animals enrolled, 318 were tested for MAP at least once in 2007, 2009, or 2010 using serum ELISA (ICP, n=165; GCP, n=141) and bacterial culture of feces (ICP, n=173; GCP, n=145) tests. Cox regression analysis was performed to evaluate the time until MAP test positivity. Cows born in the ICP had a hazard ratio of 0.37 (95% CI=0.34-0.4) for testing MAP serum ELISA positive, compared with cows born in GCP. Similarly, cows born in the ICP had a hazard ratio of 0.09 (95% CI=0.06-0.14) for testing MAP fecal culture positive, compared with cows born in GCP. The Cox proportional-hazard assumption was violated in both models such that differences observed in the instantaneous hazards of MAP positive outcomes between groups (ICP vs. GCP) subsequently diminished overtime. These findings indicate that using ICP for calving delays exposure to MAP in calves and provides an effective strategy for reducing peripartum MAP transmission risks in herds attempting to limit the impact of paratuberculosis.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2013 · Research in Veterinary Science
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    ABSTRACT: The objective was to conduct a study to investigate if violative meat residues are detected in very young bob veal calves that are fed first-milking colostrum harvested from cows that were dry treated, on-label, with cephapirin benzathine. First-milking colostrum was collected from cows that were given intramammary treatment at dry off, on-label, with cephapirin benzathine (ToMORROW, Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica Inc., St. Joseph, MO). Newborn bull calves meeting study inclusion criteria were removed from their dams shortly after birth and before suckling, and assigned to 1 of 2 trials. For the first trial, 6 treated calves were fed 3.8 L of fresh maternal colostrum and 1 control calf was fed 1.5 doses of a plasma-derived colostrum replacer (Secure Calf Colostrum Replacer, VitaPlus Inc., Madison, WI) within 1 h after birth. For the second trial, 5 treated calves were fed 3.8 L of fresh maternal colostrum and 1 control calf was fed 1.5 doses of Secure Calf Colostrum Replacer within 1 h after birth. All calves were humanely euthanized at 24 h (trial 1) or 48 h (trial 2) of age, and tissues were harvested for antimicrobial residue testing. Samples of maternal colostrum and colostrum replacer were also submitted for antimicrobial residue testing. Kidneys collected from all study calves tested negative for cephapirin benzathine residues when using both the KIS assay (Charm Sciences, Lawrence, MA) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The potential transfer of cephapirin from cows treated on-label at dry off to calves via colostrum may not be a significant source of cephapirin residues in veal tissues.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2013 · Journal of Dairy Science
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    ABSTRACT: Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is one of the most common infectious causes of morbidity and mortality in young dairy cattle. The objective of this randomized clinical trial was to determine the effectiveness of 1 or 2 doses of a 5-way, modified-live viral vaccine, administered to heifer calves before weaning to aid in the prevention of BRD. The hypotheses were that vaccination would reduce the incidence of BRD and mortality, and that 2 doses would be more effective than 1. A total of 2,874 heifer calves from 19 commercial dairy farms in Minnesota and Ontario were enrolled at 1 to 7d of age and were followed until 3mo of age. Calves were randomly assigned to receive a commercial, intramuscular, modified-live vaccine against bovine viral diarrhea virus types 1 and 2, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus type 1, and parainfluenza virus type 3 at 15 to 21d of age (2wk only), 35 to 42d (5wk only), both 2 and 5wk, or sterile saline at both times (unvaccinated controls). The incidence of failure of passive transfer was 11 or 32%, using cut-points of serum total protein of 5.2 and 5.7g/dL, respectively. Overall, 22% of calves were treated at least once for BRD. The incidence risk of naturally occurring BRD was 7.7% before 2wk of age, 8.0% between 2 and 5wk, and 9.5% between 5wk and 3mo of age, and was not different between vaccination groups. Overall mortality throughout the 3-mo study period was 3.5%. Mortality was 1.6% before 2wk of age, 0.5% between 2 and 5wk, and 1.2% between 5wk and 3mo of age. The risk of mortality was not affected by vaccination. Mean average daily gain of 1.07kg/d from 5wk to 3mo of age was not different between vaccine groups. In this population of commercial, home-raised calves, with an overall low incidence of failure of passive transfer, intramuscular vaccination with a multivalent, modified live viral vaccine at 2 or 5wk of age or both was not associated with a decreased risk of BRD or mortality, or with growth until 3mo of age. Reasons for these findings may include interference by maternal antibodies, unresponsiveness of the neonatal immune system, timing of immunity relative to pathogen exposure, disease caused by pathogens other than the viruses in the vaccine, or herd immunity. However, in populations with higher incidence of failure of passive transfer or risk of BRD, calves with low levels of specific antibodies may respond differently to vaccination.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2012 · Journal of Dairy Science
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    ABSTRACT: A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted using 1,071 newborn calves from 6 commercial dairy farms in Minnesota and Wisconsin, with the primary objective being to describe the effects of feeding heat-treated colostrum on serum immunoglobulin G concentration and health in the preweaning period. A secondary objective was to complete a path analysis to identify intermediate factors that may explain how feeding heat-treated colostrum reduced the risk for illness. On each farm, colostrum was collected each day, pooled, and divided into 2 aliquots; then, one aliquot was heat-treated in a commercial batch pasteurizer at 60°C for 60 min. Samples of fresh and heat-treated colostrum were collected for standard microbial culture (total plate count and total coliform count, cfu/mL) and for measurement of immunoglobulin G concentrations (mg/mL). Newborn calves were removed from the dam, generally within 30 to 60 min of birth, and systematically assigned to be fed 3.8L of either fresh (FR, n=518) or heat-treated colostrum (HT, n=553) within 2h of birth. Venous blood samples were collected from calves between 1 and 7d of age for measurement of serum IgG concentrations (mg/mL). All treatment and mortality events were recorded by farm staff between birth and weaning. Regression models found that serum IgG concentrations were significantly higher in calves fed HT colostrum (18.0 ± 1.5 mg/mL) compared with calves fed FR colostrum (15.4 ± 1.5 mg/ml). Survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards regression indicated a significant increase in risk for a treatment event (any cause) in calves fed FR colostrum (36.5%, hazard ratio=1.25) compared with calves fed HT colostrum (30.9%). In addition, we observed a significant increase in risk for treatment for scours in calves fed FR colostrum (20.7%, hazard ratio=1.32) compared with calves fed HT colostrum (16.5%). Path analysis suggested that calves fed HT colostrum were at lower risk for illness because the heat-treatment process caused a significant reduction in colostrum total coliform count, which was associated with a reduced risk for illness as a function of improved serum IgG concentrations.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2012 · Journal of Dairy Science
  • L.A. Espejo · S Godden · W L Hartmann · S J Wells
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    ABSTRACT: This prospective longitudinal observational study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a standardized control program on the incidence of Johne's disease in 8 dairy herds in Minnesota. Depending on recruitment year, herds were followed for between 5 and 10 yr. Program compliance was evaluated using a cohort risk assessment score by birth cohort. Fecal samples from cows in study herds were tested annually using bacterial culture to detect Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP), and serum samples from study cows were tested using an ELISA to detect antibodies to MAP. Clinical Johne's disease was also recorded. Cohort risk assessment score decreased along birth cohorts. Depending on the follow-up period in each herd, 5 to 8 birth cohorts were followed to describe changes in time to MAP bacterial culture positivity, serum ELISA positivity, MAP heavy shedding status, and clinical Johne's disease. The analysis of time to bacterial culture positivity, serum ELISA positivity, heavy fecal shedding status, and clinical Johne's disease using a time-dependent Cox regression indicated a reduction of the instantaneous hazard ratio by birth cohorts and by cohort risk score; however, the strength of association between the cohort risk score and each of the 4 disease outcomes decreased over time. The age at which the cows first tested positive for bacterial culture, serum ELISA, and heavy fecal shedding, and the age of the cows at onset of clinical Johne's disease signs remained constant for all birth cohorts. Based on herd risk scores, overall herds complied with the recommended management practices in the program. Results were consistent with a within-herd reduction of Johne's disease transmission, and that reduction was associated with herd-level management practices implemented as part of the control program.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2012 · Journal of Dairy Science

Publication Stats

2k Citations
180.18 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008-2015
    • Saint Mary's University of Minnesota
      Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • 2001-2015
    • University of Minnesota Duluth
      Duluth, Minnesota, United States
  • 2000-2015
    • Saint Catherine University
      Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • 2005-2014
    • University of Minnesota Morris
      • College of Veterinary Medicine
      Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States
    • St. Joseph's Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota
      Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States