Rolf G Behrents

Saint Louis Zoo, San Luis, Missouri, United States

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Publications (70)84.62 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Our objectives were to evaluate marginal alveolar bone height in the anterior mandible after orthodontic treatment and to assess any correlations between morphologic and treatment changes.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016
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    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015
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    O M Tanaka · E A Araújo · D R Oliver · R G Behrents
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    ABSTRACT: To analyze the stress distribution on the PDL of the maxillary first molar in a mixed dentition Class III malocclusion, using a Hyrax-type appliance and maxillary protraction. A Class III malocclusion in the mixed dentition was reconstructed based on CBCT images. The 3D FEM comprised the maxilla, alveolar bone, right first permanent molar teeth, and PDL and consisted of 1 133 497 nodes and 573 726 elements. Maxillary protraction force was applied to a hook positioned close to the deciduous canines with 600 g and at 15°, 30°, and 45° downward angles to the maxillary occlusal plane. Analysis was carried out from the top and buccal view of the sagittal plane. The magnitude of the stresses at 15°, 30°, and 45° of protraction angulation resulted in the highest stress magnitude being in the region between the distobuccal and palatal roots, as well as on the distal surface of the mesial root. The vector direction in this area showed traction and mesial movement. With 30° and 45° protraction angulations, the stress was located only between the distobuccal and palatal roots, and the vector direction was more extrusive at 15°. The suggested orthodontic movement is in the mesial direction with a small amount of extrusion with 15° angulation and greater extrusion with 30° and 45°. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Orthodontics and Craniofacial Research
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    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics
  • Rolf G Behrents

    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics
  • Rolf G Behrents

    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics
  • Rolf G Behrents

    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics
  • Rolf G Behrents

    No preview · Article · May 2015 · American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics
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    ABSTRACT: Long-term soft tissue response to extraction orthodontic treatment has been a subject of interest for years. The purposes of this study were to investigate long-term soft tissue profile changes in an extraction sample and to compare them with profile changes in an untreated sample. A premolar extraction-treated sample (n = 47) and an untreated control sample (n = 57) were studied. Descriptive statistics were collected, and individual t tests were used for comparison and contrast of the treated and untreated samples. We found that the untreated soft tissue profile changed in the downward and forward direction. The treated soft tissue profile change was similar, but with more of a forward component than in the untreated sample. Most noteworthy was the finding that the soft tissue profiles of both the untreated and the treated samples were similar at the end point. The following conclusions were derived from the study. (1) There was no substantive difference in the soft tissue profiles of the samples, but there were some differences in the directional changes between them. (2) The changes for the untreated sample were the greatest for the lips and the chin, with the change occurring in the downward and forward direction. (3) The soft tissue profiles of the extraction sample also had the greatest measurable changes in the lips and the chin, but the changes had more of a forward component than they did in the untreated sample. (4) Extraction treatment does not adversely impact soft tissue profile changes over time. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics
  • Rolf G. Behrents

    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
  • Rolf G Behrents

    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
  • Rolf G Behrents

    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
  • Rolf G. Behrents

    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
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    ABSTRACT: Background The purpose of this study was to examine changes in mandibular arch dimensions of subjects submitted to either bonded or banded maxillary expansion. Methods The sample comprised of two groups, one with patients who underwent maxillary expansion with banded, Haas-type expanders, retrospectively selected (banded group), and the other patients carefully matched in sex, age, and malocclusion, prospectively observed with bonded, Hyrax-type expanders (bonded group). Each group was composed of 29 subjects evaluated at T1, before maxillary expansion, and T2, after expansion and stabilization. The mandibular arches were evaluated for changes in arch width, depth, and perimeter. Paired and independent Student's t tests were used to compare groups. Results Patients in the banded group experienced significantly more mandibular arch width expansion in the molar region. Both groups experienced a decrease in arch depth; however, the bonded group showed significantly greater loss. Conclusion Rapid maxillary expansion is an effective method for achieving a gain in arch width and space in the maxillary arch and, depending on the type of expander, banded or bonded, it produces a different response on an untreated mandibular arch.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014 · Journal of the World Federation of Orthodontists
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment effects of maxillary posterior tooth distalization performed by a modified palatal anchorage plate appliance with cephalograms derived from cone-beam computed tomography. Methods The sample consisted of 40 lateral cephalograms obtained from the cone-beam computed tomography images of 20 Class II patients (7 men, 13 women; average age, 22.9 years) who underwent bilateral distalization of their maxillary dentition. The lateral cephalograms were derived from the cone-beam computed tomography images taken immediately before placement of a modified palatal anchorage plate appliance and at the end of distalization. Paired t tests were used for comparisons of the changes. Results The distal movement of the maxillary first molar was 3.3 ± 1.8 mm, with distal tipping of 3.4° ± 5.8° and intrusion of 1.8 ± 1.4 mm. Moreover, the maxillary incisors moved 3.0 ± 2.7 mm lingually, with lingual tipping of 6.2° ± 7.6° and insignificant extrusion (1.1 mm; P = 0.06). The occlusal plane angle was increased significantly (P = 0.0001). Conclusions The maxillary first molar was distalized by 3.3 mm at the crown and 2.2 mm at root levels, with distal tipping of 3.4°. It is recommended that clinicians should consider using the modified palatal anchorage plate appliance in treatment planning for patients who require maxillary total arch distalization.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
  • Article: Tribute
    Rolf G Behrents

    No preview · Article · Jul 2014
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    David L. Turpin · Rolf G. Behrents · Ahmad A. Abdelkarim

    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
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    Jessica L Woller · Ki Beom Kim · Rolf G Behrents · Peter H Buschang
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    ABSTRACT: With the advent of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), it is now possible to quantitatively evaluate the effects of rapid maxillary expansion (RME) on the entire maxillary complex in growing patients. The purpose of this study is to use three-dimensional images to evaluate the displacement that occurs at the circummaxillary sutures (frontonasal, zygomaticomaxillary, intermaxillary, midpalatal, and transpalatal sutures) following rapid maxillary expansion in growing children. The CBCT scans of 25 consecutively treated RME patients (10 male, 15 female) with mean age of 12.3 ± 2.6 years, were examined before expansion and immediately following the last activation of the expansion appliance. Statistically significant (P < 0.05) amounts of separation were found for the displacement of the bones of the frontonasal suture, the intermaxillary suture, the zygomaticomaxillary sutures, and the midpalatal suture. The change in angulation of the maxillary first molars due to RME was also statistically significant. There was no statistically significant displacement of the transpalatal suture. Rapid maxillary expansion results in significant displacement of the bones of circummaxillary sutures in growing children.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics
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    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2013 · American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics

Publication Stats

707 Citations
84.62 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2015
    • Saint Louis Zoo
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
  • 2005-2015
    • Saint Louis University
      • Center for Advanced Dental Education "CADE"
      Сент-Луис, Michigan, United States
  • 2000-2006
    • Baylor College of Dentistry
      • Department of Orthodontics
      Dallas, Texas, United States
  • 1987-1996
    • University of Tennessee
      • Department of Orthodontics
      Knoxville, Tennessee, United States
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
      • Division of Biomaterials
      Birmingham, Alabama, United States