Konstantinos Vemmos

University of Thessaly, Iolcus, Thessaly, Greece

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Publications (135)474.42 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: Stroke comprises the leading cause of death in Greece, and more than 40% of the overall lifetime cost for stroke care, represents the acute phase hospitalization. The aim of the present study was to assess the resource utilization and estimate the costs for treatment of stroke patients in an Acute Stroke Unit (ASU). Methods: Patients with first-ever stroke treated in the ASU of an academic hospital in Athens during 2003-2009 were included in the analysis. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) were employed to assess the neurological impairment on admission and the handicap at discharge, respectively. The cost categories measured were: diagnostic investigations, medications, medical and nursing staff, and overhead costs. A generalized linear model was used to predict the mean cost per patient, based on the clinical characteristics of the patients on admission, and during their hospitalization. Results: In total, 784 patients were included in the analysis, with mean age of 72.2 (11.2) and mean length of hospital stay of 12.3 (9.5) days. The mean cost per patient was estimated at €2,864 (2,198), and the mean cost per day at €244 (54). The relevant cost for the mildly handicapped patients was €1,573 (625), while for the severely handicapped patients it was €4,136 (2,538). Delayed discharge was associated with a mean cost of €362 (634) per patient, while the cost for the acute phase management of the patients was €2,445 (2,471). The neurological impairment on admission (NIHSS score) and the delayed discharge, were strong predictors of the mean cost per patient. Conclusions: The costs for treatment of stroke patients in an ASU comprise a significant burden in Greece. Further research should be performed to explore the long-term costs for the treatment of the disease at a nation-wide level.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Clinical neurology and neurosurgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background and purpose: The Prestroke Independence, Sex, Age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (ISAN) score was developed recently for predicting stroke-associated pneumonia (SAP), one of the most common complications after stroke. The aim of the present study was to externally validate the ISAN score. Methods: Data included in the Athens Stroke Registry between June 1992 and December 2011 were used for this analysis. Inclusion criteria were the availability of all ISAN score variables (prestroke independence, sex, age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score). Receiver operating characteristic curves and linear regression analyses were used to determine the discriminatory power of the score and to assess the correlation between actual and predicted pneumonia in the study population. Separate analyses were performed for patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Results: The analysis included 3204 patients (AIS: 2732, ICH: 472). The ISAN score demonstrated excellent discrimination in patients with AIS (area under the curve [AUC]: .83 [95% confidence interval {CI}: .81-.85]). In the ICH group, the score was less effective (AUC: .69 [95% CI: .63-.74]). Higher-risk groups of ISAN score were associated with an increased relative risk of SAP; risk increase was more prominent in the AIS population. Predicted pneumonia correlated very well with actual pneumonia (AIS group: R(2) = .885; β-coefficient = .941, P < .001; ICH group: R(2) = .880, β-coefficient = .938, P < .001). Conclusions: In our external validation in the Athens Stroke Registry cohort, the ISAN score predicted SAP very accurately in AIS patients and demonstrated good discriminatory power in the ICH group. Further validation and assessment of clinical usefulness would strengthen the score's utility further.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases: the official journal of National Stroke Association
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    ABSTRACT: Etiopathological mechanisms underlying ischemic stroke play a crucial role in long-term prognosis. We aimed to investigate the association between the mechanism of stroke due to large vessel disease, and long-term outcome. All consecutive patients registered in the Athens Stroke Registry with atherosclerotic stroke between 1993 and 2010 were included in the analysis. The patients were subdivided into 3 groups according to the presumed underlying mechanism: low-flow infarcts, artery-to-artery embolism, and intrinsic atherosclerosis. They were followed up for up to 10 years or until death. The end points of the study were 10-year all-cause mortality, stroke recurrence, and composite cardiovascular events. Five hundred two patients were classified as follows: 156 (31%) as low-flow (watershed) strokes, 256 (51%) as artery-to-artery embolic strokes, and 90 (18%) as intrinsic atherosclerotic strokes. The cumulative probability of 10-year mortality rate was similar between groups of patients with different stroke mechanisms: 49.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 38.5-61.3) for patients with low-flow mechanism, 47.6% (95% CI, 39.4-55.8) for patients with artery-to-artery embolism, and 48.5% (95% CI, 34.0-63.0) for patients with intrinsic atherosclerosis. Patients in the intrinsic atherosclerosis group had significantly higher risks of recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.19-3.73) compared with those in the artery-to-artery embolism group. Moreover, patients in the intrinsic atherosclerosis and low-flow groups had significantly higher risks of composite cardiovascular events compared with those in the artery-to-artery embolism group (adjusted HR = 1.94; 95% CI, 1.26-3.00; and adjusted HR = 1.64; 95% CI, 1.13-2.38, respectively). Low-flow and intrinsic atherosclerosis strokes are associated with a high risk for future cardiovascular events and stroke recurrence. However, long-term mortality is similar across different subgroups. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases: the official journal of National Stroke Association
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    ABSTRACT: Low socioeconomic status is associated with poorer cardiovascular health. The aim of the present work was to evaluate how social and economic factors influence modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors and thus, acute coronary syndrome or ischemic stroke presence. One thousand participants were enrolled; 250 consecutive patients with a first acute coronary syndrome (83% were male, 60 ± 12 years old) and 250 control subjects, as well as 250 consecutive patients with a first ischemic stroke (56% were male, 77 ± 9 years old) and 250 control subjects. The control subjects were population-based and age-sex matched with the patients. Detailed information regarding their medical records, lifestyle characteristics, education level, financial status satisfaction, and type of occupation were recorded. After controlling for potential confounding factors, significant inverse associations were observed regarding financial status satisfaction and sedentary/mental type occupation with acute coronary syndrome or stroke presence, but not with the educational level. Nevertheless, further evaluation using path analysis, revealed quite different results, indicating that the education level influenced the type of occupation and financial satisfaction, hence affecting indirectly the likelihood of developing a cardiovascular disease event. Social and economic parameters interact with modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors through multiple pathways. Copyright © 2015 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015
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    Full-text · Dataset · Jun 2015
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    Full-text · Dataset · Jun 2015

  • No preview · Conference Paper · Mar 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present interim analysis was to compare the clinical efficacy and safety of the generic clopidogrel besylate (CB) with the innovator clopidogrel hydrogen sulphate (CHS) salt in patient groups eligible to receive clopidogrel. A 2-arm, multicenter, open-label, phase 4 clinical trial. Consecutive patients (n=1,864) were screened and 1,800 were enrolled in the trial and randomized to CHS (n=759) or CB (n=798). Primary efficacy end point was the composite of myocardial infarction, stroke or death from vascular causes, and primary safety end point was rate of bleeding events as defined by Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) criteria. At 6-months follow-up no differences were observed between CB and CHS in primary efficacy end point (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.37 to 1.71; p=0.57). Rates of BARC-1,-2,-3a and -5b bleeding were similar between the two study groups whereas no bleeding events according to BARC-3b, -3c, -4 and -5a were observed in either CHS or CB group. The clinical efficacy and safety of the generic CB is similar to that of the innovator CHS salt, thus, it can be routinely used in the secondary prevention of atherothrombotic events for a period of at least 6 months. (Salts of Clopidogrel: Investigation to ENsure Clinical Equivalence, SCIENCE study Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02126982).
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Current Vascular Pharmacology

  • No preview · Conference Paper · Feb 2015
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    ABSTRACT: We aimed to investigate the association between leukoaraiosis and long-term risk of stroke recurrence adjusting for clinical scores developed and validated for the prediction of stroke risk, such as CHADS2 (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, and stroke or TIA) and CHA2DS2-VASc (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, stroke or TIA, vascular disease, age 65-74 years, sex category). Study population was derived from the Athens Stroke Registry and was categorized in 2 subgroups according to the presence of atrial fibrillation (AF). Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed to assess the independent predictors of stroke recurrence. To investigate whether leukoaraiosis adds to the prognostic accuracy of CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores, we used the likelihood ratio test. Overall model assessment was performed with Nagelkerke R(2) and Harrell C statistic. Kaplan-Meier analyses were also performed. Among 1,892 patients, there were 320 (16.9%) with leukoaraiosis and 670 (35.4%) with AF. In the Kaplan-Meier analysis, there was significant difference in cumulative probability of stroke recurrence between patients with and without leukoaraiosis in the non-AF group (p < 0.01), but not in the AF group (p = 0.46). On Cox multivariate analysis, leukoaraiosis was found to be a significant independent predictor of stroke recurrence only in the non-AF group, in the models adjusting for CHADS2 (hazard ratio: 1.86, 95% confidence interval: 1.35-2.56) and CHA2DS2-VASc (hazard ratio: 1.82, 95% confidence interval: 1.32-2.51) scores. Leukoaraiosis was not a predictor of stroke recurrence in the AF group. Leukoaraiosis did not improve the predictive accuracy of the 2 scores, whether in the non-AF group (Harrell C statistic: 0.56 vs 0.59 [p = 0.31] for the model including CHADS2; 0.56 vs 0.59 [p = 0.44] for the model including CHA2DS2-VASc) or the AF group (Harrell C statistic: 0.63 vs 0.62 for the model including CHADS2; 0.64 vs 0.64 for the model including CHA2DS2-VASc). Leukoaraiosis is an independent predictor of stroke recurrence in non-AF stroke patients. However, leukoaraiosis did not increase the accuracy of the CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores to predict stroke recurrence in AF or non-AF stroke patients. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Although stroke is the fourth cause of death in Western societies, public stroke awareness remains suboptimal. The aim of this study was to estimate stroke risk perception and stroke awareness in Greece through a cross-sectional telephone survey. Methods: A trained interview team conducted this cross-sectional telephone survey between February and April 2014 using an online structured questionnaire. Participants were selected using random digit dialing of landline and mobile telephone numbers with quota sampling weighted for geographical region based on the most recent General Population Census (2011). Results: Between February and April 2014, 723 individuals (418 women [58%], 47.4 ± 17.8 years) agreed to respond. Among all respondents, 642 (88.8%) were able to provide at least 1 stroke risk factor; 673 respondents (93.08%) were able to provide correctly at least 1 stroke symptom or sign. When asked what would they do in case of acute onset of stroke symptoms, 497 (68.7%) responded that they would either call the ambulance or visit the closest emergency department. Only 35.3%, 18.9%, 17.2%, 20.7%, and 15.0% of respondents with atrial fibrillation, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and current smoking, respectively, considered themselves as being in high risk for stroke. Conclusions: Stroke risk perception in Greece is low despite moderate public stroke awareness.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
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    George Ntaios · Konstantinos Vemmos

    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · Stroke
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    ABSTRACT: Background/objectives The most recent ACC/AHA guidelines recommend high-intensity statin therapy in ischemic stroke patients of presumably atherosclerotic origin. On the contrary, there is no specific recommendation for the use of statin in patients with non-atherosclerotic stroke, e.g. strokes related to atrial fibrillation (AF). We investigated whether statin treatment in patients with AF-related stroke is associated with improved survival and reduced risk for stroke recurrence and future cardiovascular events. Methods All consecutive patients registered in the Athens Stroke Registry with AF-related stroke and no history of coronary artery disease nor clinically manifest peripheral artery disease were included in the analysis and categorized in two groups depending on whether statin was prescribed at discharge. The primary outcome was overall mortality; the secondary outcomes were stroke recurrence and a composite cardiovascular endpoint comprising of recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, aortic aneurysm rupture or sudden cardiac death during the 5-year follow-up. Results Among 1602 stroke patients, 404 (25.2%) with AF-related stroke were included in the analysis, of whom 102 (25.2%) were discharged on statin. On multivariate Cox-proportional-hazards model, statin treatment was independently associated with a lower mortality (hazard-ratio (HR): 0.49, 95%CI:0.26–0.92) and lower risk for the composite cardiovascular endpoint during the median 22 months follow-up (HR: 0.44, 95%CI:0.22–0.88), but not with stroke recurrence (HR: 0.47, 95%CI:0.22–1.01, p: 0.053). Conclusions In this long-term registry of patients with AF-related stroke, statin treatment was associated with improved survival and reduced risk for future cardiovascular events.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · International Journal of Cardiology
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The masking effect (ME) is present in masked hypertensive patients; however, both normotensive and hypertensive individuals may show a similar phenomenon. Previous studies have shown that ME has been associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and microalbuminuria in treated hypertensive patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between the magnitude of systolic ME and the extent of common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) development in normotensive individuals and untreated masked hypertensive and hypertensive patients. Participants and methods: A total of 1154 individuals underwent 24 h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring and carotid artery ultrasonographic measurements. The final study population included 360 patients with systolic ME (daytime systolic BP higher than office systolic BP). The participants were divided into three groups according to office and daytime BP values: normotensives, masked hypertensives, and hypertensives. Results: Masked hypertensives presented significantly higher systolic ME (-14.6 mmHg) than their normotensive (-8.2 mmHg) and hypertensive (-9.5 mmHg) counterparts. However, systolic ME was associated significantly with CCA-IMT only in the group of masked hypertensives (r=-0.399, P<0.001). The multivariate linear regression analyses showed significant and independent associations of CCA-IMT with the following factors: age (B=0.028, 95% confidence interval: 0.001-0.055; P=0.044) and systolic ME (B=-0.034, 95% confidence interval: -0.066 to -0.003; P=0.034). A 10 mmHg decrease in systolic ME correlated to an increase of 0.034 mm in the CCA-IMT. Conclusion: Systolic ME was associated significantly with CCA-IMT values in masked hypertensives. Both normotensive and hypertensive participants have failed to show similar associations.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Blood Pressure Monitoring
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    ABSTRACT: Background and purpose: A new clinical construct termed embolic stroke of undetermined source (ESUS) was recently introduced, but no such population has been described yet. Our aim is to provide a detailed descriptive analysis of an ESUS population derived from a large prospective ischemic stroke registry using the proposed diagnostic criteria. Methods: The criteria proposed by the Cryptogenic Stroke/ESUS International Working Group were applied to the Athens Stroke Registry to identify all ESUS patients. ESUS was defined as a radiologically confirmed nonlacunar brain infarct in the absence of (a) extracranial or intracranial atherosclerosis causing ≥50% luminal stenosis in arteries supplying the ischemic area, (b) major-risk cardioembolic source, and (c) any other specific cause of stroke. Results: Among 2735 patients admitted between 1992 and 2011, 275 (10.0%) were classified as ESUS. In the majority of ESUS (74.2%), symptoms were maximal at onset. ESUS were of moderate severity (median National Institute Health Stroke Scale score, 5). The most prevalent risk factor was arterial hypertension (64.7%), and 50.9% of patients were dyslipidemic. Among potential causes of the ESUS, covert atrial fibrillation (AF) was the most prevalent: in 30 (10.9%) patients, AF was diagnosed during hospitalization for stroke recurrence, whereas in 50 (18.2%) patients AF was detected after repeated ECG monitoring during follow-up. Also, covert AF was strongly suggested in 38 patients (13.8%) but never recorded. Conclusions: About 10% of patients with first-ever ischemic stroke met criteria for ESUS; covert paroxysmal AF seems to be a frequent cause of ESUS.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · Stroke
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    ABSTRACT: Masked hypertension (MH) is associated with advanced target organ damage. However, patients with MH constitute a group of individuals with heterogeneous characteristics concerning their ambulatory blood pressure (BP) status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of isolated systolic MH, isolated diastolic MH, and systolic/diastolic MH with carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT). A total of 101 patients with MH underwent carotid artery ultrasonographic measurements. The patients were divided into three groups according to office and daytime BP values: isolated systolic MH, isolated diastolic MH, and systolic/diastolic MH. Patients with isolated systolic (n=36) (0.771 mm) and systolic/diastolic MH (n=37) (0.775 mm) had significantly (P<.05) higher CIMT values than those with isolated diastolic MH (n=28) (0.664 mm), even after adjustment for baseline characteristics and risk factors. Patients with isolated systolic and systolic/diastolic MH presented significantly higher CIMT values compared with patients with isolated diastolic MH.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Journal of Clinical Hypertension
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Several studies have shown that blood pressure (BP) variability derived from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is associated with target organ damage development. However, the use of discontinuous ABPM to assess rapid BP changes is unavoidably limited by the long frequency at which automated measures are scheduled. The aim of our study was to identify whether ABPM-derived variability or short-term beat-to-beat BP variability is better associated with common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) in untreated hypertensive patients. Participants and methods: A total of 85 individuals underwent 24-h ABPM and carotid artery ultrasonographic measurements. Three 5-min recordings of noninvasive beat-to-beat BP were made under standardized conditions. The time rate (TR) of BP variation was defined as the first derivative of the BP values against time. The study population was divided into normotensive and hypertensive participants according to 24-h BP values (130/80 mmHg). Results: Hypertensive patients (n=45) presented significantly higher TR of 24-h BP variation (P<0.05) and beat-to-beat TR of systolic BP variation (P<0.05) than their normotensive counterparts (n=40). The multivariate linear regression analyses in hypertensive patients showed significant and independent associations of CCA-IMT with the following factors: 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) (B=0.065, 95% confidence interval: 0.006-0.124; P=0.033) and TR of beat-to-beat SBP (B=0.013, 95% confidence interval: 0.005-0.020; P=0.002). A 10 mmHg/min increase in the TR beat-to-beat SBP variation correlated to an increase of 0.013 mm in the CCA-IMT values. Conclusion: Short-term beat-to-beat TR of BP variation is associated independently with CCA-IMT values and presents a better predictor of target organ damage involvement than BP variability indexes derived from ABPM.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · Blood Pressure Monitoring
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of the present work was to evaluate the combined role of eating behaviors and to investigate their effect on the likelihood of developing an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or an ischemic stroke. Methodology: During 2009-2010, 1000 participants were enrolled; 250 consecutive patients with a first ACS (83% males, 60±12 years) and 250 control subjects, as well as 250 consecutive patients with a first ischemic stroke (56% males, 77±9 years) and 250 controls. The controls were population-based and age-sex matched with the patients. Detailed information regarding their anthropometric data, medical records and lifestyle characteristics (dietary and smoking habits, physical activity, psychological state and eating practices -using a special questionnaire-) were recorded. Five eating behaviors were selected to compose an eating behavior score for the purposes of this work: adherence to the Mediterranean diet (using the MedDietScore), frequency of breakfast consumption, eating while being stressed, eating while working and skipping meals. Eating behaviors with beneficial health effects were scored with 0, while those with negative effects were assigned score 1. The total range of the score was between 0 and 5. Higher scores reveal "unhealthier" eating practices. Results: After controlling for potential confounding factors, each unit increase of the eating behavior score was associated with 70% (95%CI: 1.29 - 2.22) higher likelihood of developing an ACS. Insignificant associations were observed regarding ischemic stroke. Conclusion: The overall adoption of specific "unhealthy" eating practices seems to have a detrimental effect on cardiovascular health, and especially coronary heart disease.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Appetite
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    ABSTRACT: There is no strong evidence that all ischaemic stroke types are associated with high cardiovascular risk. Our aim was to investigate whether all ischaemic stroke types are associated with high cardiovascular risk. All consecutive patients with ischaemic stroke registered in the Athens Stroke Registry between 1 January 1993 and 31 December 2010 were categorized according to the TOAST classification and were followed up for up to 10 years. Outcomes assessed were cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke recurrence, and a composite cardiovascular outcome consisting of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, acute heart failure, sudden cardiac death, stroke recurrence and aortic aneurysm rupture. The Kaplan–Meier product limit method was used to estimate the probability of each end-point in each patient group. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the independent covariates of each end-point. Two thousand seven hundred and thirty patients were followed up for 48.1 ± 41.9 months. The cumulative probabilities of 10-year cardiovascular mortality in patients with cardioembolic stroke [46.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 40.6–52.8], lacunar stroke (22.1%, 95% CI 16.2–28.0) or undetermined stroke (35.2%, 95% CI 27.8–42.6) were either similar to or higher than those of patients with large-artery atherosclerotic stroke (LAA) (28.7%, 95% CI 22.4–35.0). Compared with LAA, all other TOAST types had a higher probability of 10-year stroke recurrence. In Cox proportional hazards analysis, compared with patients with LAA, patients with any other stroke type were associated with similar or higher risk for the outcomes of overall mortality, cardiovascular mortality, stroke recurrence and composite cardiovascular outcome. Large-artery atherosclerotic stroke and cardioembolic stroke are associated with the highest risk for future cardiovascular events, with the latter carrying at least as high a risk as LAA stroke.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · European Journal of Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Apolipropotein E(apoE) is a plasma protein exhibiting three common isoforms (E2, E3, E4). Its involvement in lipoprotein metabolism may have an impact on stroke occurrence. As results in the literature are inconclusive further studies are needed to elucidate its role. Our objective was to study the role of apoE isoforms and the interplay with environmental risk factors in patients with first ischaemic stroke occurrence in the Greek population. Three hundred and twenty-nine patients with first-ever ischaemic stroke were included in our study. Strokes of cardioembolic origin and patients with autoimmune or prothrombotic syndromes were excluded. A control group of 361 subjects with no stroke history were also included in our study. Risk factors (hyperlipidemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and smoking) were assessed. ApoE alleles were determined in all subjects participating in the study. Genotype ε3/ε3 was found to have a protective role against stroke occurrence compared with other genotypes (odds ratio 0.674, 95% confidence interval 0.480-0.946) especially in the female patient subgroup. In multivariate analysis after adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus and smoking, the role of genotype was limited and outweighed by risk factors in both genders. No association between apoE alleles and BMI, cholesterol, triglycerides or high-density lipoprotein plasma levels was noted. Our study was indicative of a protective role of the ε3/ε3 genotype, especially in female patients. However, risk factors such as age, BMI, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus and smoking have a strong impact on stroke occurrence and outweigh the protective role of the ε3/ε3 genotype.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · European Journal of Neurology

Publication Stats

2k Citations
474.42 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2015
    • University of Thessaly
      • School of Medicine
      Iolcus, Thessaly, Greece
  • 2000-2015
    • Alexandra Regional General Hospital
      Athínai, Attica, Greece
  • 2013
    • University Hospital of Ioannina
      Yannina, Epirus, Greece
  • 2005-2013
    • Harokopion University of Athens
      Athínai, Attica, Greece
    • Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • Evangelismos Hospital
      • Intensive Care Unit
      Athínai, Attica, Greece
  • 2011
    • National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
      • Division of Clinical Therapeutics
      Athens, Attiki, Greece
  • 2004-2005
    • Eginition Hospital Athens
      Athínai, Attica, Greece
  • 1999
    • Κωνσταντοπούλειο νοσοκομείο Νέας Ιωνίας (Η Αγία Όλγα)
      Athínai, Attica, Greece