Larry D Cripe

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States

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Publications (66)393.42 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: More physicians need to acquire the skills of primary palliative care. Medical students' clerkship experiences with death, dying, and palliative care (DDPC), however, may create barriers to learning such skills during residency. Whether professional development is differentially affected by DDPC is unknown. This knowledge gap potentially hinders the development of educational strategies to optimize students' preparedness for primary palliative care. Method: Third-year students submitted professionalism narratives (N = 4062) during their internal medicine clerkship between 2004 and 2011. We identified DDPC-related narratives and then randomly selected control narratives. Narratives were compared by valence (positive or negative) and professionalism-related themes. Results and conclusion: Less than 10% of the narratives were related to DDPC, but the majority was positive. There was a significant overlap in professionalism themes between DDPC and control narratives. The results suggest student preparedness for primary palliative care may be improved by addressing the common professionalism challenges of clinical clerkships.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Single-cell network profiling (SCNP) data generated from multi-parametric flow cytometry analysis of bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) samples collected from patients >55 years old with non-M3 AML were used to train and validate a diagnostic classifier (DXSCNP) for predicting response to standard induction chemotherapy (complete response [CR] or CR with incomplete hematologic recovery [CRi] versus resistant disease [RD]). SCNP-evaluable patients from four SWOG AML trials were randomized between Training (N = 74 patients with CR, CRi or RD; BM set = 43; PB set = 57) and Validation Analysis Sets (N = 71; BM set = 42, PB set = 53). Cell survival, differentiation, and apoptosis pathway signaling were used as potential inputs for DXSCNP. Five DXSCNP classifiers were developed on the SWOG Training set and tested for prediction accuracy in an independent BM verification sample set (N = 24) from ECOG AML trials to select the final classifier, which was a significant predictor of CR/CRi (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve AUROC = 0.76, p = 0.01). The selected classifier was then validated in the SWOG BM Validation Set (AUROC = 0.72, p = 0.02). Importantly, a classifier developed using only clinical and molecular inputs from the same sample set (DXCLINICAL2) lacked prediction accuracy: AUROC = 0.61 (p = 0.18) in the BM Verification Set and 0.53 (p = 0.38) in the BM Validation Set. Notably, the DXSCNP classifier was still significant in predicting response in the BM Validation Analysis Set after controlling for DXCLINICAL2 (p = 0.03), showing that DXSCNP provides information that is independent from that provided by currently used prognostic markers. Taken together, these data show that the proteomic classifier may provide prognostic information relevant to treatment planning beyond genetic mutations and traditional prognostic factors in elderly AML.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Music therapy is a common discretionary service offered within hospice; however, there are critical gaps in understanding the effects of music therapy on hospice quality indicators, such as family satisfaction with care. The purpose of this study was to examine whether music therapy affected family perception of patients' symptoms and family satisfaction with hospice care. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of electronic medical records from 10,534 cancer patients cared for between 2006-2010 by a large national hospice. Logistic regression was used to estimate the effect of music therapy using propensity scores to adjust for non-random assignment. Overall, those receiving music therapy had higher odds of being female, having longer lengths of stay, and receiving more services other than music therapy, and lower odds of being married/partnered or receiving home care. Family satisfaction data were available for 1495 (14%) and were more likely available if the patient received music therapy (16% vs. 12%, P<0.01). There were no differences in patient pain, anxiety, or overall satisfaction with care between those receiving music therapy vs. those not. Patients who received music therapy were more likely to report discussions about spirituality (odds ratio [OR]=1.59, P=0.01), had marginally less trouble breathing (OR = 0.77, P=0.06), and were marginally more likely to receive the right amount of spiritual support (OR = 1.59, P=0.06). Music therapy was associated with perceptions of meaningful spiritual support and less trouble breathing. The results provide preliminary data for a prospective trial to optimize music therapy interventions for integration into clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Journal of pain and symptom management
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted a pilot study to investigate clinical efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A total of 11 patients with de novo AML were treated, including 2 with relapsed and/or refractory disease and 9 older patients with previously untreated AML. Patients with high baseline leukocyte count were excluded. Erlotinib was given orally at 150mg per day continuously in 28-day cycles. The treatment was tolerated well, and no toxicities were observed. An initial reduction in circulating blasts, followed by disease progression, was observed in 2 patients. Nine other patients did not demonstrate any response in blood or bone marrow. Baseline and post-cycle 1 flow-cytometry were performed on bone marrow blasts to investigate signs of differentiation. No immunophenotypic changes suggestive of differentiation were observed. This pilot study did not demonstrate response to standard doses of erlotinib in patients with AML. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · Leukemia Research
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    ABSTRACT: Vosaroxin is a first-in-class anticancer quinolone derivative that intercalates DNA and inhibits topoisomerase II. This study assessed the safety and tolerability of vosaroxin plus cytarabine in patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia. Escalating vosaroxin doses (10-minute infusion; 10-90 mg/m2; days 1, 4) were given in combination with cytarabine on 1 of 2 schedules: schedule A (24-hour continuous intravenous infusion, 400 mg/m2/day, days 1-5) or schedule B (2-hour intravenous infusion, 1 g/m2/day, days 1-5). Following dose escalation, enrollment was expanded at the maximum tolerated dose. Of 110 patients enrolled, 108 received treatment. Maximum tolerated dose was vosaroxin 80 mg/m2 for schedule A (dose-limiting toxicities: grade 3 bowel obstruction and stomatitis), and was not reached for schedule B (recommended phase 2 dose: 90 mg/m2). In the efficacy population (all first relapsed or primary refractory patients treated with vosaroxin 80-90 mg/m2; n=69), the complete remission rate was 25% and the complete remission/complete remission with incomplete blood count recovery rate was 28%. Thirty-day all-cause mortality was 2.5% among all patients treated at 80-90 mg/m2. Based upon these results, a phase 3 trial of vosaroxin plus cytarabine was initiated in patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00541866).
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Haematologica
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    ABSTRACT: This phase 2 study (N = 116) evaluated single-agent vosaroxin, a first-in-class anticancer quinolone derivative, in patients ≥60 years of age with previously untreated unfavourable prognosis acute myeloid leukaemia. Dose regimen optimization was explored in sequential cohorts (A: 72 mg/m2 d 1, 8, 15; B: 72 mg/m2 d 1, 8; C: 72 mg/m2 or 90 mg/m2 d 1, 4). The primary endpoint was combined complete remission rate (complete remission [CR] plus CR with incomplete platelet recovery [CRp]). Common (>20%) grade ≥3 adverse events were thrombocytopenia, febrile neutropenia, anaemia, neutropenia, sepsis, pneumonia, stomatitis and hypokalaemia. Overall CR and CR/CRp rates were 29% and 32%; median overall survival (OS) was 7·0 months; 1-year OS was 34%. Schedule C (72 mg/m2) had the most favourable safety and efficacy profile, with faster haematological recovery (median 27 d) and lowest incidence of aggregate sepsis (24%) and 30-d (7%) and 60-d (17%) all-cause mortality; at this dose and schedule, CR and CR/CRp rates were 31% and 35%, median OS was 7·7 months and 1-year OS was 38%. Overall, vosaroxin resulted in low early mortality and an encouraging response rate; vosaroxin 72 mg/m2 d 1, 4 is recommended for further study in this population. Registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov: #NCT00607997.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · British Journal of Haematology
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    ABSTRACT: We compared survival outcomes following myeloablative (MAT) or cyclophosphamide/fludarabine (Cy/Flu) nonmyeloablative (NMAT) allotransplant for 165 patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in remission or without frank relapse. Patients who received NMAT were more likely to be older, have secondary AML and lower performance status. At a median follow-up of 61 months, median event-free (EFS) and overall (OS) survival were not different between NMAT and MAT in univariate as well as multivariate analyses. Cy/Flu NMAT may provide similar disease control and survival compared to MAT in patients with AML in remission or without frank relapse.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · American Journal of Hematology

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
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    ABSTRACT: FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 receptor (FLT3) internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations result in constitutive activation of this receptor and have been shown to increase the risk of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, substantial heterogeneity in clinical outcomes still exists within both the ITD mutated and unmutated AML subgroups, suggesting alternative mechanisms of disease relapse not accounted by FLT3 mutational status. Single cell network profiling (SCNP) is a multiparametric flow cytometry based assay that simultaneously measures, in a quantitative fashion and at the single cell level, both extracellular surface marker levels and changes in intracellular signaling proteins in response to extracellular modulators. We previously reported an initial characterization of FLT3 ITD-mediated signaling using SCNP. Herein SCNP was applied sequentially to two separate cohorts of samples collected from elderly AML patients at diagnosis. In the first (training) study, AML samples carrying unmutated, wild-type FLT3 (FLT3 WT) displayed a wide range of induced signaling, with a fraction having signaling profiles comparable to FLT3 ITD AML samples. Conversely, the FLT3 ITD AML samples displayed more homogeneous induced signaling, with the exception of patients with low (<40%) mutational load, which had profiles comparable to FLT3 WT AML samples. This observation was then confirmed in an independent (verification) cohort. Data from the second cohort were also used to assess the association between SCNP data and disease-free survival (DFS) in the context of FLT3 and nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutational status among patients who achieved complete remission (CR) to induction chemotherapy. The combination of SCNP read outs together with FLT3 and NPM1 molecular status improved the DFS prediction accuracy of the latter. Taken together, these results emphasize the value of comprehensive functional assessment of biologically relevant signaling pathways in AML as a basis for the development of highly predictive tests for guidance of post-remission therapy.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2013 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Leukemia advance online publication, 2 October 2012; doi:10.1038/leu.2012.264.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2012 · Leukemia: official journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K
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    ABSTRACT: Cellular and interpatient heterogeneity and the involvement of different stem and progenitor compartments in leukemogenesis are challenges for the identification of common pathways contributing to the initiation and maintenance of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here we used a strategy of parallel transcriptional analysis of phenotypic long-term hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), short-term HSCs, and granulocyte-monocyte progenitors from individuals with high-risk (-7/7q-) AML and compared them with the corresponding cell populations from healthy controls. This analysis revealed dysregulated expression of 11 genes, including IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP), in all leukemic stem and progenitor cell compartments. IL1RAP protein was found to be overexpressed on the surface of HSCs of AML patients, and marked cells with the -7/7q- anomaly. IL1RAP was also overexpressed on HSCs of patients with normal karyotype AML and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome, suggesting a pervasive role in different disease subtypes. High IL1RAP expression was independently associated with poor overall survival in 3 independent cohorts of AML patients (P = 2.2 × 10(-7)). Knockdown of IL1RAP decreased clonogenicity and increased cell death of AML cells. Our study identified genes dysregulated in stem and progenitor cells in -7/7q- AML, and suggests that IL1RAP may be a promising therapeutic and prognostic target in AML and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2012 · Blood
  • Brandon M Hardesty · Larry D Cripe

    No preview · Article · Apr 2012 · Leukemia research
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    ABSTRACT: Single cell network profiling (SCNP) is used to simultaneously measure the effects of modulators on signaling networks at the single cell level. SCNP-based biomarker assays predictive of response to induction therapy and relapse risk in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients are being developed. Such assays have typically used bone marrow (BM) as the sample source of blasts. Because circulating peripheral blasts are detectable in ∼65% of AML patients and peripheral blood (PB) sampling is less invasive than BM sampling, this study was performed to assess the effect of sample source on AML blasts signaling as measured in SCNP assay. SCNP using multiparametric flow cytometry was used to evaluate the activation state of intracellular signaling molecules in leukemic blasts under basal conditions and after treatment with modulators in 46 pairs of BM mononuclear cells/PB mononuclear cells. The relationship between readouts of modulated intracellular proteins ("nodes") was measured using linear regression, Bland-Altman method, and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. The majority (156/161) of signaling nodes show strong correlations between paired PB and BM samples independently from the statistical method used. Notable exceptions were two PB samples with almost undetectable levels of circulating blasts compared with paired BM samples. Our results demonstrate that specimen source (BM or PB) does not significantly affect proteomic signaling in patients with AML and circulating blasts. The ability to use PB as a sample source will facilitate the monitoring of cellular signaling effects following administration of targeted therapies and at time points when BM aspirates are not clinically justifiable.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2012 · Cytometry Part B Clinical Cytometry
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    ABSTRACT: Oncologists avoid prognostic discussions due to concerns about increasing patients' anxiety or depression. We sought to determine if perceived prognosis or extent of prognostic discussions predicted anxiety or depression and whether prognostic discussions moderated the relationship between prognosis and anxiety or depression. Men with advanced cancer and their oncologists estimated the likelihood of survival at 6 months and reported extent of prognostic discussions. Anxiety and depression were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Men who died within 6 months reported higher scores on depression but not anxiety. Men who estimated a lower (10%-75%) likelihood of surviving at least 6 months were more depressed and anxious than men who estimated a higher (>90%) likelihood of survival. A similar relationship was seen with oncologists' prognostications. Men who reported having had full prognostic discussions with their oncologist had less depression compared with men who reported having had brief or no discussions. Men for whom the oncologists reported a full discussion had greater anxiety. The relationships between patient-perceived prognosis and depression or anxiety were moderated by extent of prognostic discussions as reported by the patient or oncologist, respectively. Full prognostic discussions are associated with less depression among men who perceive a poor prognosis. Anxiety is increased in men if the oncologists report a full discussion. Oncologists should engage in prognostic discussions but assess for increased anxiety to facilitate coping with advanced cancer.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2012 · Journal of palliative medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1), a tumor suppressor, is a rate-limiting effector in an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-dependent apoptotic pathway. Its expression is epigenetically suppressed in several tumors. A mechanistic basis for epigenetic/transcriptional repression of DAPK1 was investigated in certain forms of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with poor prognosis, which lacked ER stress-induced apoptosis. Heterogeneous primary AMLs were screened to identify a subgroup with Flt3ITD in which repression of DAPK1, among NF-κB-and c-Jun-responsive genes, was studied. RNA interference knockdown studies were carried out in an Flt3ITD(+) cell line, MV-4-11, to establish genetic epistasis in the pathway Flt3ITD-TAK1-DAPK1 repression, and chromatin immunoprecipitations were carried out to identify proximate effector proteins, including TAK1-activated p52NF-κB, at the DAPK1 locus. AMLs characterized by normal karyotype with Flt3ITD were found to have 10- to 100-fold lower DAPK1 transcripts normalized to the expression of c-Jun, a transcriptional activator of DAPK1, as compared with a heterogeneous cytogenetic category. In addition, Meis1, a c-Jun-responsive adverse AML prognostic gene signature was measured as control. These Flt3ITD(+) AMLs overexpress relB, a transcriptional repressor, which forms active heterodimers with p52NF-κB. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays identified p52NF-κB binding to the DAPK1 promoter together with histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) and HDAC6 in the Flt3ITD(+) human AML cell line MV-4-11. Knockdown of p52NF-κB or its upstream regulator, NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK), de-repressed DAPK1. DAPK1-repressed primary Flt3ITD(+) AMLs had selective nuclear activation of p52NF-κB. Flt3ITD promotes a noncanonical pathway via TAK1 and p52NF-κB to suppress DAPK1 in association with HDACs, which explains DAPK1 repression in Flt3ITD(+) AML.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2011 · Clinical Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: Patients experience diverse psychological responses to cancer. Appraisals and coping have been shown to predict psychological responses to stressors. For men with advanced cancer, appraisal of cancer's impact on their lives (illness appraisal) and religious coping may be particularly important predictors of psychological responses. We examined the relationships among illness appraisal, religious coping, and positive and negative psychological responses while controlling for disease and patient characteristics. Eighty-six men with advanced cancer completed measures, including constructed Meaning of Illness Scale, Brief Religious Coping Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale, and Posttraumatic Growth Inventory. Treating oncologists completed questions about disease status and estimated the chances of the patient surviving 6 months. Psychological distress was predicted by prognosis (β = -0.20), illness appraisal (β = -0.48), and negative religious coping (β = 0.24). Negative mental adjustment was predicted by prognosis (β = -0.23) and illness appraisal (β = -0.57). Positive mental adjustment was predicted by illness appraisal (β = 0.46) and positive religious coping (β = 0.29). Posttraumatic growth was predicted by positive religious coping (β = 0.49). Illness appraisal was more consistently associated with psychological responses to advanced cancer than patient or disease characteristics. Consequently, helping patients with their illness appraisals may be effective for improving patient psychological well-being.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2011 · Supportive Care in Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: This study of vosaroxin evaluated dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics (PK), clinical activity and pharmacodynamics in relapsed/refractory leukemia. Dosing was weekly (days 1, 8 and 15) or twice weekly (days 1, 4, 8 and 11). Seventy-three treated patients had a median age of 65 years, 85% had acute myeloid leukemia and 78% had refractory disease. Weekly schedule: 42 patients received 18-90 mg/m(2); MTD was 72 mg/m(2). Twice-weekly schedule: 31 patients received 9-50 mg/m(2); MTD was 40 mg/m(2). DLT was stomatitis; primary non-hematologic toxicity was reversible gastrointestinal symptoms and febrile neutropenia. Thirty-day all-cause mortality was 11%. Five patients had complete or incomplete remissions; median duration was 3.1 months. A morphologic leukemia-free state (bone marrow blast reduction to <5%) occurred in 11 additional patients. Antileukemic activity was associated with total dose or weekly time above 1 μmol/l plasma vosaroxin concentration (P<0.05). Vosaroxin exposure was dose proportional over 9-90 mg/m(2). The average terminal half-life was ~25 h and clearance was non-renal. No induction or inhibition of vosaroxin metabolism was evident. Vosaroxin-induced DNA damage was detected as increased intracellular γH2AX. Vosaroxin had an acceptable safety profile, linear PK and encouraging clinical activity in relapsed/refractory leukemia.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2011 · Leukemia: official journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K
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    Larry D Cripe

    Preview · Article · Jun 2011 · Journal of Clinical Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: In a randomized trial of therapy for FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) mutant acute myeloid leukemia in first relapse, 224 patients received chemotherapy alone or followed by 80 mg of the FLT3 inhibitor lestaurtinib twice daily. Endpoints included complete remission or complete remission with incomplete platelet recovery (CR/CRp), overall survival, safety, and tolerability. Correlative studies included pharmacokinetics and analysis of in vivo FLT3 inhibition. There were 29 patients with CR/CRp in the lestaurtinib arm and 23 in the control arm (26% vs 21%; P = .35), and no difference in overall survival between the 2 arms. There was evidence of toxicity in the lestaurtinib-treated patients, particularly those with plasma levels in excess of 20 μM. In the lestaurtinib arm, FLT3 inhibition was highly correlated with remission rate, but target inhibition on day 15 was achieved in only 58% of patients receiving lestaurtinib. Given that such a small proportion of patients on this trial achieved sustained FLT3 inhibition in vivo, any conclusions regarding the efficacy of combining FLT3 inhibition with chemotherapy are limited. Overall, lestaurtinib treatment after chemotherapy did not increase response rates or prolong survival of patients with FLT3 mutant acute myeloid leukemia in first relapse. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00079482.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2011 · Blood
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    ABSTRACT: Prolonged administration of methyl transferase inhibitors may increase response rates in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Fourteen MDS patients with anemia and less than 10% marrow blasts received azacitidine 50 mg/m(2) thrice weekly for 2 weeks every 4 weeks; 7 also received weekly erythropoietin. The response rate of 43% did not improve the rates reported with other azacitidine administration schedules, so the study was closed. A decreased apoptosis of primitive erythroid progenitors and increased expression of BclX(L) was observed with treatment in responding patients compared to non-responders. Azacitidine may modulate BclX(L) and improve erythropoiesis through reduction of apoptosis in primitive erythroid progenitor population in MDS.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2011 · Leukemia research

Publication Stats

2k Citations
393.42 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1998-2015
    • Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Division of Hematology/Oncology
      Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • 1997-2011
    • Indiana University-Purdue University School of Medicine
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Division of Hematology/Oncology
      Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • 2004
    • Indiana University East
      Indiana, United States
  • 2003
    • Indiana University Bloomington
      Bloomington, Indiana, United States