Tyrone Donnon

The University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

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Publications (57)78.51 Total impact

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    Aliya Kassam · Tyrone Donnon · Michèle Cowan · Joanne Todesco
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    ABSTRACT: Background: In this brief report, we describe two ways in which we assessed the Scholar CanMEDS role using a method to measure residents' ability to complete a critical appraisal. These were incorporated into a modified OSCE format where two stations consisted of 1) critically appraising an article and 2) critiquing an abstract. Method: Residents were invited to participate in the CanMEDS In-Training Exam (CITE) through the Office of Postgraduate Medical Education. Mean scores for the two Scholar stations were calculated using the number of correct responses out of 10. The global score represented the examiner's overall impression of the resident's knowledge and effort. Correlations between scores are also presented between the two Scholar stations and a paired sample t-test comparing the global mean scores of the two stations was also performed. Results: Sixty-three of the 64 residents registered to complete the CanMEDS In-Training Exam including the two Scholar stations. There were no significant differences between the global scores of the Scholar stations showing that the overall knowledge and effort of the residents was similar across both stations (3.8 vs. 3.5, p = 0.13). The correlation between the total mean scores of both stations (inter-station reliability) was also non-significant (r = 0.05, p = 0.67). No significant differences between senior residents and junior residents were detected or between internal medicine residents and non-internal medicine residents. Conclusion: Further testing of these stations is needed and other novel ways of assessing the Scholar role competencies should also be investigated.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The University of Calgary Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship (UCLIC) is an integrated curriculum of at least 32 weeks' duration based in rural communities. Rural LICs have been proposed as a method to respond to the needs of underserved rural communities; therefore, assessing evolving learner interest and demographics over time is of importance to rural communities. Three surveys were administered to first-year medical students at the University of Calgary from the classes of 2009, 2010 and 2015. The surveys assessed demographic information as well as interest in and attitudes toward pursuing a rural-based LIC. Overall, 42% of students (76% of decided students) reported that they would consider the rural UCLIC. Between 2009 and 2010, the proportion of students who would not consider the UCLIC decreased from 25% to 8%, and thereafter was maintained at that level. Over the same period, interest among students considering Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) specialties significantly increased. Although student attitudes about the value of the LIC were consistently positive, students remained concerned about social considerations. There has been an increase in student willingness to consider a rural LIC, most significantly among students interested in RCPSC specialties. Career plans and demographics of students continue to influence their interest in and attitudes toward LICs.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · Canadian journal of rural medicine: the official journal of the Society of Rural Physicians of Canada = Journal canadien de la medecine rurale: le journal officiel de la Societe de medecine rurale du Canada
  • Amy L Warren · Tyrone L Donnon · Catherine R Wagg · Heather Priest
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    ABSTRACT: The teaching of visual diagnostic reasoning skills, to date, has been conducted in a largely unstructured apprenticeship manner. The purpose of this study was to assess if the introduction of two educational interventions improved the visual diagnostic reasoning skills of novices. These were (1) the active use of key diagnostic features and (2) image repetition. A pre-test and post-test research design was used to compare the two teaching interventions to a traditional teaching group and an expert group using eye tracking as an assessment method. The time to diagnosis and the percentage of time spent viewing an area of diagnostic interest (AOI) were compared using independent t-tests, paired t-tests, and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Diagnostic accuracy as a dichotomous variable was compared using chi-square tables. Students taught in an active-learning manner with image repetition behaved most like experts, with no significant difference from experts for percentage of time spent in the AOIs and a significantly faster time to diagnosis than experts (p<.017). Our results from the educational interventions suggest a greater level of improvement in the eye tracking of students that were taught key diagnostic features in an active-learning forum and were shown multiple case examples.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · Journal of Veterinary Medical Education
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    ABSTRACT: A recent randomized trial of patients with primarily anterior circulation intracranial artery stenosis showed that intensive medical therapy was superior to intracranial stenting in preventing recurrent stroke. The rate of stroke recurrence or death in symptomatic intracranial vertebrobasilar stenosis with medical therapy alone may be especially high, and rates compared with endovascular therapy need further study. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies reporting the rates of stroke recurrence or death (the primary outcome) in symptomatic intracranial vertebrobasilar stenosis with medical or endovascular treatment over a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. We included all studies in any language indexed in MEDLINE or EMBASE, supplemented by bibliography searches and by contacting the authors. The secondary endpoints were stroke recurrence, and basilar artery and vertebral artery stroke recurrence rates. 23 studies (592 medical treatment patients and 480 endovascular treatment patients) were included. The risk of combined stroke recurrence or death was 14.8 per 100 person-years (95% CI 9.5 to 20.1) in the medical group compared with 8.9 per 100 person-years (95% CI 6.9 to 11.0) in the endovascular group. The incidence rate ratio was 1.3 (95% CI 1.0 to 1.7). The stroke recurrence rate was 9.6 per 100 person-years (95% CI 5.1 to 14.1) in the medical group compared with 7.2 per 100 person-years (95% CI 5.5 to 9.0) in the endovascular group. Our results showed that the risk of stroke recurrence or death or the risk of stroke recurrence alone was comparable between the medical and endovascular therapy groups. A small preventive effect of endovascular therapy may exist, particularly if the 30 day postprocedural risk is reduced. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Throughout their medical education, learners face multiple transition periods associated with increased demands, producing stress and concern about the adequacy of their skills for their new role. We evaluated the effectiveness of boot camps in improving clinical skills, knowledge, and confidence during transitions into postgraduate or discipline-specific residency programs. Boot camps are in-training courses combining simulation-based practice with other educational methods to enhance learning and preparation for individuals entering new clinical roles. We performed a search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, and ERIC using boot camp and comparable search terms. Inclusion criteria included studies that reported on medical education boot camps, involved learners entering new clinical roles in North American programs, and reported empirical data on the effectiveness of boot camps to improve clinical skills, knowledge, and/or confidence. A random effects model meta-analysis was performed to combined mean effect size differences (Cohen's d) across studies based on pretest/posttest or comparison group analyses. The search returned 1096 articles, 15 of which met all inclusion criteria. Combined effect size estimates showed learners who completed boot camp courses had significantly "large" improvements in clinical skills (d = 1.78; 95% CI 1.33-2.22; P < .001), knowledge (d = 2.08; 95% CI 1.20-2.96; P < .001), and confidence (d = 1.89; 95% CI 1.63-2.15; P < .001). Boot camps were shown as an effective educational strategy to improve learners' clinical skills, knowledge, and confidence. Focus on pretest/posttest research designs limits the strength of these findings.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To examine the effect of simulation-based seizure management teaching on improving caregiver competence and reported confidence with managing seizures. The authors hypothesized that simulation-based education would lead to a higher level of demonstrated competence and reported confidence in family members and caregivers. Simulation has not been previously studied in this context. Methods: A two-group pre- and post-test experimental research design involving a total of 61 caregivers was used. The intervention was a simulation-based seizure curriculum delivered as a supplement to traditional seizure discharge teaching. Caregiver performance was analyzed using a seizure management checklist. Caregivers' perception of self-efficacy was captured using a self-efficacy questionnaire. Results: Caregivers in the experimental group achieved significantly higher postintervention performance scores than caregivers in the control group in both premedication and postmedication seizure management (P<0.01). Additionally, they achieved significantly higher scores on the self-efficacy questionnaire including items reflecting confidence managing the seizure at home (P<0.05). Conclusion: Caregivers receiving the supplemental simulation-based curriculum achieved significantly higher levels of competence and reported confidence, supporting a positive relationship between simulation-based seizure discharge education, and caregiver competence and confidence in managing seizures. Simulation sessions provided insight into caregiver knowledge but, more importantly, insight into the caregiver's ability to apply knowledge under stressful conditions, allowing tailoring of curriculum to meet individual needs. These findings may have applications and relevance for management of other acute or chronic medical conditions.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Paediatrics & child health
  • Elaine L Sigalet · Tyrone L Donnon · Vincent Grant
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract This study provides information for educators about levels of competence in teams comprised of medical, nursing and respiratory therapy students after receiving a simulation-based team-training (SBT) curriculum with and without an additional formalized 30-min team-training (TT) module. A two-group pre- and post-test research design was used to evaluate team competence with respect to leadership, roles and responsibilities, communication, situation awareness and resource utilization. All scenarios were digitally recorded and evaluated using the KidSIM Team Performance Scale by six experts from medicine, nursing and respiratory therapy. The lowest scores occurred for items that reflected situation awareness. All teams improved their aggregate scores from Time 1 to Time 2 (p < 0.05). Student teams in the intervention group achieved significantly higher performance scores at Time 1 (Cohen's d = 0.92, p < 0.001) and Time 2 (d = 0.61, p < 0.01). All student teams demonstrated significant improvement in their ability to work more effectively by Time 2. The results suggest that situational awareness is an advanced expectation for the undergraduate student team. The provision of a formalized TT module prior to engaging student teams in a simulation-based TT curriculum led to significantly higher performances at Time 1 and 2.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · Journal of Interprofessional Care
  • Martina Kanciruk · Jac J.W. Andrews · Tyrone Donnon
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of maternal smoking for the development of childhood overweight and/or obesity. Accordingly, a systematic literature review of English-language studies published from 1980 to 2012 using the following data bases: MEDLINE, PsychINFO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Dissertation Abstracts International was conducted. The following terms were used in the search: pregnancy, overweight, obesity, smoking, parents, childhood, risk factors. Eighteen studies of maternal smoking during pregnancy and obesity conducted in Europe, Asia, North America, and South America met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis of these studies indicated that maternal smoking during pregnancy is a significant risk factor for overweight and obesity; mothers who smoke during pregnancy are at a greater risk for developing obesity or overweight; the quantity of cigarettes consumed by the mother during pregnancy influenced the odds of offspring overweight and/or obesity. In addition, the results from moderator analyses suggest that part of the heterogeneity discovered between the studies can be explained by the region of world that the study occurred in and the age of the child at the time of weight assessment.
    No preview · Article · May 2014
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to develop a surgical skills program for first-year surgical residents by integrating the Canadian Medical Education Direction for Specialists (CanMEDS) roles. A 9-week course combining basic surgical skills and CanMEDS roles was developed and provided to 24 residents from the Departments of Surgery and Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Calgary. Sessions consisted of a pretest/posttest, teaching the surgical skills, supervised practice, posttest, and teaching CanMEDS roles. The pretest scores indicated the residents' preparation and understanding of the session, which improved as the course progressed. The residents' satisfaction surveys graded on a scale from 1 to 5, syllabus content, syllabus effectiveness, teaching expectations, technical demonstrations, practice sessions, confidence gained, and bench model fidelity indicated a mean of 4.09 (standard deviation = 0.81) satisfaction with the new course. Similarly, preceptors' satisfaction surveys graded on a scale from 1 to 5 demonstrated a mean of 4.16 (standard deviation = 0.69) satisfaction. Surgical skills and CanMEDS roles of communication, professionalism, collaborator and manager, can be taught simultaneously proving that this new teaching format can be feasible, effective, and logistically convenient, providing a satisfying experience for both residents and preceptors.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Journal of Surgical Education
  • Martina Kanciruk · Jac J.W. Andrews · Tyrone Donnon
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of history of obesity for the development of childhood overweight and/or obesity. Accordingly, a systematic literature review of English-language studies published from 1980 to 2012 using the following data bases: MEDLINE, PsychINFO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Dissertation Abstracts International was conducted. The following terms were used in the search: pregnancy, overweight, obesity, family history, parents, childhood, risk factors. Eleven studies of family history and obesity conducted in Europe, Asia, North America, and South America met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis of these studies indicated that family history of obesity is a significant risk factor of overweight and /or obesity in offspring; risk for offspring overweight and/or obesity associated with family history varies depending of the family members included in the analysis; and when family history of obesity is present, the offspring are at greater risk for developing obesity or overweight. In addition, the results from moderator analyses suggest that part of the heterogeneity discovered between the studies can be explained by the region of world that the study occurred in and the age of the child at the time of weight assessment.
    No preview · Article · May 2014
  • Aliya Kassam · Tyrone Donnon · Ian Rigby
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    ABSTRACT: Background:There is a question of whether a single assessment tool can assess the key competencies of residents as mandated by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada CanMEDS roles framework.Objective:The objective of the present study was to investigate the reliability and validity of an emergency medicine (EM) in-training evaluation report (ITER).Method:ITER data from 2009 to 2011 were combined for residents across the 5 years of the EM residency training program. An exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation was used to explore the construct validity of the ITER. A total of 172 ITERs were completed on residents across their first to fifth year of training.Results:A combined, 24-item ITER yielded a five-factor solution measuring the CanMEDs role Medical Expert/Scholar, Communicator/Collaborator, Professional, Health Advocate and Manager subscales. The factor solution accounted for 79% of the variance, and reliability coefficients (Cronbach alpha) ranged from α = 0.90 to 0.95 for each subscale and α = 0.97 overall. The combined, 24-item ITER used to assess residents' competencies in the EM residency program showed strong reliability and evidence of construct validity for assessment of the CanMEDS roles.Conclusion:Further research is needed to develop and test ITER items that will differentiate each CanMEDS role exclusively.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2014 · Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis on the construct and criterion validity of multi-source feedback (MSF) to assess physicians and surgeons in practice. In this study, we followed the guidelines for the reporting of observational studies included in a meta-analysis. In addition to PubMed and MEDLINE databases, the CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched from January 1975 to November 2012. All articles listed in the references of the MSF studies were reviewed to ensure that all relevant publications were identified. All 35 articles were independently coded by two authors (AA, TD), and any discrepancies (eg, effect size calculations) were reviewed by the other authors (KA, AD, CV). Physician/surgeon performance measures from 35 studies were identified. A random-effects model of weighted mean effect size differences (d) resulted in: construct validity coefficients for the MSF system on physician/surgeon performance across different levels in practice ranged from d=0.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40-0.69) to d=1.78 (95% CI 1.20-2.30); construct validity coefficients for the MSF on physician/surgeon performance on two different occasions ranged from d=0.23 (95% CI 0.13-0.33) to d=0.90 (95% CI 0.74-1.10); concurrent validity coefficients for the MSF based on differences in assessor group ratings ranged from d=0.50 (95% CI 0.47-0.52) to d=0.57 (95% CI 0.55-0.60); and predictive validity coefficients for the MSF on physician/surgeon performance across different standardized measures ranged from d=1.28 (95% CI 1.16-1.41) to d=1.43 (95% CI 0.87-2.00). The construct and criterion validity of the MSF system is supported by small to large effect size differences based on the MSF process and physician/surgeon performance across different clinical and nonclinical domain measures.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014
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    Dataset: pg8
    Justin Leblanc · Tyrone Donnon · Carol Hutchison · Paul Duffy

    Full-text · Dataset · Feb 2014
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    Justin Leblanc · Tyrone Donnon · Carol Hutchison · Paul Duffy
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    ABSTRACT: In surgery, preoperative handover of surgical trauma patients is a process that must be made as safe as possible. We sought to determine vital clinical information to be transferred between patient care teams and to develop a standardized handover checklist. We conducted standardized small-group interviews about trauma patient handover. Based on this information, we created a questionnaire to gather perspectives from all Canadian Orthopaedic Association (COA) members about which topics they felt would be most important on a handover checklist. We analyzed the responses to develop a standardized handover checklist. Of the 1106 COA members, 247 responded to the questionnaire. The top 7 topics felt to be most important for achieving patient safety in the handover were comorbidities, diagnosis, readiness for the operating room, stability, associated injuries, history/mechanism of injury and outstanding issues. The expert recommendations were to have handover completed the same way every day, all appropriate radiographs available, adequate time, all appropriate laboratory work and more time to spend with patients with more severe illness. Our main recommendations for safe handover are to use standardized checklists specific to the patient and site needs. We provide an example of a standardized checklist that should be used for preoperative handovers. To our knowledge, this is the first checklist for handover developed by a group of experts in orthopedic surgery, which is both manageable in length and simple to use.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    ABSTRACT: The use of multisource feedback (MSF) or 360-degree evaluation has become a recognized method of assessing physician performance in practice. The purpose of the present systematic review was to investigate the reliability, generalizability, validity, and feasibility of MSF for the assessment of physicians. The authors searched the EMBASE, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, PubMed, and CINAHL databases for peer-reviewed, English-language articles published from 1975 to January, 2013. Studies were included if they met the following inclusion criteria: used one or more MSF instruments to assess physician performance in practice; reported psychometric evidence of the instrument(s) in the form of reliability, generalizability coefficients, and construct or criterion-related validity; and provided information regarding the administration or feasibility of the process in collecting the feedback data. Of the 96 full-text articles assessed for eligibility, 43 articles were included. The use of MSF has been shown to be an effective method for providing feedback to physicians from a multitude of specialties about their clinical and nonclinical (i.e., professionalism, communication, interpersonal relationship, management) performance. In general, assessment of physician performance was based on the completion of the MSF instruments by 8 medical colleagues, 8 coworkers, and 25 patients to achieve adequate reliability and generalizability coefficients of α ≥ 0.90 and Ep ≥ 0.80, respectively. The use of MSF employing medical colleagues, coworkers, and patients as a method to assess physicians in practice has been shown to have high reliability, validity, and feasibility.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · Academic medicine: journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
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    ABSTRACT: Background The purpose of this study was to develop a surgical skills program for first-year surgical residents by integrating the Canadian Medical Education Direction for Specialists (CanMEDS) roles. Methods A 9-week course combining basic surgical skills and CanMEDS roles was developed and provided to 24 residents from the Departments of Surgery and Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Calgary. Sessions consisted of a pretest/posttest, teaching the surgical skills, supervised practice, posttest, and teaching CanMEDS roles. Results The pretest scores indicated the residents’ preparation and understanding of the session, which improved as the course progressed. The residents’ satisfaction surveys graded on a scale from 1 to 5, syllabus content, syllabus effectiveness, teaching expectations, technical demonstrations, practice sessions, confidence gained, and bench model fidelity indicated a mean of 4.09 (standard deviation = 0.81) satisfaction with the new course. Similarly, preceptors’ satisfaction surveys graded on a scale from 1 to 5 demonstrated a mean of 4.16 (standard deviation = 0.69) satisfaction. Conclusions Surgical skills and CanMEDS roles of communication, professionalism, collaborator and manager, can be taught simultaneously proving that this new teaching format can be feasible, effective, and logistically convenient, providing a satisfying experience for both residents and preceptors.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Journal of Surgical Education
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    Justin Leblanc · Carol Hutchison · Yaoping Hu · Tyrone Donnon
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    ABSTRACT: Surgical simulators provide a safe environment to learn and practise psychomotor skills. A goal for these simulators is to achieve high levels of fidelity. The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable surgical simulator fidelity questionnaire and to assess whether a newly developed virtual haptic simulator for fixation of an ulna has comparable levels of fidelity as Sawbones. Simulator fidelity questionnaires were developed. We performed a stratified randomized study with surgical trainees. They performed fixation of the ulna using a virtual simulator and Sawbones. They completed the fidelity questionnaires after each procedure. Twenty-two trainees participated in the study. The reliability of the fidelity questionnaire for each separate domain (environment, equipment, psychological) was Cronbach α greater than 0.70, except for virtual environment. The Sawbones had significantly higher levels of fidelity than the virtual simulator (p < 0.001) with a large effect size difference (Cohen d < 1.3). The newly developed fidelity questionnaire is a reliable tool that can potentially be used to determine the fidelity of other surgical simulators. Increasing the fidelity of this virtual simulator is required before its use as a training tool for surgical fixation. The virtual simulator brings with it the added benefits of repeated, independent safe use with immediate, objective feedback and the potential to alter the complexity of the skill.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2013 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to conduct a systematic literature review of multisource feedback (MSF) instruments and to summarize the evidence of feasibility, reliability, generalizability, validity and other psychometric characteristics of the instruments. Accordingly, we conducted a systematic literature review for English-language studies published from 1975 to 2012 using the following data bases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PubMed and PsychINFO. The following terms were used in the search: multisource-feedback, 360 degree evaluation, and assessment of medical professionalism. Forty-eight studies conducted in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, Netherlands, China and elsewhere met the inclusion criteria. The results indicate that MSF has adequate evidence of validity, reliability, and feasibility for providing health practitioners with quality improvement data (both formative and summative assessment) as part of an overall strategy of maintaining competence and certification. Professional psychology has not adopted MSF as a systematic competence–based method for evaluating, maintaining, and assuring competent practice of psychology and instead relies on self-assessment as the primary quality assurance approach for its public accountability. We make recommendations to adopt a MSF system of competence-based assessment of practicing psychologists by regulatory and licensing authorities in Canada and the United States.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2013 · Professional Psychology Research and Practice
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The assessment, maintenance of competence, and recertification for surgeons have recently received increased attention from many health organizations. Assessment of physicians' competencies with multisource feedback (MSF) has become widespread in recent years. The aim of the present study was to investigate further the use of MSF for assessing surgical practice by conducting a systematic review of the published research. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted to identify the use of MSF in surgical settings. The search was conducted using the electronic databases EMBASE, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, PubMed, and CINAHL for articles in English up to August 2012. Studies were included if they reported information about at least 1 out of feasibility, reliability, generalizability, and validity of the MSF. Results: A total of 780 articles were identified with the initial search and 772 articles were excluded based on the exclusion criteria. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. Reliability (Cronbach α ≥ 0.90) was reported in 4 studies and generalizability (Ep2 ≥ 0.70) was reported in 4 studies. Evidence for content, criterion-related, and construct validity was reported in all 8 studies. Conclusion: MSF is a feasible, reliable, and valid method to assess surgical practice, particularly for nontechnical competencies such as communication skills, interpersonal skills, collegiality, humanism, and professionalism. Meanwhile, procedural competence needs to be assessed by different assessment methods. Further implementation for the use of MSF is desirable.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013 · Journal of Surgical Education
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Interprofessional simulation-based team training is strongly endorsed as a potential solution for improving teamwork in health care delivery. Unfortunately, there are few teamwork evaluation instruments. The present study developed and tested the psychometric characteristics of the newly developed KidSIM Team Performance Scale checklist. Method: A quasi-experimental research design engaging a convenience sample of 196 undergraduate medical, nursing, and respiratory therapy students was completed in the 2010-2011 academic year. Multidisciplinary student teams participated in a simulation-based curriculum that included the completion of two acute illness management scenarios, resulting in 282 independent reviews by evaluators from medicine, nursing, and respiratory therapy. The authors investigated the underlying factors of the performance checklist and examined the performance scores of an experimental and a control team-training-curriculum group. Results: Participation in the supplemental team training curriculum was related to higher team performance scores (P < .001). All teams at Time 2 achieved higher scores than at Time 1 (P < .05). The reliability coefficient for the total performance scale was α = 0.90. Factor analysis supported a three-factor solution (accounting for 67.9% of the variance) with an emphasis on roles and responsibilities (five items) and communication (six items) subscale factors. Conclusions: When simulation is used in acute illness management training, the KidSIM Team Performance Scale provides reliable, valid score interpretation of undergraduates' team process based on communication effectiveness and identification of roles and responsibilities. Implementation of a supplementary team training curriculum significantly enhances students' performance in multidisciplinary simulation-based scenarios at the undergraduate level.
    No preview · Article · May 2013 · Academic medicine: journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges