Roman Guggenberger

University of Zurich, Zürich, Zurich, Switzerland

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Publications (40)116.5 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To determine the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in gout. Methods: Forty-three patients with (n = 20) and without a history of gout (n = 23) showing non-specific soft tissue deposits underwent DECT after unrewarding arthrocentesis. Two blinded, independent readers evaluated DECT for the presence of urate crystals. Clinical diagnosis, clinically suspected urate crystal locations, diagnostic thinking and therapeutic decisions were noted before and after DECT. Clinical 1-month follow-up was obtained. Results: DECT showed urate in 26/43 patients (60 %). After DECT, clinical diagnosis of gout was withdrawn in 17/43 (40 %) and was maintained in 16/43 patients (37 %). In 10/43 patients (23 %) the diagnosis was maintained, but DECT revealed urate in clinically unsuspected locations. In 23/43 patients (53 %), a treatment-change based on DECT occurred. Changes in diagnostic thinking occurred more frequently in patients without a history of gout (p < 0.001), changes in therapeutic decisions more frequently in patients with a history of gout (p = 0.014). Clinical follow-up indicated beneficial effects of DECT-based diagnoses in 83 % of patients. Conclusions: In patients with or without a history of gout and a recent suspicion for gouty arthritis with an unrewarding arthrocentesis, DECT has a marked diagnostic and therapeutic impact when hyperdense soft-tissue deposits are present. Key points: • This study evaluates the concept of evidence-based radiology • In patients with suspected gout, DECT can help clinicians make the diagnosis • DECT has a marked impact on therapy • Clinical follow-up after 1 month indicated reliable results of DECT.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · European Radiology
  • K. Martini · A. Becker · R. Guggenberger · G. Andreisek · T. Frauenfelder
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To determine the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis in depicting osteoarthritic lesions in comparison to conventional radiographs, with use of computed tomography (CT) as standard-of-reference. Methods: Imaging of 12 cadaveric hands was performed with tomosynthesis in dorso-palmar (dp) projection, conventional radiographs (dp) and multi-detector CT. Distal interphalangeal joint (DIP)II, DIPIII, proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP)II, PIPIII, first carpometacarpal (CMC) and scaphotrapezotrapezoidal joint (STT) were graded by two independent readers using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) score. The mean score for each feature was calculated for all modalities. Additional wrists were evaluated for presence of calcium pyrophosphate disease (CPPD). CT served as reference-standard. Inter-reader agreement (ICC) was calculated. Results: Comparing tomosynthesis and conventional radiographs to CT, the sensitivity for the presence of osteophytes was 95,7% vs. 65,2%; for joint space narrowing 95,8% vs. 52,1%; for subchondral sclerosis 61,5% vs. 51,3%; for lateral deformity 83,3% vs. 83.3%; and for subchondral cysts 45,8% vs. 29,2%. Erosions were not present. While tomosynthesis showed no significant difference in OARSI score grading to CT (mean OARSI-score CT: 16.8, SD=10.6; mean OARSI-score Tomosynthesis: 16.3, SD=9.6; p=0.84), conventional radiographs had significant lower mean OARSI scores (mean OARSI-score X-ray: 11.1, SD=8.3; p=0.04). Inter-reader agreement for OARSI scoring was excellent (ICC= 0.99). CPPD calcifications present in CT, were also visible with tomosynthesis, but not with conventional radiography. Conclusion: In conclusion, tomosynthesis depicts more osteoarthritic changes in the small joints of the hand than conventional radiography using the OARSI scoring system and CT as the standard of reference.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Osteoarthritis and Cartilage
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, technological advances have allowed manufacturers to implement dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) on clinical scanners. With its unique ability to differentiate basis materials by their atomic number, DECT has opened new perspectives in imaging. DECT has been successfully used in musculoskeletal imaging with applications ranging from detection, characterization, and quantification of crystal and iron deposits, to simulation of noncalcium (improving the visualization of bone marrow lesions) or noniodine images. Furthermore, the data acquired with DECT can be postprocessed to generate monoenergetic images of varying kiloelectron volts, providing new methods for image contrast optimization as well as metal artifact reduction. The first part of this article reviews the basic principles and technical aspects of DECT including radiation dose considerations. The second part focuses on applications of DECT to musculoskeletal imaging including gout and other crystal-induced arthropathies, virtual noncalcium images for the study of bone marrow lesions, the study of collagenous structures, applications in computed tomography arthrography, as well as the detection of hemosiderin and metal particles.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Seminars in musculoskeletal radiology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To assess differences in fat signal fraction (FSF) in skeletal muscle as determined by two-point Dixon technique at 3T before and after application of intravenous gadoterate meglumide (Gd-DOTA). Materials and methods: Eight patients (mean age, 50.8 years; range, 41-72 years) underwent clinical whole-body MRI at 3T for myopathic symptoms. Two-point Dixon technique based T1-weighted turbo spin-echo images were acquired before and after the administration of intravenous Gd-DOTA. On both image sets, the FSF was calculated in the gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, and quadriceps muscles bilaterally. Pre- and post-contrast FSF values were compared by linear regression, Bland-Altman plot as well as paired Student t-tests with Bonferroni correction. Results: The mean pre- and post-contrast FSF of included muscles were 28.7%±14.9% and 27.8%±15.1%, respectively. Linear regression indicated almost equivalent FSF estimation between pre- and post-contrast measurements (sum of squared residuals R(2), 0.92±0.04; slope, 0.97; X-intercept, -0.05; Y-intercept, +0.05). The Bland-Altman plot revealed a minimal systematical bias of the post-contrast FSF measurements of -0.87%. Paired Student t-tests did not reveal significant differences (overall p-value, 0.168). Conclusion: Gd-DOTA does not significantly influence FSF quantification in skeletal muscle based on the two-point Dixon technique at 3T.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · European journal of radiology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the median nerve using simultaneous multi-slice echo planar imaging (EPI) with blipped CAIPIRINHA. Materials and methods: After federal ethics board approval, MR imaging of the median nerves of eight healthy volunteers (mean age, 29.4 years; range, 25-32) was performed at 3 T using a 16-channel hand/wrist coil. An EPI sequence (b-value, 1,000 s/mm(2); 20 gradient directions) was acquired without acceleration as well as with twofold and threefold slice acceleration. Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD) and quality of nerve tractography (number of tracks, average track length, track homogeneity, anatomical accuracy) were compared between the acquisitions using multivariate ANOVA and the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Acquisition time was 6:08 min for standard DTI, 3:38 min for twofold and 2:31 min for threefold acceleration. No differences were found regarding FA (standard DTI: 0.620 ± 0.058; twofold acceleration: 0.642 ± 0.058; threefold acceleration: 0.644 ± 0.061; p ≥ 0.217) and MD (standard DTI: 1.076 ± 0.080 mm(2)/s; twofold acceleration: 1.016 ± 0.123 mm(2)/s; threefold acceleration: 0.979 ± 0.153 mm(2)/s; p ≥ 0.074). Twofold acceleration yielded similar tractography quality compared to standard DTI (p > 0.05). With threefold acceleration, however, average track length and track homogeneity decreased (p = 0.004-0.021). Conclusion: Accelerated DTI of the median nerve is feasible. Twofold acceleration yields similar results to standard DTI. Key points: • Standard DTI of the median nerve is limited by its long acquisition time. • Simultaneous multi-slice acquisition is a new technique for accelerated DTI. • Accelerated DTI of the median nerve yields similar results to standard DTI.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · European Radiology
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this ex vivo study was to assess the performance of monoenergetic dual-energy CT (DECT) reconstructions to reduce metal artefacts in bodies with orthopedic devices in comparison with standard single-energy CT (SECT) examinations in forensic imaging. Forensic and clinical impacts of this study are also discussed. Thirty metallic implants in 20 consecutive cadavers with metallic implants underwent both SECT and DECT with a clinically suitable scanning protocol. Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105, 120, and 130 keV and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimized image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. Image quality of the seven monoenergetic images and of the corresponding SECT image was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively by visual rating and measurements of attenuation changes induced by streak artefact. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed statistically significant differences between monoenergetic DECT extrapolated images and SECT, with improvements in diagnostic assessment in monoenergetic DECT at higher monoenergies. The mean value of OPTkeV was 137.6 ± 4.9 with a range of 130 to 148 keV. This study demonstrates that monoenergetic DECT images extrapolated at high energy levels significantly reduce metallic artefacts from orthopedic implants and improve image quality compared to SECT examination in forensic imaging.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Skeletal Radiology
  • Lukas Filli · Britta Maurer · Andrei Manoliu · Gustav Andreisek · Roman Guggenberger
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate whether imaging of the trunk could be omitted in patients with inflammatory myopathies without losing diagnostic accuracy using a restricted whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (rWB-MRI) protocol. After approval by the institutional review board, this study was performed in 63 patients (male/female, 13/50; median age, 52 years; range, 20-81 years) with new-onset myopathic symptoms (group 1, n = 41) or previously diagnosed inflammatory myopathy (group 2, n = 22). After performing whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) at 3.0 Tesla, myositis and fatty atrophy were evaluated in different muscles by two independent radiologists. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated to evaluate inter-observer reliability. Acquisition time was 56:01 minutes for WB-MRI and 37:37 minutes (32.8 % shorter) for rWB-MRI. In group 1, 14 patients were diagnosed with inflammatory myopathy based on muscle biopsy. rWB-MRI and WB-MRI showed equal sensitivity (42.9 %) and specificity (100 %) for myositis, and showed equal sensitivity (71.4 %) and similar specificity (63.0 % and 48.1 %, respectively) for fatty atrophy. No myositis was found in the body trunk in any patient. Inter-observer reliability was between substantial and perfect (ICC, 0.77-1.00). rWB-MRI showed diagnostic accuracy similar to WB-MRI for inflammatory myopathy at markedly reduced overall acquisition time. • Whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) is a time-consuming imaging modality. • A shortened MRI protocol was evaluated for inflammatory myopathies. • The proposed protocol showed diagnostic accuracy similar to WB-MRI.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · European Radiology
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of accelerated diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of skeletal muscle using echo planar imaging (EPI) applying simultaneous multislice excitation with a blipped controlled aliasing in parallel imaging results in higher acceleration unaliasing technique. After federal ethics board approval, the lower leg muscles of 8 healthy volunteers (mean [SD] age, 29.4 [2.9] years) were examined in a clinical 3-T magnetic resonance scanner using a 15-channel knee coil. The EPI was performed at a b value of 500 s/mm without slice acceleration (conventional DTI) as well as with 2-fold and 3-fold acceleration. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were measured in all 3 acquisitions. Fiber tracking performance was compared between the acquisitions regarding the number of tracks, average track length, and anatomical precision using multivariate analysis of variance and Mann-Whitney U tests. Acquisition time was 7:24 minutes for conventional DTI, 3:53 minutes for 2-fold acceleration, and 2:38 minutes for 3-fold acceleration. Overall FA and MD values ranged from 0.220 to 0.378 and 1.595 to 1.829 mm/s, respectively. Two-fold acceleration yielded similar FA and MD values (P ≥ 0.901) and similar fiber tracking performance compared with conventional DTI. Three-fold acceleration resulted in comparable MD (P = 0.199) but higher FA values (P = 0.006) and significantly impaired fiber tracking in the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles (number of tracks, P < 0.001; anatomical precision, P ≤ 0.005). Simultaneous multislice EPI with blipped controlled aliasing in parallel imaging results in higher acceleration can remarkably reduce acquisition time in DTI of skeletal muscle with similar image quality and quantification accuracy of diffusion parameters. This may increase the clinical applicability of muscle anisotropy measurements.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Investigative radiology
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    ABSTRACT: In this study we investigated the potential prognostic role of morphological and quantitative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in patients with brainstem cavernoma (BSC) in terms of post-operative outcome. In this retrospective study of 14 brainstem cavernoma patients we analyzed pre- and postoperative DTI data. White matter tractography (WMT) of corticospinal tracts (CSTs) was performed using the Fiber Assignment by Continuous Tracking (FACT) algorithm and morphologic characteristics of CSTs were compared with clinically assessed motor strength. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were measured in ipsi- and contralesional regions of interest (ROIs) at the lesion level, as well as levels caudal and rostral to the lesion. Correlation analysis was performed between lateral index (LI) of ipsi-/contralateral FA and ADC values and patients' motor function. Preoperatively, normal morphological features of CSTs corresponded to normal motor function in 4 patients. The other 10 morphologically abnormal pre-operative CSTs didn't show corresponding motor impairment either in pre- or post-operative follow-up period. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values of WMT morphology on pre-operative motor function were 100%, 57.1%, 70% and 100% respectively. The corresponding values on follow-up motor function were 100%, 33.3%, 20% and 100% respectively. The mean FA at lesion level was significantly lower than the corresponding FA at the contralateral hemisphere (P=0.009). In areas caudal to the lesion the same trend yet without statistic significance was observed (P=0.23). There was no significant laterality difference of mean FAs rostral to the level of the lesion. No correlation in LI of FA or ADC in the three anatomic levels with simultaneous and long-term follow up motor function was observed. Restoration of the morphology of the affected CST postoperatively was associated with a trend for decreasing ADC compared to the pre-operative measurements. Intact CST morphology in DTI predicts a favorable postoperative outcome in patients with BSC. Interrupted CSTs and decreased FA-values correlate well within BSC lesion level, nevertheless morphologic characteristics and diffusion parameter changes cannot predict poor prognosis. Caudal and rostral diffusion parameters can provide more information of the integrity of CSTs compared with morphological study alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · World Neurosurgery
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of intravoxel incoherent motion imaging (IVIM) for non-invasive quantification of perfusion and diffusion effects in skeletal muscle at rest and following exercise. After IRB approval, eight healthy volunteers underwent diffusion-weighted MRI of the forearm at 3 T and eight different b values between 0 and 500 s/mm(2) with a temporal resolution of 57 s per dataset. Dynamic images were acquired before and after a standardized handgrip exercise. Diffusion (D) and pseudodiffusion (D*) coefficients as well as the perfusion fraction (FP ) were measured in regions of interest in the flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus (FDS/FDP), brachioradialis, and extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis muscles by using a multi-step bi-exponential analysis in MATLAB. Parametrical maps were calculated voxel-wise. Differences in D, D*, and FP between muscle groups and between time points were calculated using a repeated measures analysis of variance with post hoc Bonferroni tests. Mean values and standard deviations at rest were the following: D*, 28.5 ± 11.4 × 10(-3) mm(2) /s; FP , 0.03 ± 0.01; D, 1.45 ± 0.09 × 10(-3) mm(2) /s. Changes of IVIM parameters were clearly visible on the parametrical maps. In the FDS/FDP, D* increased by 289 ± 236% (p < 0.029), FP by 138 ± 58% (p < 0.01), and D by 17 ± 9% (p < 0.01). A significant increase of IVIM parameters could also be detected in the brachioradialis muscle, which however was significantly lower than in the FDS/FDP. After 20 min, all parameters were still significantly elevated in the FDS/FDP but not in the brachioradialis muscle compared with the resting state. The IVIM approach allows simultaneous quantification of muscle perfusion and diffusion effects at rest and following exercise. It may thus provide a useful alternative to other non-invasive methods such as arterial spin labeling. Possible fields of interest for this technique include perfusion-related muscle diseases, such as peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · NMR in Biomedicine
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To investigate the technical feasibility of whole-body intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging. Materials and Methods Whole-body MR images of eight healthy volunteers were acquired at 3T using a spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with eight b-values. Coronal parametrical whole-body maps of diffusion (D), pseudodiffusion (D*), and the perfusion fraction (Fp) were calculated. Image quality was rated qualitatively by two independent radiologists, and inter-reader reliability was tested with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs). Region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed in the brain, liver, kidney, and erector spinae muscle. Results Depiction of anatomic structures was rated as good on D maps and good to fair on D* and Fp maps. Exemplary mean D (10−3 mm2/s), D* (10−3 mm2/s) and Fp (%) values (± standard deviation) of the renal cortex were as follows: 1.7 ± 0.2; 15.6 ± 6.5; 20.9 ± 4.4. Inter-observer agreement was “substantial” to “almost perfect” (ICC = 0.80 – 0.92). The coefficient of variation of D* was significantly lower with the proposed algorithm compared to the conventional algorithm (p
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · European Radiology
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate metal artifacts induced by biodegradable magnesium-a new class of degradable biomaterial that is beginning to enter the orthopedic routine-on CT and MRI compared to standard titanium and steel controls. Different pins made of titanium, stainless steel, and biodegradable magnesium alloys were scanned using a second-generation dual-energy multidetector CT and a 1.5-T MR scanner. In CT, quantitative assessment of artifacts was performed by two independent readers by measuring the noise in standardized regions of interest close to the pins. In MRI, the artifact diameter was measured. Interobserver agreement was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients. Artifacts were compared using Mann Whitney U tests. In comparison to stainless steel, biodegradable magnesium alloys induced significantly fewer artifacts in both 1.5-T MRI (p = 0.019-0.021) and CT (p = 0.003-0.006). Compared to titanium, magnesium induced significantly less artifact-related noise in CT (p = 0.003-0.008). Although artifacts were less on MRI for biodegradable magnesium compared to titanium, this result was not statistically significant. Biodegradable magnesium alloys induce substantially fewer artifacts in CT compared to standard titanium and stainless steel, and fewer artifacts in MRI for the comparison with stainless steel.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Skeletal Radiology
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) of scaphoid fixation screws. FDCT has gained interest in imaging small anatomic structures of the appendicular skeleton. Angiographic C-arm systems with flat detectors allow fluoroscopy and FDCT imaging in a one-stop procedure emphasizing their role as an ideal intraoperative imaging tool. However, FDCT imaging can be significantly impaired by artefacts induced by fixation screws. Materials and methods Following ethical board approval, commercially available scaphoid fixation screws were inserted into six cadaveric specimens in order to fix artificially induced scaphoid fractures. FDCT images corrected with the algorithm were compared to uncorrected images both quantitatively and qualitatively by two independent radiologists in terms of artefacts, screw contour, fracture line visibility, bone visibility, and soft tissue definition. Normal distribution of variables was evaluated using the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test. In case of normal distribution, quantitative variables were compared using paired Student's t tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for quantitative variables without normal distribution and all qualitative variables. A p value of
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Skeletal Radiology
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To assess the diagnostic performance of quantitative and qualitative image parameters in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for diagnosis of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ). Materials and methods: A BRONJ (22 patients, mean age 70.0 years) group was age and gender matched to a healthy control group (22 patients, mean age 68.0 years). On CBCT images two independent readers performed quantitative bone density value (BDV) measurements with region and volume-of-interest (ROI and VOI) based approaches and qualitative scoring of BRONJ-associated necrosis, sclerosis and periosteal thickening (1 = not present to 5 = definitely present). Intraoperative and clinical findings served as standard of reference. Interreader agreements and diagnostic performance were assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), kappa-statistics and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: Twenty-three regions in 22 patients were affected by BRONJ. ICC values for mean BDV VOI and mean BDV ROI were 0.864 and 0.968, respectively (p < 0.001). The area under the curve (AUC) for mean BDV VOI and mean BDV ROI was 0.58/0.83 with a sensitivity of 57/83% and specificity of 61/77% for diagnosis of BRONJ, respectively. Kappa values for presence of necrosis, sclerosis and periosteal thickening were 0.575, 0.617 and 0.885, respectively. AUC values for qualitative parameters ranged between 0.90-0.96 with sensitivity of 96% and specificities between 79-96% at respective cutoff scores. Conclusions: BRONJ can be effectively diagnosed with CBCT. Qualitative image parameters yield a higher diagnostic performance than quantitative parameters, and ROI-based attenuation measurements were more accurate than VOI-based measurements.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · Skeletal Radiology
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to compare image quality and extent of artifacts from scaphoid fracture fixation screws using different computed tomography (CT) modalities and radiation dose protocols. Imaging of 6 cadaveric wrists with artificial scaphoid fractures and different fixation screws was performed in 2 screw positions (45° and 90° orientation in relation to the x/y-axis) using multidetector CT (MDCT) and 2 flat-panel CT modalities, C-arm flat-panel CT (FPCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT), the latter 2 with low and standard radiation dose protocols. Mean cartilage attenuation and metal artifact-induced absolute Hounsfield unit changes (= artifact extent) were measured. Two independent radiologists evaluated different image quality criteria using a 5-point Likert-scale. Interreader agreements (Cohen κ) were calculated. Mean absolute Hounsfield unit changes and quality ratings were compared using Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Artifact extent was significantly smaller for MDCT and standard-dose FPCT compared with CBCT low- and standard-dose acquisitions (all P < 0.05). No significant differences in artifact extent among different screw types and scanning positions were noted (P > 0.05). Both MDCT and FPCT standard-dose protocols showed equal ratings for screw bone interface, fracture line, and trabecular bone evaluation (P = 0.06, 0.2, and 0.2, respectively) and performed significantly better than FPCT low- and CBCT low- and standard-dose acquisitions (all P < 0.05). Good interreader agreement was found for image quality comparisons (Cohen κ = 0.76-0.78). Both MDCT and FPCT standard-dose acquisition showed comparatively less metal-induced artifacts and better overall image quality compared with FPCT low-dose and both CBCT acquisitions. Flat-panel CT may provide sufficient image quality to serve as a versatile CT alternative for postoperative imaging of internally fixated wrist fractures.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · Investigative radiology
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the value of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) and an iterative frequency split-normalized metal artefact reduction (IFS-MAR) algorithm compared to filtered back projections (FBP) from single-energy CT (SECT) for artefact reduction in internally fixated humeral fractures. Six internally fixated cadaveric humeri were examined using SECT and DECT. Data were reconstructed using FBP, IFS-MAR, and mono-energetic DECT extrapolations. Image analysis included radiodensity values and qualitative evaluation of artefacts, image quality, and level of confidence for localizing screw tips. Radiodensity values of streak artefacts were significantly different (p < 0.05) between FBP (-104 ± 222) and IFS-MAR (73 ± 122), and between FBP and DECT (32 ± 151), without differences between IFS-MAR and DECT (p < 0.553). Compared to FBP, qualitative artefacts were significantly reduced using IFS-MAR (p < 0.001) and DECT (p < 0.05), without significant differences between IFS-MAR and DECT (p < 0.219). Image quality significantly (p = 0.016) improved for IFS-MAR and DECT compared to FBP, without significant differences between IFS-MAR and DECT (p < 0.553). The level of confidence for screw tip localization was assessed as best for DECT in all cases. Both IFS-MAR in SECT and mono-energetic DECT produce improved image quality and a reduction of metal artefacts. Screw tip positions can be most confidently assessed using DECT.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014 · Clinical Radiology
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to compare lower limb length and alignment measurements on supine CT, upright full-length radiography, and 3D models based on upright biplanar linear radiography. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. This study involved 51 consecutive patients (22 men and 29 women; mean age, 68.8 years; range, 43-92 years) who were scheduled for total knee replacement. Lower limb length and alignment angle were measured on CT, upright full-length radiography, and 3D models based on biplanar linear radiography with standard and composed leg methods by two independent readers. Descriptive statistics of each modality were calculated. Measurements of different modalities were compared by paired Student t tests. Agreement between readers and modalities was assessed by Bland-Altman analyses. RESULTS. Mean (± SD) limb lengths were 783 ± 56.1 mm (range, 639-927 mm), 785 ± 53.0 mm (range, 655-924 mm), 780 ± 55.4 mm (range, 633-921 mm), and 783 ± 55.9 mm (range, 636-924 mm) for CT, upright full-length radiography, and 3D models based on biplanar linear radiography standard and composed leg measurements, respectively. Mean alignment angles were 2.3° ± 5.5° (range, -12° to 20°) for CT, 2.5° ± 6.7° (range, -17° to 18°) for upright full-length radiography, and 3.4° ± 6.6° (range, -14° to 18°) for 3D models based on biplanar linear radiography. No significant differences among modalities for mean limb length were found when using composed leg measurements in biplanar linear radiography. Very small but significant mean differences in angle measurements were seen for CT (-1.1° ± 2.5) and upright full-length radiography (-0.9° ± 3.1) compared with biplanar linear radiography. Bland-Altman analyses showed no significant differences between readers, with the highest agreement for biplanar linear radiography length measurements. CONCLUSION. Measurements on 3D models based on upright biplanar linear radiographs allow lower limb length and alignment angle measurements that are interchangeable with supine CT scans and upright full-length radiographs but with superior interreader agreement.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014 · American Journal of Roentgenology
  • R Goetti · G Warnock · F P Kuhn · R Guggenberger · Ruth O'Gorman · A Buck · N Khan · I Scheer
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:Cerebral perfusion assessment is important in the preoperative evaluation and postoperative follow-up of patients with Moyamoya disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation of quantitative CBF measurements performed with arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging and H2[(15)O]-PET in children and young adults with Moyamoya disease.MATERIALS AND METHODS:Thirteen children and young adults (8 female patients; age, 9.7 ± 7.1 years; range, 1-23 years) with Moyamoya disease underwent cerebral perfusion imaging with H2[(15)O]-PET (Discovery STE PET/CT, 3D Fourier rebinning filtered back-projection, 128 × 128 × 47 matrix, 2.34 × 2.34 × 3.27 mm(3) voxel spacing) and arterial spin-labeling (3T scanner, 3D pulsed continuous arterial spin-labeling sequence, 32 axial sections, TR = 5.5 seconds, TE = 25 ms, FOV = 24 cm, 128 × 128 matrix, 1.875 × 1.875 × 5 mm(3) voxel spacing) within less than 2 weeks of each other. Perfusion of left and right anterior cerebral artery, MCA, and posterior cerebral artery territories was qualitatively assessed for arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging and H2[(15)O]-PET by 2 independent readers by use of a 3-point-Likert scale. Quantitative correlation of relative CBF with cerebellar normalization between arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging and H2[(15)O]-PET was evaluated in a volume-based approach for each vascular territory after 3D image coregistration.RESULTS:Interreader agreement was good (κ = 0.67-0.69), and strong and significant correlations were found between arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging and H2[(15)O]-PET for both qualitative perfusion scoring (ρ = 0.77; P < .001) and quantitative perfusion assessment of relative CBF with cerebellar normalization (r = 0.67, P < .001).CONCLUSIONS:In children and young adults with Moyamoya disease, quantitative evaluation of CBF is possible with the use of arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging without ionizing radiation or contrast injection with a good correlation to H2[(15)O]-PET after cerebellar normalization.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014
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    R Goetti · G Warnock · F P Kuhn · R Guggenberger · R O'Gorman · A Buck · N Khan · I Scheer
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    ABSTRACT: Background and purpose: Cerebral perfusion assessment is important in the preoperative evaluation and postoperative follow-up of patients with Moyamoya disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation of quantitative CBF measurements performed with arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging and H2[(15)O]-PET in children and young adults with Moyamoya disease. Materials and methods: Thirteen children and young adults (8 female patients; age, 9.7 ± 7.1 years; range, 1-23 years) with Moyamoya disease underwent cerebral perfusion imaging with H2[(15)O]-PET (Discovery STE PET/CT, 3D Fourier rebinning filtered back-projection, 128 × 128 × 47 matrix, 2.34 × 2.34 × 3.27 mm(3) voxel spacing) and arterial spin-labeling (3T scanner, 3D pulsed continuous arterial spin-labeling sequence, 32 axial sections, TR = 5.5 seconds, TE = 25 ms, FOV = 24 cm, 128 × 128 matrix, 1.875 × 1.875 × 5 mm(3) voxel spacing) within less than 2 weeks of each other. Perfusion of left and right anterior cerebral artery, MCA, and posterior cerebral artery territories was qualitatively assessed for arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging and H2[(15)O]-PET by 2 independent readers by use of a 3-point-Likert scale. Quantitative correlation of relative CBF with cerebellar normalization between arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging and H2[(15)O]-PET was evaluated in a volume-based approach for each vascular territory after 3D image coregistration. Results: Interreader agreement was good (κ = 0.67-0.69), and strong and significant correlations were found between arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging and H2[(15)O]-PET for both qualitative perfusion scoring (ρ = 0.77; P < .001) and quantitative perfusion assessment of relative CBF with cerebellar normalization (r = 0.67, P < .001). Conclusions: In children and young adults with Moyamoya disease, quantitative evaluation of CBF is possible with the use of arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging without ionizing radiation or contrast injection with a good correlation to H2[(15)O]-PET after cerebellar normalization.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · American Journal of Neuroradiology
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE To assess the value of monoenergetic extrapolations from dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) and standard filtered back projections (FBP) from single-energy computed tomography (SECT) compared to a new iterative frequency split-normalized (IFS) metal artifact reconstruction (MAR) algorithm for artifact reduction in internally fixated humeral fractures. METHOD AND MATERIALS In this cadaveric study, artifacts in seven internally fixated human proximal humeral fractures of five subjects were examined with SECT and DECT. Postprocessing included routinely used FBP algorithm, a new IFS-MAR algorithm, and monoenergetic extrapolation of DECT images. Image analysis included quantitative assessment of image artifacts (HU measurements) as well as evaluation of image quality and osteosynthesis material and visualization of screw position in FBP, IFS-MAR, and DECT using a five-point Likert scale. RESULTS HU values of streak artifacts were significantly (P < .05) different between FBP (115.7±222.4) and IFS-MAR (68.7±106.3), and between FBP and monoenergetic DECT (10.1±146.1). Between IFS-MAR and DECT no significant differences were detected (P = .30). Artifact scores improved significantly from FBP (3.9) to IFS-MAR (2.0; P < .001) and DECT (2.6; P < .05), whereas no significant differences were seen between IFS-MAR and DECT (P = .10). Visualization scores of osteosynthesis material differed significantly (P < .05) between FBP (2.9) and IFS-MAR (2.3) and between IFS-MAR and DECT (1.4). Screw position of 57/57 screws was identically rated in FBP and IFS-MAR, but different between IFS-MAR and DECT in 11 cases, with a subjectively better visualization in DECT. CONCLUSION IFS-MAR algorithm in SECT as well as monoenergetic extrapolations from DECT allow for an improved image quality, a reduction of artifacts and better assessment of screw-position compared to standard FBP in SECT. CLINICAL RELEVANCE/APPLICATION Both, dual-energy CT and a newly applied iterative frequency split-normalized metal artifact reconstruction algorithm for CT are promising techniques for metal artifact reduction in internally fixated
    No preview · Conference Paper · Dec 2013

Publication Stats

280 Citations
116.50 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010-2015
    • University of Zurich
      • • Department of Pediatric Orthopaedics
      • • Center for Integrative Human Physiology
      Zürich, Zurich, Switzerland