Diane V Havlir

University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States

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Publications (244)2443.8 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Evidence favoring earlier HIV ART initiation at high CD4+ T-cell counts (CD4>350/uL) has grown, and guidelines now recommend earlier HIV treatment. However, the cost of providing ART to individuals with CD4>350 in Sub-Saharan Africa has not been well estimated. This remains a major barrier to optimal global cost projections for accelerating the scale-up of ART. Our objective was to compute costs of ART delivery to high CD4+count individuals in a typical rural Ugandan health center-based HIV clinic, and use these data to construct scenarios of efficient ART scale-up.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Food insecurity is associated with poor virologic outcomes, but this has not been studied during pregnancy and breastfeeding. We assessed sustained viral suppression from 8 weeks on ART to 48 weeks postpartum among 171 pregnant and breastfeeding Ugandan women; 74.9% experienced food insufficiency (FI). In multivariable analysis, FI (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.16-0.91), higher pretreatment HIV-1 RNA (aOR 0.55 per 10-fold increase, 95% CI 0.37-0.82), and lopinavir/ritonavir versus efavirenz (aOR 0.49, 95% CI 0.24-0.96) were associated with lower odds of sustained viral suppression. Interventions to address food security may improve virologic outcomes among HIV-infected women.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of the International AIDS Society

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of the International AIDS Society
  • Diane Havlir · Monica Gandhi
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    ABSTRACT: Long-acting injectable antiretroviral therapy (ART) formulations hold great promise in helping to close the significant gap between efficacy and effectiveness in HIV treatment by eliminating the requirement for lifelong daily pills. However, significant systems-level and individual challenges to implementation of long-acting ART in HIV treatment are anticipated. Studies of long-acting ART formulations are burgeoning, but the drugs are still in early phases of investigation and key knowledge gaps in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as their effectiveness in settings with the largest burden of HIV disease and in key populations, remain. Extrapolating from the literature on implementation barriers to using long-acting contraception on a global scale, we explore the implementation barriers to rolling-out long-acting ART, including country approval and endorsements; prioritization of patient populations for preferred use, clinic infrastructure requirements, steady supply chains, decentralization of care, provider and patient training programs, and laboratory monitoring; and the need to examine patient preferences and conduct rigorous implementation science research to effectively scale-up this intervention. Long-acting ART for HIV treatment harbors exciting potential to shift treatment paradigms. Current knowledge gaps in the use of these agents remain, leading to multiple anticipated systems-level and individual-level barriers to implementation. Addressing these gaps and barriers will help fulfill the promise of these agents against the pandemic.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Current opinion in HIV and AIDS
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    ABSTRACT: Hair concentrations are a noninvasive measure of cumulative antiretroviral exposure and the strongest predictor of viral suppression in large cohorts of nonpregnant patients. We examined hair concentrations of antiretrovirals in relation to virologic outcomes in pregnant and breastfeeding women for the first time. The Prevention of Malaria and HIV Disease in Tororo trial (NCT00993031) enrolled HIV-infected pregnant Ugandan women at 12-28 weeks gestation who were randomized to lopinavir or efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy (ART). Small hair samples were collected at 30-34 weeks gestation and 10-25 weeks postpartum. Efavirenz and lopinavir hair concentrations were measured via liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Multivariate logistic regression models examined predictors of viral suppression (HIV-1 RNA ≤400 copies/ml) at delivery and 24 weeks postpartum. Among 325 women, median CD4 cell count was 366 cells/μl (interquartile range 270-488) at ART initiation. Mean self-reported 3-day adherence was greater than 97% in each arm. Viral suppression was achieved by 98.0% (efavirenz) and 87.4% (lopinavir) at delivery. At 24 weeks postpartum, 92.5% (efavirenz) and 90.6% (lopinavir) achieved viral suppression; 88% of women were breastfeeding. In multivariate models including self-reported adherence and pretreatment HIV-1 RNA, antiretroviral hair concentrations were the strongest predictor of viral suppression at delivery [efavirenz: adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.86 per doubling in concentration, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-3.1, P = 0.013; lopinavir: aOR 1.90, 95% CI 1.33-2.7, P = 0.0004] and 24 weeks postpartum (efavirenz: aOR 1.81, 95% CI 1.22-2.7, P = 0.003; lopinavir: aOR 1.53, 95% CI 1.05-2.2, P = 0.026). Antiretroviral hair concentrations represent an innovative tool that strongly predicts viral suppression among HIV-infected childbearing women during the critical periods of delivery and breastfeeding.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · AIDS
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    ABSTRACT: Gastrointestinal T lymphocytes are critical for mucosal immunity and HIV pathogenesis, yet little is known about normal T cell numbers and phenotypes in different regions of the gut, or the degree to which ART can restore levels to those of HIV-uninfected individuals. To investigate these questions, we measured T cell frequencies and markers of memory, activation, anergy, and homing in the blood, ileum, and rectum of HIV- and ART-suppressed HIV+ adults. In HIV- individuals, T cell frequencies and phenotypes differed significantly between sites. Compared to HIV- adults, HIV+ adults had lower absolute CD4+T cell counts in the ileal lamina propria and lower relative CD4+T cell counts in the blood and ileum. In the gut, HIV+ adults had a higher proportion of CD38+ CD4+T cells, a lower proportion of terminally-differentiated effector cells, and, in the rectum, a higher proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells. In HIV+ individuals, relative CD4+T cell numbers in the ileum correlated with the proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells, whereas in the rectum, they tended to correlate with the proportion of circulating CD4+T cells expressing α4β7 or CCR6. Mechanisms of T cell reconstitution may differ throughout the gut, with homing contributing more in the rectum while ileal reconstitution is associated with mucosal CD4+T cell anergy.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Changing treatment practices may be selecting for changes in the drug sensitivity of malaria parasites. We characterized ex vivo drug sensitivity and parasite polymorphisms associated with sensitivity in 459 Plasmodium falciparum samples obtained from subjects enrolled in two clinical trials in Tororo, Uganda, from 2010 to 2013. Sensitivities to chloroquine and monodesethylamodiaquine varied widely; sensitivities to quinine, dihydroartemisinin, lumefantrine, and piperaquine were generally good. Associations between ex vivo drug sensitivity and parasite polymorphisms included decreased chloroquine and monodesethylamodiaquine sensitivity and increased lumefantrine and piperaquine sensitivity with pfcrt 76T, as well as increased lumefantrine sensitivity with pfmdr1 86Y, Y184, and 1246Y. Over time, ex vivo sensitivity decreased for lumefantrine and piperaquine and increased for chloroquine, the prevalences of pfcrt K76 and pfmdr1 N86 and D1246 increased, and the prevalences of pfdhfr and pfdhps polymorphisms associated with antifolate resistance were unchanged. In recurrent infections, recent prior treatment with artemether-lumefantrine was associated with decreased ex vivo lumefantrine sensitivity and increased prevalence of pfcrt K76 and pfmdr1 N86, 184F, and D1246. In children assigned chemoprevention with monthly dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine with documented circulating piperaquine, breakthrough infections had increased the prevalence of pfmdr1 86Y and 1246Y compared to untreated controls. The noted impacts of therapy and chemoprevention on parasite polymorphisms remained significant in multivariate analysis correcting for calendar time. Overall, changes in parasite sensitivity were consistent with altered selective pressures due to changing treatment practices in Uganda. These changes may threaten the antimalarial treatment and preventive efficacies of artemether-lumefantrine and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, respectively.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
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    Diane V Havlir · Judith S Currier
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    ABSTRACT: Noncommunicable diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, renal and bone disease, and malignancies are an ongoing concern during the course of treated HIV disease. Research in this area continues to focus on the epidemiology and risk factors associated with these conditions, identifying the contributions of HIV-related immunopathology to specific and collective end-organ diseases, and evaluating interventions to prevent or reduce the morbidity associated with these conditions. Infectious complications of HIV, such as tuberculosis and cryptococcal disease, also continue to cause substantial morbidity and mortality; diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of these is an area of focus. The 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections provided new insights into all of these areas.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Topics in HIV medicine: a publication of the International AIDS Society, USA
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    ABSTRACT: Malnutrition may impact the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of antiretroviral medications and virologic responses in HIV-infected children. The authors therefore evaluated the PK of nevirapine (NVP), efavirenz (EFV) and lopinavir (LPV) in associations with nutritional status in a cohort of HIV-infected Ugandan children. Sparse dried blood spot samples from Ugandan children were used to estimate plasma concentrations. Historical PK data from children from 3 resource-rich countries (RRC) were utilized to develop the PK models. Concentrations in 330 dried blood spot from 163 Ugandan children aged 0.7-7 years were analyzed in reference to plasma PK data (1189 samples) from 204 children from RRC aged 0.5-12 years. Among Ugandan children, 48% was malnourished (underweight, thin or stunted). Compared to RRC, Ugandan children exhibited reduced bioavailability of EFV and LPV; 11% (P = 0.045) and 18% (P = 0.008), respectively. In contrast, NVP bioavailability was 46% higher in Ugandan children (P < 0.001) with a trend toward greater bioavailability when malnourished. Children receiving LPV, EFV or NVP had comparable risk of virologic failure. Among children on NVP, low height and weight for age Z scores were associated with reduced risk of virologic failure (P = 0.034, P = 0.068, respectively). Ugandan children demonstrated lower EFV and LPV and higher NVP exposure compared to children in RRC, perhaps reflecting the consequence of malnutrition on bioavailability. In children receiving NVP, the relation between exposure, malnutrition and outcome turned out to be marginally significant. Further investigations are warranted using more intensive PK measurements and adequate adherence assessments, to further assess causes of virologic failure in Ugandan children.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
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    ABSTRACT: In STRIDE, slow metabolizer CYP2B6 and NAT2 genotypes were each associated with increased plasma efavirenz concentrations during anti-tuberculosis therapy. Concentrations were greater on therapy than off therapy in 58% with CYP2B6 and 93% with NAT2 slow metabolizer genotypes. Individuals with slow metabolizer genotypes in both genes had markedly elevated concentrations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Clinical Infectious Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives Targeting high TB transmission sites may offer a novel approach to TB prevention in sub-Saharan Africa. We sought to characterize TB transmission sites in a rural Ugandan township.Methods We recruited adults starting TB treatment in Tororo, Uganda over one year. 54 TB cases provided names of frequent contacts, sites of residence, health care, work and social activities, and two sputum samples. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) culture-positive specimens underwent spoligotyping to identify strains with shared genotypes. We visualized TB case social networks, and obtained, mapped and geo-coded global positioning system measures for every location that cases reported frequenting one month before treatment. Locations of spatial overlap among genotype-clustered cases were considered potential transmission sites.ResultsSix distinct genotypic clusters were identified involving 21/33(64%) MTB culture-positive, genotyped cases; none shared a home. Although 18/54(33%) TB cases shared social network ties, none of the genotype-clustered cases shared social ties. Using spatial analysis, we identified potential sites of within-cluster TB transmission for five of six genotypic clusters. All sites but one were health care and social venues, including sites of drinking, worship and marketplaces. Cases reported spending the largest proportion of pre-treatment person-time (22.4%) at drinking venues.Conclusions Using molecular epidemiology, geospatial and social network data from adult TB cases identified at clinics, we quantified person-time spent at high-risk locations across a rural Ugandan community, and determined the most likely sites of recent TB transmission to be health care and social venues. These sites may not have been identified using contact investigation alone.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Tropical Medicine & International Health
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    ABSTRACT: Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is now the global standard for HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding women at all CD4 cell counts. We compared the efficacy and safety of an efavirenz versus lopinavir/ritonavir regimen for HIV-infected pregnant women initiating ART in rural Uganda. Randomized clinical trial. We performed a planned secondary analysis comparing viral load suppression (HIV-1 RNA ≤400 copies/ml), safety, and HIV transmission to infants in a trial designed to test the hypothesis that lopinavir/ritonavir versus efavirenz-based ART would reduces placental malaria (PROMOTE, ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00993031). HIV-infected, ART-naïve pregnant women at 12-28 weeks gestation and any CD4 cell count were randomized. ART was provided and participants were counseled to breastfeed for 1 year postpartum. The median age of the 389 study participants was 29 years; median CD4 cell count was 370 cells/μl. At delivery, virologic suppression was 97.6% in the efavirenz arm and 86.0% in the lopinavir/ritonavir arm (P < 0.001). At 48 weeks postpartum, 91.0% of women on efavirenz and 88.4% on lopinavir/ritonavir had viral suppression (P = 0.49). Grade 1 or 2 gastrointestinal adverse events were higher among women on lopinavir/ritonavir versus efavirenz. Only two infants acquired HIV (both in the lopinavir/ritonavir arm), and HIV-free infant survival was similar between study arms: 92.9% (lopinavir/ritonavir) versus 97.2% (efavirenz) (P = 0.10). Virologic suppression at delivery was higher with an efavirenz versus lopinavir/ritonavir-based regimen. However, women in both arms achieved high levels of virologic suppression through 1 year postpartum and the risk of transmission to infants was low.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · AIDS (London, England)
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated the acceptability and use of macronutrient supplementation among HIV-infected pregnant Ugandan women receiving antiretroviral therapy in a clinical study (NCT 00993031). We first conducted formative research among 56 pregnant and lactating women to select a supplement regimen. Acceptability and use of the supplementation regimen (35 sachets of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) and 4 or 6 kg of instant soy porridge for the household provided monthly) were evaluated among 87 pregnant women. Organoleptic assessments of LNS were favorable. Participants reported consuming LNS a mean of 6.1 days per week, and adherence to recommended consumption behaviors (e.g. frequency, quantity, not sharing) was >80 %. Few women reported negative social consequences of supplementation. The majority of participants also consumed most of the porridge intended for the household. In sum, LNS was acceptable and used regularly. Larger studies to evaluate physical and psychosocial consequences of LNS during pregnancy among HIV-infected women are warranted.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · AIDS and Behavior
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis is recommended for HIV-exposed infants until breastfeeding ends and HIV infection has been excluded. Extending prophylaxis with a focus on preventing malaria may be beneficial in high transmission areas. We investigated three regimens for the prevention of malaria in young HIV-exposed children. Design: An open-label, randomized controlled trial. Setting: Tororo, Uganda, a rural area with intense, year-round, malaria transmission. Participants: Two hundred infants aged 4–5 months enrolled and 186 randomized after cessation of breastfeeding and confirmed to be HIV uninfected (median 10 months of age). Intervention: No chemoprevention, monthly sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, daily trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or monthly dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine given from randomization to 24 months of age. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was the incidence of malaria during the intervention period. Secondary outcomes included the incidence of hospitalization, diarrhoeal illness, or respiratory tract infection; prevalence of anaemia and asymptomatic parasitemia; measures of safety; and incidence of malaria over 1 year after the intervention was stopped. Results: During the intervention, the incidence of malaria in the no chemoprevention group was 6.28 episodes per person-year at risk. Protective efficacy was 69% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 53–80, P < 0.001] for dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, 49% (95% CI 23–66, P = 0.001) for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and 9% for sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (95% CI −35 to 38, P = 0.65). There were no significant differences in any secondary outcomes, with the exception of a lower prevalence of asymptomatic parasitemia in the dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine arm. Conclusion: Monthly chemoprevention with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine was well tolerated and associated with a significant reduction in malaria in young HIV-exposed children.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · AIDS
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    ABSTRACT: BackgroundImproving childhood tuberculosis (TB) evaluation and care is a global priority, but data on performance at community health centers in TB endemic regions are sparse.ObjectiveTo describe the current practices and quality of TB evaluation for children with cough ≥2 weeks' duration presenting to community health centers in Uganda.MethodsCross-sectional analysis of children (<15 years) receiving care at five Level IV community health centers in rural Uganda for any reason between 2009–2012. Quality of TB care was assessed using indicators derived from the International Standards of Tuberculosis Care (ISTC).ResultsFrom 2009–2012, 1713 of 187,601 (0.9%, 95% CI: 0.4–1.4%) children presenting to community health centers had cough ≥ 2 weeks' duration. Of those children, only 299 (17.5%, 95% CI: 15.7–19.3%) were referred for sputum microscopy, but 251 (84%, 95% CI: 79.8–88.1%) completed sputum examination if referred. The yield of sputum microscopy was only 3.6% (95% CI: 1.3–5.9%), and only 55.6% (95% CI: 21.2–86.3%) of children with acid-fast bacilli positive sputum were started on treatment. Children under age 5 were less likely to be referred for sputum examination and to receive care in accordance with ISTC. The proportion of children evaluated in accordance with ISTC increased over time (4.6% in 2009 to 27.9% in 2012, p = 0.03), though this did not result in increased case-detection.ConclusionThe quality of TB evaluation was poor for children with cough ≥2 weeks' duration presenting for health care. Referrals for sputum smear microscopy and linkage to TB treatment were key gaps in the TB evaluation process, especially for children under the age of five.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: The emergence of resistance to artemisinin derivatives in Southeast Asia, manifested as delayed clearance of Plasmodium falciparum following treatment with artemisinins, is a major concern. Recently, the artemisinin resistance phenotype was attributed to mutations in portions of a P. falciparum gene (PF3D7_1343700) encoding kelch (K13) propeller domains, providing a molecular marker to monitor the spread of resistance. The P. falciparum cysteine protease falcipain-2 (FP2; PF3D7_1115700) has been shown to contribute to artemisinin action, as hemoglobin degradation is required for potent drug activity, and a stop mutation in the FP2 gene was identified in parasites selected for artemisinin resistance. Although delayed parasite clearance after artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has not yet been noted in Uganda and ACTs remain highly efficacious, characterizing the diversity of these genes is important to assess the potential for resistance selection and to provide a baseline for future surveillance. We therefore sequenced the K13-propeller domain and FP2 gene in P. falciparum isolates from children previously treated with ACT in Uganda, including samples from 2006-7 (n = 49) and from 2010-12 (n = 175). Using 3D7 as the reference genome, we identified 5 non-synonymous polymorphisms in the K13-propeller domain (133 isolates) and 35 in FP2 (160 isolates); these did not include the polymorphisms recently associated with resistance after in vitro selection or identified in isolates from Asia. The prevalence of K13-propeller and FP2 polymorphisms did not increase over time, and was not associated with either time since prior receipt of an ACT or the persistence of parasites ≥2 days following treatment with an ACT. Thus, the K13-propeller and FP2 polymorphisms associated with artemisinin resistance are not prevalent in Uganda, and we did not see evidence for selection of polymorphisms in these genes.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-exposed uninfected children (HEU) have an increased risk of morbidity and mortality compared with HIV-unexposed uninfected children (HUU); however, prior studies have not fully accounted for the role of both breastfeeding and age on this association. In this cohort of HEU and HUU in Uganda, non-breastfeeding HEU, from 6–11 months compared with non-breastfeeding HUU had a higher risk of hospitalizations [relative risk (RR): 10.1, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.70–27.6], severe febrile illness (RR: 3.84, 95% CI: 2.06–7.17), severe diarrhea (RR: 6.37, 95% CI: 2.32–17.4) and severe malnutrition (RR: 18.4, 95% CI: 4.68–72.0). There were no differences between morbidity outcomes between breastfeeding HEU and HUU children, aged 6–11 months. In the 12–24 month age group, the only difference in morbidity outcomes among non-breast feeding children was an increased risk of severe malnutrition for HEU. These data suggest that the increased risk of morbidity among HEU aged 6–11 years is partially explained by early cessation of breastfeeding.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Journal of Tropical Pediatrics
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Chemoprevention offers a promising strategy for prevention of malaria in African children. However, the optimal chemoprevention drug and dosing strategy is unclear in areas of year-round transmission and resistance to many antimalarial drugs. To compare three available regimens, we conducted an open-label randomized controlled trial of chemoprevention in Ugandan children. Methods and findings: This study was conducted between June 28, 2010, and September 25, 2013. 400 infants were enrolled and 393 randomized at 6 mo of age to no chemoprevention, monthly sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), daily trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TS), or monthly dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP). Study drugs were administered at home without supervision. Piperaquine (PQ) levels were used as a measure of compliance in the DP arm. Participants were given insecticide-treated bednets, and caregivers were encouraged to bring their child to a study clinic whenever they were ill. Chemoprevention was stopped at 24 mo of age, and participants followed-up an additional year. Primary outcome was the incidence of malaria during the intervention period. During the intervention, the incidence of malaria in the no chemoprevention arm was 6.95 episodes per person-year at risk. Protective efficacy was 58% (95% CI, 45%-67%, p<0.001) for DP, 28% (95% CI, 7%-44%, p = 0.01) for TS, and 7% for SP (95% CI, -19% to 28%, p = 0.57). PQ levels were below the detection limit 52% of the time when malaria was diagnosed in the DP arm, suggesting non-adherence. There were no differences between the study arms in the incidence of serious adverse events during the intervention and the incidence of malaria during the 1-y period after the intervention was stopped. Conclusions: For preventing malaria in children living in an area of high transmission intensity, monthly DP was the most efficacious and safe, although adherence may pose a problem. Monthly SP and daily TS may not be appropriate in areas with high transmission intensity and frequent resistance to antifolates. Trial registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00948896 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · PLoS Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been associated with preterm birth in some studies. We examined risk factors for preterm birth among women randomized to lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r)- or efavirenz (EFV)-based ART. Methods: This was a planned secondary analysis of the PROMOTE-Pregnant Women and Infants Study, an open-label, randomized controlled trial comparing the risk of placental malaria among HIV-infected, ART-naive pregnant Ugandan women assigned to initiate LPV/r- or EFV-based ART at 12-28 weeks gestation. Gestational age was determined based on last menstrual period and ultrasound biometry. All women received bednets and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Stillbirths, spontaneous abortions, and multiple gestations were excluded from the primary analysis. Potential risk factors for preterm birth (<37 weeks gestation) were evaluated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: Three hundred fifty-six women were included in this analysis. At enrollment, median gestational age was 21 weeks and median CD4 cell count was 368 cells per cubic millimeter. 14.7% of deliveries in the EFV arm and 16.2% in the LPV/r arm were preterm. Preterm birth was associated with gestational weight gain below 0.1 kg/week versus 0.1 kg/week or more [odds ratio (OR) = 2.49; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38 to 4.47; P = 0.003]. Neither ART regimen of LPV/r versus EFV (OR = 1.12; 95% CI: 0.63 to 2.00; P = 0.69) nor placental malaria (OR = 0.74; 95% CI: 0.38 to 1.44; P = 0.37) was associated with preterm birth. Conclusions: LPV/r was not associated with an increased risk of preterm birth compared with EFV. However, interventions are needed to address modifiable risk factors for preterm birth, such as nutritional status (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00993031).
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes

Publication Stats

18k Citations
2,443.80 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006-2015
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • • Division of HIV/AIDS
      • • Division of Hospital Medicine
      • • Department of Medicine
      San Francisco, California, United States
    • National Institute for Research in Tuberculosis
      Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
  • 2014
    • Makerere University
      • School of Medicine
      Kampala, Central Region, Uganda
  • 2009-2013
    • CSU Mentor
      Long Beach, California, United States
  • 2010
    • Mulago Hospital
      Kampala, Central Region, Uganda
  • 1991-2009
    • University of California, San Diego
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Division of Infectious Diseases
      San Diego, California, United States
    • Case Western Reserve University
      • School of Medicine
      Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • 2008
    • Makerere University Business School
      Kampala, Central Region, Uganda
  • 2005
    • Howard Hughes Medical Institute
      Ashburn, Virginia, United States
    • Columbia University
      New York, New York, United States
  • 2003
    • San Francisco VA Medical Center
      San Francisco, California, United States
  • 2002
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
      Birmingham, Alabama, United States
    • Harvard University
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1989-2001
    • Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
      • Department of Medicine
      Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • 2000
    • National University (California)
      San Diego, California, United States
    • University of Ioannina
      Yannina, Epirus, Greece
  • 1993
    • Naval Medical Center San Diego
      • Infectious Diseases Clinic
      San Diego, California, United States