Junaid Alam Ansari

Aga Khan University, Pakistan, Kurrachee, Sindh, Pakistan

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Publications (5)5.74 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Following percutaneous intervention (PCI), restenosis, progression of disease and multi-vessel involvement may require further intervention in the form of surgical revascularization. Patients with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) done after PCI were evaluated to find out the reason for the need of surgical revascularization. Over a period of 12 months, 610 patients underwent CABG. Out of them, 34 patients had previous PCI/stenting. Coronary risk factors including hypertension in 85%, diabetes mellitus in 60%, dyslipidemia in 60%, tobacco use in 50% and a positive family history was present in 53% of the patients. All patients were symptomatic. Multi-vessel disease was present in 67% and single vessel in 4.7%. The extent of disease and stenosis of stents were responsible for reintervention. Careful selection of patients is required in presence of multiple risk factors for coronary artery disease to provide maximum benefit by either PCI or CABG.
    Full-text · Article · May 2012
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate outcomes of re-operative coronary artery surgery in a tertiary care hospital in a developing country. Preoperative, intra-operative and postoperative variables were analyzed in 82 consecutive patients who underwent re-operative coronary surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass. The mean age was 63.3 +/- 7.7 years, 91.2% were male and 9.8% female. Coronary artery disease risk factors were present in more than 50% of the patients. History of preoperative myocardial infarction was positive in 56% patients. There was strong clinical and angiographic indication for surgery with unstable angina in 50% patients and > 80% had multivessel disease. Only 5% patients were in functional class I. The risk stratification showed a mean Euro score of 8. The IABP was used in 20% patients. A mean of 3.1 grafts per patient were applied. The median cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and aortic cross clamp time was 144 minutes respectively. Postoperative mortality was 7.3%. Short-term follow up revealed 74% of the patients in NYHA functional class I. Reoperative coronary artery bypass grafting is challenging but with expertise, team effort can be performed with good functional outcome.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2011 · Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association
  • M.Z. Khan · S. Perveen · J.A. Ansari · S.A. Sami · S. Furnaz · S.H. Fatimi
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Impaired ventricular function is a known risk factor for mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting however increasingly more patients with impaired ventricular function are referred for surgery. Currently no large data is available from Pakistan regarding this aspect of coronary surgery. Our objectives were to find out the hospital mortality and mid term functional improvement in patients with impaired ventricular function undergoing coronary artery by pass grafting and identify the risk factors for mortality. Methodology: Retrospective analysis of preoperative, operative and postoperative variables of patients with impaired ventricular function who were operated for isolated first time coronary artery bypass between October 2006 to April 2009. Results: Total 190 patients with impaired ventricular function underwent isolated first time coronary artery bypass grafting during this period with a male predominance (82.6%). Mean ejection fraction of the group was 25.4±5.3%. Mean predicted mortality on logistic Euro score was 10.9±2.7%. Actual in hospital mortality of the group was 4.7% which is comparable to contemporary published results. Multivariate analysis identified use of intra aortic balloon pump, non use of internal mammary artery and preoperative NYHA functional class as factors associated with mortality. Conclusion: Coronary artery bypass grafting can be performed in patients with impaired ventricular function with acceptable hospital mortality and mid term functional improvement.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2009
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    ABSTRACT: Life expectancy has increased during recent decades leading to a growing number of older population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in octogenarians and to compare the outcomes of the emergent CABG with elective surgery. Prospectively collected data from 31 consecutive octogenarian patients who underwent CABG between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2008 were analyzed. Main outcomes of interest included mortality, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, priority of surgery, postoperative complications and functional status on follow-up. Fifteen patients were operated on an urgent basis. Patients operated on an urgent basis were in NYHA class III or IV preoperatively (P=0.0016). There were no significant differences in operative and postoperative variables. There were three in-hospital deaths and 23 patients (82%) were alive on follow-up and 19 were in functional class I or II. Quality of life assessment was performed using Seattle Angina Questionnaire and patients reported remarkable improvement in quality of life. Overall, 90% patients were not or slightly disabled in their daily activity. Satisfaction with their current quality of life was reported by 95% of patients. CABG may be performed in octogenarians with remarkable outcomes and improvement in quality of life.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2009 · Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2008 · The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery