D Burrini

Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Bruxelles, Brussels Capital, Belgium

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Publications (4)13.09 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A 34-year-old pregnant woman developed a myelodysplastic syndrome during pregnancy which resulted in a refractory anaemia and an extreme thrombocytopenia. The report describes the anaesthetic management of elective caesarean section and successful childbirth in this patient. Following replacement therapy with packed red cells and platelets, general anaesthesia was used for the procedure.
    No preview · Article · Nov 1997 · International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia
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    L De Catte · D Burrini · C Mares · T Waterschoot
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    ABSTRACT: In this study we examined the value of Doppler flow measurements of the umbilical artery in distinguishing normal fetuses from those with single umbilical artery, and studied the Doppler flow differences and the compensatory arterial dilatation in appropriate (AGA) and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) fetuses with single umbilical artery. The Doppler flow indices (pulsatility index, S/D ratio) and the arterial diameters were prospectively and serially measured in 26 and 15 fetuses with single umbilical artery and without congenital malformations, respectively. Longitudinal changes in Doppler flow indices in normal and SGA fetuses with single umbilical artery are comparable, and are within normal reference ranges for three-vessel cords; there is a fairly constant widening of the single umbilical artery throughout gestation and a mean increase in size of about 1 mm over that found in normal cords from 20 weeks onward. In fetuses with single umbilical artery at mid-gestation, an umbilical artery diameter of more than 4 mm occurred in only 5/15 cases and is therefore not a reliable criterion for single umbilical artery screening prior to 26 weeks of gestation. Doppler flow measurements in normal and SGA fetuses with single umbilical artery are not significantly different from normal fetuses. Compensatory arterial dilatation may prevent fetuses with single umbilical artery from becoming growth retarded. Copyright © 1996 International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Full-text · Article · Aug 1996 · Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology
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    ABSTRACT: Nocturnal nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) is increasingly used to treat chronic respiratory failure in a wide variety of conditions (myopathies, Ondine's curse, kyphoscoliosis, etc.) and allows a normal everyday life. Some of these diseases affect women of childbearing age. We report on a young woman suffering from primary alveolar hypoventilation, who presented with limitation of daytime activities, severe oxygen desaturation during sleep, polycythaemia and pulmonary hypertension. These abnormalities completely reversed after a few months of NIPPV applied through a nasal mask. Whilst under ventilatory assistance during sleep, she had an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a normal baby. We suggest that in selected patients requiring NIPPV, pregnancy can be contemplated with a reasonable level of safety both for the mother and the child, provided that adequate mechanical ventilatory assistance during sleep is maintained throughout pregnancy.
    Preview · Article · Sep 1995 · European Respiratory Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Nocturnal nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) is increasingly used to treat chronic respiratory failure in a wide variety of condi- tions (myopathies, Ondine's curse, kyphoscoliosis, etc.) and allows a normal every- day life. Some of these diseases affect women of childbearing age. We report on a young woman suffering from primary alveolar hypoventilation, who presented with limitation of daytime activities, severe oxygen desaturation dur- ing sleep, polycythaemia and pulmonary hypertension. These abnormalities com- pletely reversed after a few months of NIPPV applied through a nasal mask. Whilst under ventilatory assistance during sleep, she had an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a normal baby. We suggest that in selected patients requiring NIPPV, pregnancy can be con- templated with a reasonable level of safety both for the mother and the child, pro- vided that adequate mechanical ventilatory assistance during sleep is maintained throughout pregnancy.
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