M.J. Jackson

Purdue University, ウェストラファイエット, Indiana, United States

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Publications (129)70.14 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This chapter describes the analysis of the high-speed mechanical micromilling process. The chapter not only compares computational approaches to the solution of shear plane and tool face temperatures, but also explains why there is a difference in calculating temperatures generated during the micromachining process. The analysis shows that the computed temperature of the shear plane never exceeds 35°C during micromilling at spindle speeds approximately 310,000 revolutions per minute. Machining AISI 1040 steel at significantly high speeds presents significant challenges to prevent the accelerated wear of the cutting tool that is caused by the frictional interactions between chip and tool and the nature of the intermittent contact. The analysis also shows the effect of coating on reducing the interface temperatures between chip and tool and concludes that each coating has very little effect on reducing temperature at the tool face and at the primary shear zone.
    No preview · Chapter · Dec 2015

  • No preview · Chapter · Dec 2015
  • R.G. Handy · M. Whitt · M. Rodriguez · M.J. Jackson
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    ABSTRACT: There are various environmental as well as worker health and safety issues involved with manufacturing or fabrication efforts that result in the creation of particles in the nanoparticle size range. While the research in this area is in the relatively early stages, several studies have been conducted over the last decade or so that focus on the environmental and human exposure issues surrounding the anthropogenic generation of airborne ultrafine or nanometre-range particles. The purpose of this chapter is to elucidate the current state of the literature regarding nanoparticles in the workplace and environment as well as to provide the latest characterization techniques used to conduct airborne nanoscale particle measurement.
    No preview · Chapter · Dec 2015

  • No preview · Chapter · Dec 2015
  • W. Ahmed · M.J. Jackson · I.Ul Hassan
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    ABSTRACT: Nanotechnology is a term that is used to describe the science and technology related to the control and manipulation of matter and devices on a scale less than 100nm in dimension. It involves a multidisciplinary approach involving fields such as applied physics, materials science, chemistry, biology, surface science, robotics, engineering, electrical engineering and biomedical engineering. At this scale the properties of matter is dictated and there are few boundaries between scientific disciplines. Generally, two main approaches have been used in nanotechnology. These are known as the 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' approaches. The former involves building up from atoms into molecules to assemble nanostructures, materials and devices. The latter involves making structures and devices from larger entities without specific control at the atomic level. Progress in both approaches has been accelerated in recent years with the development and application of highly sensitive equipment. For example, instruments such as atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning tunnelling microscope (STM), electron beam lithography, molecular beam epitaxy, etc., have become available to push forward development in this exciting new field. These instruments allow observation and manipulation of novel nanostructures. Considerable research is being carried throughout the world in developing nanotechnology, and many new applications have emerged. However, a related term is nanomanufacturing, used to describe industrial scale manufacture of nanotechnology-based objects at high rate, low cost and reliability. In this paper we discuss the opportunities and challenges facing the transition from nanotechnology to nanomanufacturing. Tools, templates and processes are currently being developed that will enable high volume manufacturing of components and structures on a nanoscale and these are reviewed. These advancements will accelerate the development of commercial products and enable the creations of a new generation of applications in various different commercial sectors including drug delivery, cosmetics, biomedical implants, electronics, optical components, automotive and aerospace parts.
    No preview · Chapter · Jan 2015
  • M. Ahmad · E. Ahmed · N. R. Khalid · M. J. Jackson · W. Ahmed
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    ABSTRACT: Nanocrystalline ZnO powders are synthesized using a quick, simple and inexpensive combustion method. Glycine and zinc nitrate, used as fuel and oxidant/cation sources respectively, were mixed together at room temperature to form a slurry or gel. A series of experiments were performed to synthesize nanoparticles for different fuel to oxidant ratios. The rate of heating and stirring greatly influenced the combustion process. The as-synthesized powder was heat treated at elevated temperatures for varying time to remove adsorbed impurities from the surface of the ZnO nanoparticles. Both the as-synthesized and heat treated powders were characterized using a variety of analytical techniques. The hexagonal wurtzite phase of the ZnO powder was revealed from x-ray diffraction measurements. A decrease in the x-ray diffraction density (Dx) and the bulk density (D) resulted in an increase in percentage porosity (%P) of as-synthesized and heat treated ZnO powders. The range of fuel to oxidant ratios used in the present work indicates that they had a strong influence on the grain size of ZnO powders. The average grain size estimated by using the Scherer formula indicated an approximate value of 6-21 nm for the as-synthesized and heat treated samples.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · International Journal of Manufacturing
  • J.S. Morrell · M.J. Jackson
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    ABSTRACT: Uranium Processing and Properties describes developments in uranium science, engineering and processing and covers a broad spectrum of topics and applications in which these technologies are harnessed. This book offers the most up-to-date knowledge on emerging nuclear technologies and applications while also covering new and established practices for working with uranium supplies. The book also aims to provide insights into current research and processing technology developments in order to stimulate and motivate innovation among readers. Topics covered include casting technology, plate and sheet rolling, machining of uranium and uranium alloys, forming and fabrication techniques, corrosion kinetics, nondestructive evaluation and thermal modeling. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York. All rights are reserved.
    No preview · Book · Nov 2013
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    N R Khalid · E Ahmed · M Ikram · M Ahmad · D A Phoenix · A Elhissi · W Ahmed · M J Jackson
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    ABSTRACT: Photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange (MO) in water was examined using TiO 2 nanopowders under solar irradiation. These photocatalysts were successfully synthesized by hydrolysis of titanium tetra chlo-ride (TiCl 4) in the temperature range of 70-95 °C and calcined at higher temperatures of between 400 and 900 °C. The samples prepared were characterized using x-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR). UV-Vis spectrometer was used for analyzing the concentration of MO in solution at different time intervals during the photodeg-radation experiment. Parameters affecting the photodegradation rate such as catalyst crystallinity, con-centration of the catalyst, MO concentration, and pH of the solution have been investigated. The results indicate that TiO 2 nanopowder was antase at low calcination temperatures in the range of 400-500 °C. The sample calcined at 600 °C is composed of both anatase and rutile phase. Further increase in the temper-ature enhanced the intensities of diffraction peaks of the rutile phase. The size of the crystallites for all the samples prepared were found to be in the 6-13 nm range and from SEM micrographs it was in the range of 19-43 nm. The mixture of both phases exhibited a higher photoactivity in comparison with pure anatase or rutile catalysts.
    Full-text · Dataset · May 2013
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    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance
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    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance
  • M.H. Ahmed · J. A. Byrne · T.E. Keyes · W. Ahmed · A. Elhissi · M.J. Jackson · E. Ahmed
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    ABSTRACT: There is considerable interest in TiO2 for a wide range of applications; however, this chapter focuses mainly on its uses as a biomaterial, particularly for biomedical implant devices. The main characteristics required for this application have been considered. Methods for producing TiO2 and Ag doped TiO2 films are summarized. The interactions of the films containing body fluids, mainly with blood components such as proteins, are discussed. Various techniques, including surface analysis methods, have been employed to characterize the undoped and Ag doped TiO2 films. Their behaviour under normal conditions inside the body, such as physiological pH, has been investigated and results presented.
    No preview · Chapter · Oct 2012
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    ABSTRACT: Titanium may be considered a relatively new engineering material. It was discovered much later than the other commonly used metals, with its commercial application starting in the late 1940s. Its usage as an implant material began in the 1960s, despite the fact that it exhibits superior corrosion resistance and tissue acceptance when compared with stainless steels and Cr-Co-based alloys. This chapter reviews the use of titanium and titanium alloys for use in biomedical applications and its processing.
    No preview · Chapter · Oct 2012
  • C. Maranhão · J. P. Davim · M. J. Jackson
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study, the main objective is to predict the physical thermomechanical behavior when high-speed machining an aluminium alloy (7075-O) using a polycrystalline diamond (PCD) cutting tool with a variable depth of cut (DOC). An advance commercial machining finite element software was used to aid the study and to help to predict physical parameters of cutting process such as cutting forces, temperature, maximum shear stress, and plastic strain.From the simulations made, it can be concluded that the DOC mainly influences the cutting and feed forces. On the contrary, an increase of DOC does not significantly influence cutting temperature, shear stress, or plastic strain.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2011 · Materials and Manufacturing Processes
  • J. Paulo Davim · P. Reis · C. Maranhao · M. J. Jackson · G. Cabral · J. Gracio
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    ABSTRACT: The current paper presents a Finite Element Model (FEM) simulation and experimental analysis of orthogonal cutting on aluminium alloy using Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) tools. FEM machining simulations used a Lagrangian finite element‐based machining model, AdvantedgeTM, applied to predict cutting forces, temperature distribution, plastic strain, von Mises and maximum shear stresses. The orthogonal cutting model was validated by comparing cutting forces obtained experimentally with a thermo‐mechanical FEM analysis under orthogonal cutting conditions. Finally, FEM analysis prediction of the evolution of plastic strain, von Mises stress and maximum shear stresses during the machining of a commonly used aluminium alloy using PCD tools was conducted.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2010 · International Journal of Materials and Product Technology
  • C. Maranhao · J. Paulo Davim · M. J. Jackson · G. Cabral · J. Gracio
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, a prediction of the thermo mechanical behaviour of the machining of an aluminium alloy is made, using a Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) cutting tool with a variable rake angle. To aid the study, a commercial machining finite element software was used and several parameters In conclusion, from the simulations made, it was possible to predict a positive influence of the inclusion of rake angle in PCD cutting tools. A reduction of cutting forces and temperature was shown with the increase of the rake angle, allowing this way an additional extension of the tool life.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2010 · International Journal of Materials and Product Technology
  • M. J. Jackson · G. M. Robinson
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the analysis of the micromilling process by comparing various computational approaches to the solution of shear plane and tool face temperatures, and also explains why there is a discrepancy when calculating these temperatures generated during the micromachining process. The paper shows that the temperature of the shear plane never exceeds 35 °C when micromilling at spindle speeds in excess of 300,000 revolutions per minute. The paper also explains how machining high manganese content stainless steel presents significant challenges to tool wear especially at high cutting speeds. The paper compares the effectiveness of using TiCN and TiAlN coated micro tools compared to using uncoated WC-Co micro milling cutters.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2010 · Journal of Computational and Theoretical Nanoscience
  • W. Ahmed · M.J. Jackson · M.D. Whitfield

    No preview · Article · Jan 2010
  • G.M. Robinson · M.J. Jackson

    No preview · Article · Jan 2010
  • M.J. Jackson · M.D. Whitfield

    No preview · Article · Jan 2010
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The initial stages of intimate contact between an inclined wedge and low carbon steel creates significant opportunities for manufacturers of machined products to understand how dry machining and minimum quantity lubrication affect the economics of manufacturing, especially when one considers how important frictional interactions between chip and tool are on the final structure of the workpiece materials in terms of structural phase transformations. The present work not only compares various computational approaches to the solution of shear plane and tool face temperatures, but also explains why there is a large discrepancy when calculating temperature generated during machining when using Loewen and Shaw's method for calculating shear plane and tool face temperatures.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2009 · International Journal of Materials and Product Technology

Publication Stats

659 Citations
70.14 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005-2015
    • Purdue University
      • • College of Technology
      • • Birck Nanotechnology Center
      ウェストラファイエット, Indiana, United States
  • 2002-2005
    • Tennessee Technological University
      • • Department of Mechanical Engineering
      • • Center for Manufacturing Research
      Cookeville, Tennessee, United States
  • 2003
    • University of Cambridge
      • Department of Physics: Cavendish Laboratory
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
  • 2000-2001
    • University of Liverpool
      • School of Engineering
      Liverpool, England, United Kingdom
  • 1993-1995
    • Liverpool John Moores University
      Liverpool, England, United Kingdom