Emily Chan

Vanderbilt University, Нашвилл, Michigan, United States

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Publications (54)561.92 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: Effective new agents for patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) with disease progression during standard therapy regimens are needed. We hypothesized that poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor therapy in patients with CRC and inefficient tumor DNA repair mechanisms, such as those with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H), would result in synthetic lethality. Methods: This was an open-label phase II trial testing olaparib 400 mg p.o. b.i.d. for patients with disseminated, measurable CRC failing standard therapies with centrally confirmed tumor MSI status. The primary endpoint was the tumor response, assessed by RECIST, version 1.0. The secondary endpoints were safety/toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Thirty-three patients (20 microsatellite stable [MSS], 13 MSI-H) were enrolled. The median age for all patients was 57 years and for MSS and MSI-H patients was 51 and 61 years, respectively. All patients received at least one 28-day cycle of olaparib. No patient had a complete or partial response. Nausea (48%), fatigue (36%), and vomiting (33%) were the most commonly reported treatment-related adverse events. The median PFS for all patients was 1.84 months. No statistically significant differences were found in the median PFS or OS for the MSS group compared with the MSI-H group. Conclusion: Single-agent olaparib delivered after failure of standard systemic therapy did not demonstrate activity for CRC patients, regardless of microsatellite status. Future trials, testing PARP inhibitors in patients with CRC should focus on the use of DNA-damaging chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, combined with PARP inhibitors, remembering the toxicity reported in the present study. Implications for practice: Microsatellite instability (MSI-H) colorectal tumors exhibit hypermethylation in tumor mismatch repair genes, or have mutations in one or more of these genes resulting from a germ-line defect (Lynch syndrome). PARP inhibitors such as olaparib are most effective in tumors associated with inability to repair DNA damage. However, in this trial, single agent olaparib failed to elicit responses in patients with MSI-H colorectal tumors, and in those with microsatellite-stable tumors. It is possible that by adding olaparib to radiation therapy, or to a systemic DNA damaging agent, tumor lethality could be obtained. However, the price would be increased toxicity.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Oncologist
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    ABSTRACT: Severe (grade≥3) adverse events (AEs) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy regimens can result in treatment delays or cessation, and, in extreme cases, life-threatening complications. Current genetic biomarkers for 5-FU toxicity prediction, however, account for only a small proportion of toxic cases. In the current study, we assessed DPYD variants suggested to correlate with 5-FU toxicity, a deep intronic variant (c.1129-5923 C>G), and four variants within a haplotype (hapB3) in 1953 stage III colon cancer patients who received adjuvant FOLFOX±cetuximab. Logistic regression was used to assess multivariable associations between DPYD variant status and AEs common to 5-FU (5FU-AEs). In our study cohort, 1228 patients (62.9%) reported any grade≥3 AE (overall AE), with 638 patients (32.7%) reporting any grade≥3 5FU-AE. Only 32 of 78 (41.0%) patients carrying DPYD c.1129-5923 C>G and the completely linked hapB3 variants c.1236 C>G and c.959-51 T>C showed at least one grade≥3 5FU-AE, resulting in no statistically significant association (adjusted odds ratio=1.47, 95% confidence interval=0.90-2.43, P=0.1267). No significant associations were identified between c.1129-5923 C>G/hapB3 and overall grade≥3 AE rate. Our results suggest that c.1129-5923 C>G/hapB3 have limited predictive value for severe toxicity to 5-FU-based combination chemotherapy. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26658227 PMID: 26658227
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Pharmacogenetics and Genomics
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Local excision is an organ-preserving treatment alternative to transabdominal resection for patients with stage I rectal cancer. However, local excision alone is associated with a high risk of local recurrence and inferior survival compared with transabdominal rectal resection. We investigated the oncological and functional outcomes of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and local excision for patients with stage T2N0 rectal cancer. Methods: We did a multi-institutional, single-arm, open-label, non-randomised, phase 2 trial of patients with clinically staged T2N0 distal rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy at 26 American College of Surgeons Oncology Group institutions. Patients with clinical T2N0 rectal adenocarcinoma staged by endorectal ultrasound or endorectal coil MRI, measuring less than 4 cm in greatest diameter, involving less than 40% of the circumference of the rectum, located within 8 cm of the anal verge, and with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of at least 2 were included in the study. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy consisted of capecitabine (original dose 825 mg/m(2) twice daily on days 1-14 and 22-35), oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) on weeks 1, 2, 4, and 5), and radiation (5 days a week at 1·8 Gy per day for 5 weeks to a dose of 45 Gy, followed by a boost of 9 Gy, for a total dose of 54 Gy) followed by local excision. Because of adverse events during chemoradiotherapy, the dose of capecitabine was reduced to 725 mg/m(2) twice-daily, 5 days per week, for 5 weeks, and the boost of radiation was reduced to 5·4 Gy, for a total dose of 50·4 Gy. The primary endpoint was 3-year disease-free survival for all eligible patients (intention-to-treat population) and for patients who completed chemotherapy and radiation, and had ypT0, ypT1, or ypT2 tumours, and negative resection margins (per-protocol group). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00114231. Findings: Between May 25, 2006, and Oct 22, 2009, 79 eligible patients were recruited to the trial and started neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Two patients had no surgery and one had a total mesorectal excision. Four additional patients completed protocol treatment, but one had a positive margin and three had ypT3 tumours. Thus, the per-protocol population consisted of 72 patients. Median follow-up was 56 months (IQR 46-63) for all patients. The estimated 3-year disease-free survival for the intention-to-treat group was 88·2% (95% CI 81·3-95·8), and for the per-protocol group was 86·9% (79·3-95·3). Of 79 eligible patients, 23 (29%) had grade 3 gastrointestinal adverse events, 12 (15%) had grade 3-4 pain, and 12 (15%) had grade 3-4 haematological adverse events during chemoradiation. Of the 77 patients who had surgery, six (8%) had grade 3 pain, three (4%) had grade 3-4 haemorrhage, and three (4%) had gastrointestinal adverse events. Interpretation: Although the observed 3-year disease free survival was not as high as anticipated, our data suggest that neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by local excision might be considered as an organ-preserving alternative in carefully selected patients with clinically staged T2N0 tumours who refuse, or are not candidates for, transabdominal resection. Funding: National Cancer Institute and Sanofi-Aventis.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · The Lancet Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated the influence of RAS mutation status on the treatment effect of panitumumab in a prospective-retrospective analysis of a randomized, multicenter phase 3 study of panitumumab plus fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) versus FOLFIRI alone as second-line therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC; ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT0039183). Outcomes were from the study's primary analysis. RAS mutations beyond KRAS exon 2 (KRAS exons 3, 4; NRAS exons 2, 3, 4; BRAF exon 15) were detected by bidirectional Sanger sequencing in wild-type KRAS exon 2 tumor specimens. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were coprimary endpoints. The RAS ascertainment rate was 85%; 18% of wild-type KRAS exon 2 tumors harbored other RAS mutations. For PFS and OS, the hazard ratio for panitumumab plus FOLFIRI versus FOLFIRI alone more strongly favored panitumumab in the wild-type RAS population than in the wild-type KRAS exon 2 population (PFS HR, 0.70 [95%CI=0.54‒0.91];P=0.007 versus 0.73 [95%CI=0.59-0.90];P=0.004; OS HR, 0.81 [95%CI=0.63‒1.03];P=0.08 versus 0.85 [95%CI=0.70‒1.04];P=0.12). Patients with RAS mutations were unlikely to benefit from panitumumab. Among RAS wild-type patients, the objective response rate was 41% in the panitumumab-FOLFIRI group versus 10% in the FOLFIRI group. Patients with RAS mutations were unlikely to benefit from panitumumab-FOLFIRI and the benefit-risk of panitumumab-FOLFIRI was improved in the wild-type RAS population compared to the wild-type KRAS exon 2 population. These findings support RAS testing for patients with mCRC. Copyright © 2015, American Association for Cancer Research.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Clinical Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: BRAF V600 mutations occur in various nonmelanoma cancers. We undertook a histology-independent phase 2 "basket" study of vemurafenib in BRAF V600 mutation-positive nonmelanoma cancers. We enrolled patients in six prespecified cancer cohorts; patients with all other tumor types were enrolled in a seventh cohort. A total of 122 patients with BRAF V600 mutation-positive cancer were treated, including 27 patients with colorectal cancer who received vemurafenib and cetuximab. The primary end point was the response rate; secondary end points included progression-free and overall survival. In the cohort with non-small-cell lung cancer, the response rate was 42% (95% confidence interval [CI], 20 to 67) and median progression-free survival was 7.3 months (95% CI, 3.5 to 10.8). In the cohort with Erdheim-Chester disease or Langerhans'-cell histiocytosis, the response rate was 43% (95% CI, 18 to 71); the median treatment duration was 5.9 months (range, 0.6 to 18.6), and no patients had disease progression during therapy. There were anecdotal responses among patients with pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, anaplastic thyroid cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, salivary-duct cancer, ovarian cancer, and clear-cell sarcoma and among patients with colorectal cancer who received vemurafenib and cetuximab. Safety was similar to that in prior studies of vemurafenib for melanoma. BRAF V600 appears to be a targetable oncogene in some, but not all, nonmelanoma cancers. Preliminary vemurafenib activity was observed in non-small-cell lung cancer and in Erdheim-Chester disease and Langerhans'-cell histiocytosis. The histologic context is an important determinant of response in BRAF V600-mutated cancers. (Funded by F. Hoffmann-La Roche/Genentech; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01524978.).
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · New England Journal of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Rectal Cancer begin with the clinical presentation of the patient to the primary care physician or gastroenterologist and address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, perioperative treatment, posttreatment surveillance, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, and survivorship. The NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel meets at least annually to review comments from reviewers within their institutions, examine relevant new data from publications and abstracts, and reevaluate and update their recommendations. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points from the 2015 NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel meeting. Major discussion topics this year were perioperative therapy options and surveillance for patients with stage I through III disease. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2015, All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
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    ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Rectal Cancer begin with the clinical presentation of the patient to the primary care physician or gastroenterologist and address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, perioperative treatment, posttreatment surveillance, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, and survivorship. The NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel meets at least annually to review comments from reviewers within their institutions, examine relevant new data from publications and abstracts, and reevaluate and update their recommendations. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points from the 2015 NCCN Rectal Cancer Panel meeting. Major discussion topics this year were perioperative therapy options and surveillance for patients with stage I through III disease. Copyright © 2015 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
  • Emily Chan · Jordan Berlin
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    ABSTRACT: Biliary tract cancers are a heterogeneous group of cancers that arise in either the intra- or extrahepatic bile ducts or the gallbladder. Local therapy with surgical resection and perhaps radiation therapy is used for localized disease. There is no known effective adjuvant therapy, although various combinations have been used clinically without definitive data showing a benefit. The most standard chemotherapy for metastatic disease is gemcitabine plus cisplatin based on a single positive randomized trial. Genetic mutations that may lead to better, targeted therapy choices are being identified, albeit with variable frequency. Early studies of targeted agents have been negative, but these were in unselected patients where it was unknown whether the target was activated in any individual patient. Careful selection of patients enrolling onto trials of targeted agents will make the subsets of biliary tract cancers even smaller but is likely necessary to improve outcomes from these deadly diseases. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Clinical Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: IHL-305 is a PEGylated liposomal formulation of irinotecan (CPT-11). The objective of this study was to evaluate the factors associated with interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of IHL-305 in patients with advanced solid tumors. IHL-305 was administered intravenously once every 4 weeks as part of a Phase I study. Pharmacokinetic studies of the liposomal sum total CPT-11, released CPT-11, SN-38, SN-38G, 7-ethyl-10-[4-N-(5-aminopentanoic acid)-1-piperidino]-carbonyloxycamptothecin, and 7-ethyl-10-[4-amino-1-piperidino]-carbonyloxycamptothecin in plasma were performed. Noncompartmental and compartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were conducted using pharmacokinetic data for sum total CPT-11. The pharmacokinetic variability of IHL-305 is associated with linear and nonlinear clearance. Patients whose age and body composition (ratio of total body weight to ideal body weight [TBW/IBW]) were greater than the median age and TBW/IBW of the study had a 1.7-fold to 2.6-fold higher ratio of released CPT-11 area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC) to sum total CPT-11 AUC. Patients aged <60 years had a 1.3-fold higher ratio of percent decrease in monocytes at nadir to percent decrease in absolute neutrophil count at nadir as compared with patients aged ≥60 years. There was an inverse relationship between patient age and percent decrease in monocytes at nadir, ie, younger patients have a higher percent decrease in monocytes. Patients with a higher percent decrease in monocytes at nadir have a decreased plasma exposure of sum total CPT-11. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of IHL-305 are consistent with those of other PEGylated liposomal carriers. Interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of IHL-305 was associated with age, body composition, and monocytes.
    Preview · Article · Feb 2015 · International Journal of Nanomedicine
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    ABSTRACT: The immune modulatory oligonucleotide IMO-2055 (EMD 1201081) is a phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide agonist of Toll-like receptor 9. In preclinical studies, IMO-2055 was shown to activate natural killer cells and to support the antitumor activity of monoclonal antibodies. This phase 1b, open-label, 3 + 3 dose-escalation trial was performed to determine the recommended phase 2 dose of IMO-2055 combined with FOLFIRI/cetuximab in patients with previously treated, advanced/metastatic colorectal cancer (NCT00719199). Patients received 14-day cycles of cetuximab (days 1/8; 400 mg/m(2) day 1 cycle 1, 250 mg/m(2) for subsequent days/cycles), irinotecan (day 1; 180 mg/m(2)), folinic acid (day 1; 400 mg/m(2) racemic or 200 mg/m(2) L-form), 5-fluorouracil (day 1; 400 mg/m(2) intravenous bolus, followed by 2,400 mg/m(2) as 46-h infusion), and escalating IMO-2055 doses (days 1/8; 0.16, 0.32, 0.48 mg/kg). Fifteen patients received IMO-2055, including six, three, and six patients who were treated at the dose levels 0.16, 0.32, and 0.48 mg/kg, respectively. One dose-limiting toxicity was observed (grade 3 fatigue; at dose level 0.16 mg/kg). The most common adverse events were injection site reactions, diarrhea, fatigue, hypomagnesemia, and stomatitis. One patient achieved a confirmed partial response; 12 had stable disease, including five with stable disease ≥4.0 months. IMO-2055 combined with FOLFIRI/cetuximab was well tolerated at all dose levels tested. IMO-2055 0.48 mg/kg was considered as the recommended phase 2 dose.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Answer questions and earn CME/CNEThe management of squamous cell carcinomas of the anal canal has evolved from surgery as first-line treatment to curative chemoradiation, with surgery reserved for salvage. Significant progress has been made in understanding how to most effectively deliver chemotherapy and reduce toxicity through advancements in radiation delivery. The purpose of this article is to review the multimodality approach to the diagnosis and management of anal cancer based on a review of the published data and in light of available guidelines. CA Cancer J Clin 2015. © 2015 American Cancer Society.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · CA A Cancer Journal for Clinicians
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    ABSTRACT: Background Retrospective studies indicate associations between TSER (thymidylate synthase enhancer region) genotypes and clinical outcomes in patients receiving 5-FU based chemotherapy, but well-controlled prospective validation has been lacking. Methods In this phase II study (NCT00515216 registered through ClinicalTrials.gov, http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00515216), patients with “good risk” TSER genotypes (at least one TSER*2 allele) were treated with FOLFOX chemotherapy to determine whether prospective patient selection can improve overall response rates (ORR) in patients with gastric and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancers, compared with historical outcomes in unselected patients (estimated 43%). Results The ORR in genotype-selected patients was 39.1% (9 partial responses out of 23 evaluable patients, 95% CI, 22.2 to 59.2), not achieving the primary objective of improving ORR. An encouraging disease control rate (DCR, consisting of partial responses and stable diseases) of 95.7% was noted and patients with homozygous TSER*2 genotype showed better tumor response. Conclusions In this first prospective, multi-institutional study in patients with gastric or GEJ cancers, selecting patients with at least one TSER*2 allele did not improve the ORR but led to an encouraging DCR. Further studies are needed to investigate the utility of selecting patients homozygous for the TSER*2 allele and additional genomic markers in improving clinical outcomes for patients with gastric and GEJ cancers. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00515216
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: OSI-906 is a potent inhibitor of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) and insulin receptor (IR). The purpose of this study was to determine the MTD, safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and preliminary activity of OSI-906 in patients with advanced solid tumors. Patients and methods: This was a nonrandomized, open-label, phase I, dose-escalation study in patients with advanced solid tumors. The study also included a diabetic expansion cohort and a biomarker expansion cohort of patients with colorectal cancer. Patients were treated with OSI-906 by once- or twice-daily continuous dosing schedules. Results: Of 95 patients enrolled in the study, 86 received at least one dose of OSI-906. Dose-limiting toxicities included QTc prolongation, grade 2 abdominal pain and nausea, hyperglycemia, and elevation of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase (all grade 3). The MTDs were established to be 400 mg once daily and 150 mg twice daily. The recommended phase II dose was determined as 150 mg twice daily. OSI-906 was rapidly absorbed with a half-life of 5 hours, and steady-state plasma concentrations were achieved by day 8. Pharmacodynamic effects on IGF1R and IR phosphorylation were levels observed and correlated with plasma concentrations of OSI-906. Thirty-one patients had stable disease as their best response. One patient with melanoma had a radiographic partial response and underwent resection, during which only melanocytic debris but no viable tumor tissue was identified. Conclusions: At the established MTD, OSI-906 was well tolerated and antitumor activity was observed. These results support further evaluation of OSI-906 in solid tumors.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2014 · Clinical Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Colon Cancer address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, perioperative treatment, posttreatment surveillance, management of recurrent and metastatic disease,and survivorship. This portion of the guidelines focuses on the use of systemic therapy in metastatic disease. The management of metastatic colorectal cancer involves a continuum of care in which patients are exposed sequentially to a variety of active agents, either in combinations or as single agents. Choice of therapy is based on the goals of treatment, the type and timing of prior therapy, the different efficacy and toxicity profiles of the drugs, the mutational status of the tumor, and patient preference.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · Annals of Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: KRAS and BRAF (V600E) mutations are important predictive and prognostic markers, respectively, in colon cancer, but little is known about patient and clinical factors associated with them. Methods: Two thousand three hundred twenty-six of 3397 patients in the N0147 phase III adjuvant trial for stage III colon cancer completed a patient questionnaire. Primary tumors were assessed for KRAS and BRAF (V600E) mutations and defective mismatch repair (dMMR) status. Logistic regression models and categorical data analysis were used to identify associations of patient and tumor characteristics with mutation status. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: KRAS (35%) and BRAF (V600E) (14%) mutations were nearly mutually exclusive. KRAS mutations were more likely to be present in patients without a family history of colon cancer and never smokers. Tumors with KRAS mutations were less likely to have dMMR (odds ratio [OR] = 0.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.15 to 0.31; P < .001) and high-grade histology (OR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.59 to 0.92; P < .001) but were more often right-sided. Among KRAS-mutated tumors, those with a Gly13Asp mutation tended to have dMMR and high-grade histology. Tumors with BRAF (V600E) mutations were more likely to be seen in patients who were aged 70 years or older (OR = 3.33; 95% CI = 2.50 to 4.42; P < .001) and current or former smokers (OR = 1.64; 95% CI = 1.26 to 2.14; P < .001) but less likely in non-whites and men. Tumors with BRAF (V600E) mutations were more likely to be right-sided and to have four or more positive lymph nodes, high-grade histology, and dMMR. Conclusions: Specific patient and tumor characteristics are associated with KRAS and BRAF (V600E) mutations.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute
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    ABSTRACT: This trial was designed to assess efficacy and safety of erlotinib with sorafenib in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. An exploratory correlative study analyzing pretreatment serum samples using a multivariate protein mass spectrometry-based test (VeriStrat®), previously shown to correlate with outcomes in lung cancer patients treated with erlotinib, was performed. Patients received sorafenib 400 mg daily along with erlotinib 150 mg daily with a primary endpoint of 8-week progression free survival (PFS) rate. Pretreatment serum sample analysis by VeriStrat was done blinded to clinical and outcome data; the endpoints were PFS and overall survival (OS). Difference between groups (by VeriStrat classification) was assessed using log-rank P values; hazard ratios (HR) were obtained from Cox proportional hazards model. Thirty-six patients received study drug and were included in the survival analysis. Eight-week PFS rate of 46% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.32-0.67) did not meet the primary endpoint of a rate ≥70%. Thirty-two patients were included in the correlative analysis, and VeriStrat "Good" patients had superior PFS (HR = 0.18, 95% CI: 0.06-0.57; P = 0.001) and OS (HR = 0.31 95% CI: 0.13-0.77, P = 0.008) compared to VeriStrat "Poor" patients. Grade 3 toxicities of this regimen included fever, anemia, diarrhea, dehydration, rash, and altered liver function. This study did not meet the primary endpoint, and this combination will not be further pursued. In this small retrospective analysis, the proteomic classification was significantly associated with clinical outcomes and is being further evaluated in ongoing studies.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Cancer Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Previously, this study showed significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) in pmab + FOLFIRI vs FOLFIRI (HR=0.73; 95% CI: 0.59-0.90; p=0.004) and a trend toward improved overall survival (OS; HR=0.85; 95% CI: 0.70-1.04; P=0.12; Peeters et al. JCO 2010). Recently, analysis from 1st-line mCRC PRIME study showed that mutations in RAS genes (KRAS/NRAS exons 2/3/4) predicted a lack of response to pmab (Douillard et al. NEJM 2013). Methods: The primary objective was to assess the tx effect of pmab + FOLFIRI vs FOLFIRI on OS and PFS based on RAS mutation status in the primary analysis population. Bidirectional Sanger sequencing was used to detect mutations in KRAS exons 3, 4 and NRAS exons 2, 3, 4 in patients (pts) with known WT KRAS exon 2 mCRC. Results: In this prospective retrospective analysis, overall RAS ascertainment rate was 85% (n=1008/1186). 18% of the WT KRAS exon 2 pts harbored additional RAS mutations (n=107/597). Efficacy is shown (Table). Tx HR for pts with WT RAS was 0.803 (95% CI: 0.629-1.024; P=0.077) for OS and 0.695 (95% CI: 0.536-0.903; P=0.006) for PFS. Conclusions: Improvements were observed in the tx effect of pmab + FOLFIRI vs FOLFIRI on OS and PFS in the WT RAS group vs the WT KRAS exon 2 group. Pts with MT RAS mCRC are unlikely to benefit by the addition of pmab to FOLFIRI, similar to pts with MT KRAS exon 2 mCRC in this study. These findings are consistent with previously reported outcomes by RAS status and support RAS testing to determine potentially appropriate pts for pmab tx. Clinical trial information: NCT00339183. Pmab + FOLFIRI (N = 303) FOLFIRI (N = 294) HR (95% CI) Descriptive p value WT RAS,a n 204 211 Median OS - mos 95% CI 16.2 14.5, 19.7 13.9 11.9, 16.1 0.803 0.629, 1.024 0.077 Median PFS - mos 95% CI 6.4 5.5, 7.4 4.4 3.7, 5.5 0.695 0.536, 0.903 0.006 MT RAS,b n 299 294 Median OS - mos 95% CI 11.8 10.4, 13.1 11.1 10.2, 12.4 0.914 0.759, 1.101 0.345 Median PFS - mos 95% CI 4.8 3.7, 5.5 4.0 3.6, 5.5 0.861 0.705, 1.053 0.144 WT KRAS exon 2 MT RAS,c n 61 46
    No preview · Conference Paper · Jan 2014
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    Emily Chan · Jordan Berlin

    Preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Journal of Clinical Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: The study 20050181 demonstrated significant improvements in progression-free survival (PFS), objective response, and a nonsignificant trend toward increased overall survival (OS) with panitumumab-FOLFIRI versus FOLFIRI alone for second-line wild-type (WT) KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Updated long-term data from a prespecified descriptive analysis are reported. Patients receiving one prior mCRC treatment were randomly assigned (1:1) to panitumumab (6.0 mg/kg)-FOLFIRI versus FOLFIRI every 2 weeks. Co-primary end points (PFS and OS) were prospectively analyzed by tumor KRAS status. One thousand one hundred and eighty-six patients were randomly assigned. In patients with WT KRAS tumors, panitumumab-FOLFIRI significantly improved PFS versus FOLFIRI [median 6.7 versus 4.9 months; hazard ratio (HR) 0.82 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69, 0.97]; P = 0.023]. A trend toward longer OS was observed (median 14.5 versus 12.5 months; HR 0.92 [95% CI 0.78, 1.10]; P = 0.37). Response rates improved from 10% to 36% (P < 0.0001). From post hoc analyses in patients receiving prior oxaliplatin-bevacizumab, panitumumab-FOLFIRI improved PFS (median 6.4 versus 3.7 months; HR 0.58 [95% CI 0.37, 0.90]; P = 0.014). PFS and OS appeared longer for worst-grade skin toxicity of 2-4, versus 0-1 or FOLFIRI. Safety results were as previously reported and consistent with the known toxicities with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. These data confirm the primary efficacy and safety findings of this trial and support panitumumab-FOLFIRI as a second-line treatment of WT KRAS mCRC.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · Annals of Oncology

Publication Stats

2k Citations
561.92 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007-2015
    • Vanderbilt University
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Division of Hematology and Oncology
      Нашвилл, Michigan, United States
    • Gateway-Vanderbilt Cancer Treatment Center
      Clarksville, Tennessee, United States