Jennifer C Moïsi

Agence de Médecine Préventive, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (27)167.11 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Prior antibiotic use, contamination, limited blood volume, and processing delays reduce yield of blood cultures for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We performed immunochromatographic testing (ICT) on broth from incubated blood culture bottles and real-time lytA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on broth and whole blood and compared findings to blood culture in patients with suspected bacteremia. We selected 383 patients in Mali and 586 patients in Thailand based on their blood culture results: 75 and 31 were positive for pneumococcus, 100 and 162 were positive for other pathogens, and 208 and 403 were blood culture negative, respectively. ICT and PCR of blood culture broth were at least 87% sensitive and 97% specific compared with blood culture; whole blood PCR was 75-88% sensitive and 96-100% specific. Pneumococcal yields in children < 5 years of age increased from 2.9% to 10.7% in Mali with > 99% of additional cases detected by whole blood PCR, and from 0.07% to 5.1% in Thailand with two-thirds of additional cases identified by ICT. Compared with blood culture, ICT and lytA PCR on cultured broth were highly sensitive and specific but their ability to improve pneumococcal identification varied by site. Further studies of these tools are needed before widespread implementation.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Many surface proteins thought to promote Streptocococcus pneumoniae virulence have recently been discovered and are currently being considered as future vaccine targets. We assessed the prevalence of 16 virulence genes among 435 S. pneumoniae invasive isolates from France and the "African meningitis belt" region, with particular focus on serotype 1 (Sp1), to compare their geographical distribution, assess their association with site of infection and evaluate their potential interest as new vaccine candidates. Methods: Detection by PCR of pspA (+families), pspC (+pspC.4), pavA, lytA, phtA,B,D,E, nanA,B,C, rrgA (Pilus-1), sipA (Pilus-2), pcpA and psrp was performed on all isolates, as well as antibiotic resistance testing and MLVA typing (+MLST on 54 representative strains). Determination of ply alleles was performed by sequencing (Sp1 isolates). Results: MLVA and virulence genes profiles segregated Sp1 isolates into 2 groups that followed continent distribution. The ply allele 5 and most of the genes that were variable (nanC, Pilus-2, psrp, pcpA, phtD) were present in the French Sp1 isolates (PMEN clone Sweden1-28, ST306) but absent from the African ones. Whereas all African Sp1 isolates clustered into a single MLST CC (CC217), MLVA distinguished two CCs that followed temporal evolution. Pilus-2 and psrp were more prevalent in bacteraemic pneumonia yielded isolates and phtB in meningitis-related isolates. Considering vaccine candidates, phtD was less prevalent than anticipated (50%) and pcpA varied importantly between France and Africa (98% versus 34%). Pilus-1 was carried by 7-11% of isolates and associated with β-lactams resistance. Conclusions: Most virulence genes were carried by the European ST306 clone but were lacking on Sp1 isolates circulating in the African meningitis belt, where a more serious pattern of infection is observed. While virulence proteins are now considered as vaccine targets, the geographical differences in their prevalence could affect the efficacy expected from future vaccines.
    Preview · Article · Jul 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: S. pneumoniae serotype 1 (Sp1) constitutes an important cause of seasonal endemic meningitis in all age groups in the African meningitis belt. Despite a higher meningitis incidence, the Burkinabe population has Sp1-specific antibody seroprevalence similar to that reported in UK. We aimed to establish whether functional activity (OPA) of pneumococcal IgG naturally present in Burkina Faso differs from that seen in UK individuals and to compare OPA generated by natural and vaccine-induced immunity. Samples collected from pneumococcal-vaccine naive Burkinabe and UK subjects were matched for age (1-39years) and anti-Sp1 IgG level, then analyzed for OPA to 3 serotypes (1,5,19A) and compared to post-vaccine samples. Furthermore, Burkina samples were assessed for IgG avidity and serotype-specific IgM concentrations. 169 matched sera from both populations were selected. A greater proportion of Burkinabe subjects aged 1-19 years had functional Sp1 activity (OPA>0.8) compared to UK subjects (12% vs 2%,p<0.001); however proportions were similar among adults (9%). The correlation between Sp1 IgG concentration and OPA was good (p<0.001) but many individuals had non-functional IgG which was not related to avidity. While Sp1 IgM concentrations correlated with OPA, not all the function in serum with low IgG could be attributed to IgM. Finally, vaccine induced Sp1 specific IgG was more functional than equivalent amounts of naturally occurring IgG. Despite a substantially higher pneumococcal meningitis incidence, no decreased functional immunity to Sp1 could be evidenced in the Burkinabe population compared to UK. Furthermore naturally induced antibodies were less functional than vaccine induced antibodies. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Clinical and vaccine Immunology: CVI
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    ABSTRACT: The GAVI Alliance supported10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) introduction in Kenya. We estimated the cost-effectiveness of introducing either PCV10 or the13-valent vaccine (PCV13) from a societal perspective and explored the incremental impact of including indirect vaccine effects. The costs and effects of pneumococcal vaccination among infants born in Kenya in 2010 were assessed using a decision analytic model comparing PCV10 or PCV13, in turn, with no vaccination. Direct vaccine effects were estimated as a reduction in the incidence of pneumococcal meningitis, sepsis, bacteraemic pneumonia and non-bacteraemic pneumonia. Pneumococcal disease incidence was extrapolated from a population-based hospital surveillance system in Kilifi and adjustments were made for variable access to care across Kenya. We used vaccine efficacy estimates from a trial in The Gambia and accounted for serotype distribution in Kilifi. We estimated indirect vaccine protection and serotype replacement by extrapolating from the USA. Multivariable sensitivity analysis was conducted using Monte Carlo simulation. We assumed a vaccine price of US$ 3.50 per dose. The annual cost of delivering PCV10 was approximately US$14 million. We projected a 42.7% reduction in pneumococcal disease episodes leading to a US$1.97 million reduction in treatment costs and a 6.1% reduction in childhood mortality annually. In the base case analysis, costs per discounted DALY and per death averted by PCV10, amounted to US$ 59 (95% CI 26-103) and US$ 1,958 (95% CI 866-3,425), respectively. PCV13 introduction improved the cost-effectiveness ratios by approximately 20% and inclusion of indirect effects improved cost-effectiveness ratios by 43-56%. The break-even prices for introduction of PCV10 and PCV13 are US$ 0.41 and 0.51, respectively. Introducing either PCV10 or PCV13 in Kenya is highly cost-effective from a societal perspective. Indirect effects, if they occur, would significantly improve the cost-effectiveness.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2013 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Dakar discussion group on priorities for research on epidemic meningococcal disease in Africa,. For over 100 years, large epidemics of meningococcal meningitis have occurred every few years in areas of the African Sahel and sub-Sahel known as the African meningitis belt. Until recently, the main approach to the control of these epidemics has been reactive vaccination with a polysaccharide vaccine after an outbreak has reached a defined threshold and provision of easy access to effective treatment but this approach has not prevented the occurrence of new epidemics. Meningococcal conjugate vaccines, which can prevent meningococcal carriage and thus interrupt transmission, may be more effective than polysaccharide vaccines at preventing epidemics. Because the majority of African epidemics have been caused by serogroup A meningococci, a serogroup A polysaccharide/tetanus toxoid protein conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) has recently been developed. Results from an initial evaluation of the impact of this vaccine on meningococcal disease and meningococcal carriage in Burkina Faso have been encouraging. To review how the research agenda for meningococcal disease in Africa has been changed by the advent of PsA-TT and to define a new set of research priorities for study of meningococcal infection in Africa, a meeting of 41 scientists was held in Dakar, Senegal on April 24th and 25th 2012. The research recommendations developed during the course of this meeting are presented in this paper. The need for enhanced surveillance for meningitis in defined populations with good diagnostic facilities in African countries at risk of epidemics was identified as the highest priority. This is needed to determine the duration of protection against serogroup A meningococcal disease provided by PsA-TT and to determine the risk of disease and carriage caused by meningococci of other serogroups. Other research areas given high priority included identification and validation of serological correlates of protection against meningococcal disease and carriage, development of improved methods for detecting carriage and epidemiological studies aimed at determining the reasons underlying the peculiar epidemiology of meningococcal disease in the African meningitis belt. Minutes and working papers from the meeting are provided in supplementary tables and some of the presentations made at the meeting are available on the MenAfriCar consortium website (www.menafricar.org) and on the web site of the Centers for Disease Control (www.cdc.gov).
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2013 · Vaccine
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated pneumococcal serotype/group distribution using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing on cerebrospinal fluid collected from patients from Burkina Faso and Togo who presented for care during 2007–2009. We identified 282 pneumococcal meningitis cases based on PCR, latex agglutination, or culture, of which 206 underwent serotyping. Serotype 1 was identified for 18% of serotyped cases from patients aged <5 years and 66% of those aged ≥5 years. The 13-valent and 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV-13 and PCV-10) contain 53% of serotypes identified among children age <5 years and 76–77% among persons aged ≥5 years. Pneumococcal meningitis was highly seasonal regardless of serotype. Data from this study emphasize the potential usefulness of PCVs among older children and adults.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2012 · Vaccine
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    ABSTRACT: Summary The Kilifi Health and Demographic Surveillance System (KHDSS), located on the Indian Ocean coast of Kenya, was established in 2000 as a record of births, pregnancies, migration events and deaths and is maintained by 4-monthly household visits. The study area was selected to capture the majority of patients admitted to Kilifi District Hospital. The KHDSS has 260 000 residents and the hospital admits 4400 paediatric patients and 3400 adult patients per year. At the hospital, morbidity events are linked in real time by a computer search of the population register. Linked surveillance was extended to KHDSS vaccine clinics in 2008. KHDSS data have been used to define the incidence of hospital presentation with childhood infectious diseases (e.g. rotavirus diarrhoea, pneumococcal disease), to test the association between genetic risk factors (e.g. thalassaemia and sickle cell disease) and infectious diseases, to define the community prevalence of chronic diseases (e.g. epilepsy), to evaluate access to health care and to calculate the operational effectiveness of major public health interventions (e.g. conjugate Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine). Rapport with residents is maintained through an active programme of community engagement. A system of collaborative engagement exists for sharing data on survival, morbidity, socio-economic status and vaccine coverage.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2012 · International Journal of Epidemiology
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    ABSTRACT: To develop a case definition for the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) project, we sought a widely acceptable classification that was linked to existing pneumonia research and focused on very severe cases. We began with the World Health Organization’s classification of severe/very severe pneumonia and refined it through literature reviews and a 2-stage process of expert consultation. PERCH will study hospitalized children, aged 1–59 months, with pneumonia who present with cough or difficulty breathing and have either severe pneumonia (lower chest wall indrawing) or very severe pneumonia (central cyanosis, difficulty breastfeeding/drinking, vomiting everything, convulsions, lethargy, unconsciousness, or head nodding). It will exclude patients with recent hospitalization and children with wheeze whose indrawing resolves after bronchodilator therapy. The PERCH investigators agreed upon standard interpretations of the symptoms and signs. These will be maintained by a clinical standardization monitor who conducts repeated instruction at each site and by recurrent local training and testing.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2012 · Clinical Infectious Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted a prospective pilot study over a 1-year period in New Caledonia in preparation for the Pneumonia Research for Child Health (PERCH) project. The pathogens associated with hospitalized lower respiratory infections in children were identified through the use of culture of induced sputum and blood, urinary antigen detection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on respiratory specimens, and serology on paired sera. Respiratory viruses were detected on respiratory specimens by immunofluorescence and PCR, and by serology on paired sera. Pathogens were detected in 87.9% of the 108 hospitalized cases. Viruses represented 81.6% of the 152 pathogens detected. Respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus were the most frequent, accounting for 32.2% and 24.3% of the pathogens identified, respectively. Only 26.3% of 99 induced sputum specimens collected were determined to be of good quality, which may be a consequence of the collection method used.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2012 · Clinical Infectious Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: As a case-control study of etiology, the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) project also provides an opportunity to assess the risk factors for severe pneumonia in hospitalized children at 7 sites. We identified relevant risk factors by literature review and iterative expert consultation. Decisions for inclusion in PERCH were based on comparability to published data, analytic plans, data collection costs and logistic feasibility, including interviewer time and subject fatigue. We aimed to standardize questions at all sites, but significant variation in the economic, cultural, and geographic characteristics of sites made it difficult to obtain this objective. Despite these challenges, the depth of the evaluation of multiple risk factors across the breadth of the PERCH sites should furnish new and valuable information about the major risk factors for childhood severe and very severe pneumonia, including risk factors for pneumonia caused by specific etiologies, in developing countries.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2012 · Clinical Infectious Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: As a case-control study of etiology, the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) project also provides an opportunity to assess the risk factors for severe pneumonia in hospitalized children at 7 sites. We identified relevant risk factors by literature review and iterative expert consultation. Decisions for inclusion in PERCH were based on comparability to published data, analytic plans, data collection costs and logistic feasibility, including interviewer time and subject fatigue. We aimed to standardize questions at all sites, but significant variation in the economic, cultural, and geographic characteristics of sites made it difficult to obtain this objective. Despite these challenges, the depth of the evaluation of multiple risk factors across the breadth of the PERCH sites should furnish new and valuable information about the major risk factors for childhood severe and very severe pneumonia, including risk factors for pneumonia caused by specific etiologies, in developing countries.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2012
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    ABSTRACT: To explore excess paediatric mortality after discharge from Kilifi District Hospital, Kenya, and its duration and risk factors. Hospital and demographic data were used to describe post-discharge mortality and survival probability in children aged < 15 years, by age group and clinical syndrome. Cox regression models were developed to identify risk factors. In 2004-2008, approximately 111,000 children were followed for 555,000 person-years. We analysed 14,971 discharges and 535 deaths occurring within 365 days of discharge. Mortality was higher in the post-discharge cohort than in the community cohort (age-adjusted rate ratio, RR: 7.7; 95% confidence interval, CI: 6.6-8.9) and declined little over time. An increased post-discharge mortality hazard was found in children aged < 5 years with the following: weight-for-age Z score < -4 (hazard ratio, HR: 6.5); weight-for-age Z score > -4 but < -3 (HR: 3.4); hypoxia (HR: 2.3); bacteraemia (HR: 1.8); hepatomegaly (HR: 2.3); jaundice (HR: 1.8); hospital stay > 13 days (HR: 1.8). Older age was protective (reference < 1 month): 6-23 months, HR: 0.8; 2-4 years, HR: 0.6. Children with at least one risk factor accounted for 545 (33%) of the 1655 annual discharges and for 39 (47%) of the 83 discharge-associated deaths. Hospital admission selects vulnerable children with a sustained increased risk of dying. The risk factors identified provide an empiric basis for effective outpatient follow-up.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2011 · Bulletin of the World Health Organisation
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the relationship between homestead distance to hospital and access to care and to estimate the sensitivity of hospital-based surveillance in Kilifi district, Kenya. In 2002-2006, clinical information was obtained from all children admitted to Kilifi District Hospital and linked to demographic surveillance data. Travel times to the hospital were calculated using geographic information systems and regression models were constructed to examine the relationships between travel time, cause-specific hospitalization rates and probability of death in hospital. Access to care ratios relating hospitalization rates to community mortality rates were computed and used to estimate surveillance sensitivity. The analysis included 7200 admissions (64 per 1000 child-years). Median pedestrian and vehicular travel times to hospital were 237 and 61 minutes, respectively. Hospitalization rates decreased by 21% per hour of travel by foot and 28% per half hour of travel by vehicle. Distance decay was steeper for meningitis than for pneumonia, for females than for males, and for areas where mothers had less education on average. Distance was positively associated with the probability of dying in hospital. Overall access to care ratios, which represent the probability that a child in need of hospitalization will have access to care at the hospital, were 51-58% for pneumonia and 66-70% for meningitis. In this setting, hospital utilization rates decreased and the severity of cases admitted to hospital increased as distance between homestead and hospital increased. Access to hospital care for children living in remote areas was low, particularly for those with less severe conditions. Distance decay was attenuated by increased levels of maternal education. Hospital-based surveillance underestimated pneumonia and meningitis incidence by more than 45% and 30%, respectively.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2011 · Bulletin of the World Health Organisation
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    Full-text · Article · Jan 2011 · BMC proceedings

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2010 · The Lancet Infectious Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted a vaccine coverage survey in Kilifi District, Kenya in order to identify predictors of childhood immunization. We calculated travel time to vaccine clinics and examined its relationship to immunization coverage and timeliness among the 2169 enrolled children (median age: 12.5 months). 86% had vaccine cards available, >95% had received three doses of DTP-HepB-Hib and polio vaccines and 88% of measles. Travel time did not affect vaccination coverage or timeliness. The Kenyan EPI reaches nearly all children in Kilifi and delays in vaccination are few, suggesting that vaccines will have maximal impact on child morbidity and mortality.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2010 · Vaccine
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    ABSTRACT: Few population-based studies have investigated the epidemiology of adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We aimed to determine the incidence of CAP in a population at high-risk for pneumococcal disease and to evaluate a standardized method for interpreting chest radiographs adapted from the World Health Organization paediatric chest radiograph interpretation guidelines. We reviewed radiology records at the two healthcare facilities serving the White Mountain Apache tribe to identify possible pneumonia cases > or =40 years of age. We categorized patients with clinical criteria and a physician diagnosis of pneumonia as clinical CAP and those with clinical criteria and an acute infiltrate as radiographic CAP. We identified 100 (27/1000 person-years) and 60 (16/1000 person-years) episodes of clinical and radiographic CAP, respectively. The incidence of CAP increased with age. Both radiographic and clinical CAP were serious illnesses with more than half of patients hospitalized. Our case definitions and methods may be useful for comparing data across studies and conducting vaccine trials.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2010 · Epidemiology and Infection
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    ABSTRACT: Children with sickle-cell disease are at great risk of serious infections and early mortality. Our Review investigates the association between sickle-cell disease and invasive bacterial disease among populations in Africa. We systematically searched published work extracted data on pneumonia, meningitis, and bacteraemia by sickle-cell disease status. Most studies identified lacked a control group and did not use best laboratory methods for culturing fastidious bacteria. Only seven case-control or case-cohort studies provided data on the association between invasive bacterial disease and sickle-cell disease status. For all-cause laboratory-confirmed invasive bacterial disease, the pooled odds of sickle-cell disease was 19-times greater among cases than controls. For disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, the pooled odds of sickle-cell disease was 36-times greater; and for Haemophilus influenzae type b disease it was 13-times greater.
    Full-text · Article · May 2010 · The Lancet Infectious Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Policy-makers evaluating country progress towards the Millennium Development Goals also examine trends in health inequities. Distance to health facilities is a known determinant of health care utilization and may drive inequalities in health outcomes; we aimed to investigate its effects on childhood mortality. The Epidemiological and Demographic Surveillance System in Kilifi District, Kenya, collects data on vital events and migrations in a population of 220,000 people. We used Geographic Information Systems to estimate pedestrian and vehicular travel times to hospitals and vaccine clinics and developed proportional-hazards models to evaluate the effects of travel time on mortality hazard in children less than 5 years of age, accounting for sex, ethnic group, maternal education, migrant status, rainfall and calendar time. In 2004-6, under-5 and under-1 mortality ratios were 65 and 46 per 1,000 live-births, respectively. Median pedestrian and vehicular travel times to hospital were 193 min (inter-quartile range: 125-267) and 49 min (32-72); analogous values for vaccine clinics were 47 (25-73) and 26 min (13-40). Infant and under-5 mortality varied two-fold across geographic locations, ranging from 34.5 to 61.9 per 1000 child-years and 8.8 to 18.1 per 1000, respectively. However, distance to health facilities was not associated with mortality. Hazard Ratios (HR) were 0.99 (95% CI 0.95-1.04) per hour and 1.01 (95% CI 0.95-1.08) per half-hour of pedestrian and vehicular travel to hospital, respectively, and 1.00 (95% CI 0.99-1.04) and 0.97 (95% CI 0.92-1.05) per quarter-hour of pedestrian and vehicular travel to vaccine clinics in children <5 years of age. Significant spatial variations in mortality were observed across the area, but were not correlated with distance to health facilities. We conclude that given the present density of health facilities in Kenya, geographic access to curative services does not influence population-level mortality.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2010 · BMC Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) but existing diagnostic tools have limited sensitivity and specificity. We enrolled adults undergoing chest radiography at three Indian Health Service clinics in the Southwestern United States and collected acute and convalescent serum for measurement of PsaA and PspA titres and urine for pneumococcal antigen detection. Blood and sputum cultures were obtained at the discretion of treating physicians. We compared findings in clinical and radiographic CAP patients to those in controls without CAP. Urine antigen testing showed the largest differential between CAP patients and controls (clinical CAP 13%, radiographic CAP 17%, control groups 2%). Serological results were mixed, with significant differences between CAP patients and controls for some, but not all changes in titre. Based on urine antigen and blood culture results, we estimated that 11% of clinical and 15% of radiographic CAP cases were due to pneumococcus in this population.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2010 · Epidemiology and Infection

Publication Stats

456 Citations
167.11 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012-2015
    • Agence de Médecine Préventive
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2012-2013
    • University of Oxford
      Oxford, England, United Kingdom
  • 2010-2012
    • KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme
      • Epidemiology and Demography (ED) Department
      Kilifi, Kilifi, Kenya
  • 2009-2012
    • Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
      • • International Vaccine Access Center
      • • Center for American Indian Health
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States