K. Krisciunas

Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, United States

Are you K. Krisciunas?

Claim your profile

Publications (145)371.18 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present a Hubble diagram of type II supernovae using corrected magnitudes derived only from photometry, with no input of spectral information. We use a data set from the Carnegie Supernovae Project I (CSP) for which optical and near-infrared light-curves were obtained. The apparent magnitude is corrected by two observables, one corresponding to the slope of the plateau in the $V$ band and the second a colour term. We obtain a dispersion of 0.44 mag using a combination of the $(V-i)$ colour and the $r$ band and we are able to reduce the dispersion to 0.39 mag using our golden sample. A comparison of our photometric colour method (PCM) with the standardised candle method (SCM) is also performed. The dispersion obtained for the SCM (which uses both photometric and spectroscopic information) is 0.29 mag which compares with 0.43 mag from the PCM, for the same SN sample. The construction of a photometric Hubble diagram is of high importance in the coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys, which will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will prohibit spectroscopic follow-up in the vast majority of cases, and hence methods must be deployed which can proceed using solely photometric data.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2016 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present a compilation of UBV RIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986 to 2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calan/Tololo Supernova Program (C&T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being thus shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · The Astronomical Journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We use observed UV through near IR spectra to examine whether SN 2011fe can be understood in the framework of Branch-normal SNe Ia and to examine its individual peculiarities. As a benchmark, we use a delayed-detonation model with a progenitor metallicity of Z_solar/20. We study the sensitivity of features to variations in progenitor metallicity, the outer density profile, and the distribution of radioactive nickel. The effect of metallicity variations in the progenitor have a relatively small effect on the synthetic spectra. We also find that the abundance stratification of SN 2011fe resembles closely that of a delayed detonation model with a transition density that has been fit to other Branch-normal Type Ia supernovae. At early times, the model photosphere is formed in material with velocities that are too high, indicating that the photosphere recedes too slowly or that SN 2011fe has a lower specific energy in the outer ~0.1 M_sun than does the model. We discuss several explanations for the discrepancies. Finally, we examine variations in both the spectral energy distribution and in the colors due to variations in the progenitor metallicity, which suggests that colors are only weak indicators for the progenitor metallicity, in the particular explosion model that we have studied. We do find that the flux in the U band is significantly higher at maximum light in the solar metallicity model than in the lower metallicity model and the lower metallicity model much better matches the observed spectrum.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The La Silla/QUEST Variability Survey (LSQ) and the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP II) are collaborating to discover and obtain photometric light curves for a large sample of low-redshift (z < 0.1) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The supernovae are discovered in the LSQ survey using the 1 m ESO Schmidt telescope at the La Silla Observatory with the 10 square degree QUEST camera. The follow-up photometric observations are carried out using the 1 m Swope telescope and the 2.5 m du Pont telescopes at the Las Campanas Observatory. This paper describes the survey, discusses the methods of analyzing the data, and presents the light curves for the first 31 SNe Ia obtained in the survey. The SALT 2.4 supernova light-curve fitter was used to analyze the photometric data, and the Hubble diagram for this first sample is presented. The measurement errors for these supernovae averaged 4%, and their intrinsic spread was 14%. © 2015. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present near-infrared (NIR) time-series spectroscopy, as well as complementary ultraviolet (UV), optical, and NIR data, of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) iPTF13ebh, which was discovered within two days from the estimated time of explosion. The first NIR spectrum was taken merely 2.3 days after explosion and may be the earliest NIR spectrum yet obtained of a SN Ia. The most striking features in the spectrum are several NIR C I lines, and the C I {\lambda}1.0693 {\mu}m line is the strongest ever observed in a SN Ia. Interestingly, no strong optical C II counterparts were found, even though the optical spectroscopic time series began early and is densely-cadenced. Except at the very early epochs, within a few days from the time of explosion, we show that the strong NIR C I compared to the weaker optical C II appears to be general in SNe Ia. iPTF13ebh is a fast decliner with {\Delta}m15(B) = 1.79 $\pm$ 0.01, and its absolute magnitude obeys the linear part of the width-luminosity relation. It is therefore categorized as a "transitional" event, on the fast-declining end of normal SNe Ia as opposed to subluminous/91bg-like objects. iPTF13ebh shows NIR spectroscopic properties that are distinct from both the normal and subluminous/91bg-like classes, bridging the observed characteristics of the two classes. These NIR observations suggest composition and density of the inner core similar to that of 91bg-like events, and a deep reaching carbon burning layer not observed in slower declining SNe Ia. There is also a substantial difference between the explosion times inferred from the early-time light curve and the velocity evolution of the Si II {\lambda}0.6355 {\mu}m line, implying a long dark phase of ~ 4 days.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015
  • Source
    Kevin Krisciunas · Hektor Monteiro · Wilton Dias
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present BV and u'g'r'i' CCD photometry of the central region of NGC 2482. We also present BVu'g' CCD photometry of five clusters that have been poorly studied in the past: Ruprecht 42, Ruprecht 51, Ruprecht 153, Ruprecht 154; and AH03 J0748-26.9, which to our knowledge has not been studied before. Using a global optimization technique that eliminates much of the subjectivity previously inherent in main sequence fitting studies, we obtain values of the distances, ages, and metallicities of the clusters, with robust estimates of the uncertainties of these fundamental parameters. Four of our clusters are less than ~1.3 kpc beyond the Sun's distance from the Galactic Center and have essentially solar metallicity. The metallicities of those clusters more distant from the Galactic Center are consistent with a 0.3 dex step to lower [Fe/H] found in other studies.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present optical and ultraviolet (UV) photometry and spectra of the very nearby and highly reddened supernova (SN) 2014J in M82 obtained with the Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Comparison of the UVOT grism spectra of SN~2014J with Hubble Space Telescope observations of SN2011fe or UVOT grism spectra of SN~2012fr are consistent with an extinction law with a low value of R_V~1.4. The high reddening causes the detected photon distribution in the broadband UV filters to have a much longer effective wavelength than for an unreddened SN. The light curve evolution is consistent with this shift and does not show a flattening due to photons being scattered back into the line of sight. The light curve shapes and color evolution are inconsistent with a contribution scattered into the line of sight by circumstellar dust. We conclude that most or all of the high reddening must come from interstellar dust. We show that even for a single dust composition, there is not a unique reddening law caused by circumstellar scattering. Rather, when considering scattering from a time-variable source, we confirm earlier studies that the reddening law is a function of the dust geometry, column density, and epoch. We also show how an assumed geometry of dust as a foreground sheet in mixed stellar/dust systems will lead to a higher inferred R_V. Rather than assuming the dust around SNe is peculiar, SNe may be useful probes of the interstellar reddening laws in other galaxies.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present well-sampled UBVRIJHK photometry of SN 2002fk starting 12 days before maximum light through 122 days after peak brightness, along with a series of 15 optical spectra from –4 to +95 days since maximum. Our observations show the presence of C II lines in the early-time spectra of SN 2002fk, expanding at 11,000 km s–1 and persisting until 8 days past maximum light with a velocity of ~9000 km s–1. SN 2002fk is characterized by a small velocity gradient of km s–1 day–1, possibly caused by an off-center explosion with the ignition region oriented toward the observer. The connection between the viewing angle of an off-center explosion and the presence of C II in the early-time spectrum suggests that the observation of C II could be also due to a viewing angle effect. Adopting the Cepheid distance to NGC 1309 we provide the first H 0 value based on near-infrared (near-IR) measurements of a Type Ia supernova (SN) between 63.0 ± 0.8 (±3.4 systematic) and 66.7 ± 1.0 (±3.5 systematic) km s–1 Mpc–1, depending on the absolute magnitude/decline rate relationship adopted. It appears that the near-IR yields somewhat lower (6%-9%) H 0 values than the optical. It is essential to further examine this issue by (1) expanding the sample of high-quality near-IR light curves of SNe in the Hubble flow, and (2) increasing the number of nearby SNe with near-IR SN light curves and precise Cepheid distances, which affords the promise to deliver a more precise determination of H 0.
    Preview · Article · Jun 2014 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present photospheric-phase observations of LSQ12gdj, a slowly declining, UV-bright Type Ia supernova. Classified well before maximum light, LSQ12gdj has extinction-corrected absolute magnitude MB = −19.8, and pre-maximum spectroscopic evolution similar to SN 1991T and the super-Chandrasekhar-mass SN 2007if. We use ultraviolet photometry from Swift, ground-based optical photometry, and corrections from a near-infrared photometric template to construct the bolometric (1600–23 800 Å) light curve out to 45 d past B-band maximum light. We estimate that LSQ12gdj produced 0.96 ± 0.07 M⊙ of 56Ni, with an ejected mass near or slightly above the Chandrasekhar mass. As much as 27 per cent of the flux at the earliest observed phases, and 17 per cent at maximum light, is emitted bluewards of 3300 Å. The absence of excess luminosity at late times, the cutoff of the spectral energy distribution bluewards of 3000 Å and the absence of narrow line emission and strong Na i D absorption all argue against a significant contribution from ongoing shock interaction. However, ∼10 per cent of LSQ12gdj's luminosity near maximum light could be produced by the release of trapped radiation, including kinetic energy thermalized during a brief interaction with a compact, hydrogen-poor envelope (radius <1013 cm) shortly after explosion; such an envelope arises generically in double-degenerate merger scenarios.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Among Type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) exist a class of overluminous objects whose ejecta mass is inferred to be larger than the canonical Chandrasekhar mass. We present and discuss the UV/optical photometric light curves, colors, absolute magnitudes, and spectra of three candidate Super-Chandrasekhar mass SNe--2009dc, 2011aa, and 2012dn--observed with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. The light curves are at the broad end for SNe Ia, with the light curves of SN~2011aa being amongst the broadest ever observed. We find all three to have very blue colors which may provide a means of excluding these overluminous SNe from cosmological analysis, though there is some overlap with the bluest of "normal" SNe Ia. All three are overluminous in their UV absolute magnitudes compared to normal and broad SNe Ia, but SNe 2011aa and 2012dn are not optically overluminous compared to normal SNe Ia. The integrated luminosity curves of SNe 2011aa and 2012dn in the UVOT range (1600-6000 Angstroms) are only half as bright as SN~2009dc, implying a smaller 56Ni yield. While not enough to strongly affect the bolometric flux, the early time mid-UV flux makes a significant contribution at early times. The strong spectral features in the mid-UV spectra of SNe 2009dc and 2012dn suggest a higher temperature and lower opacity to be the cause of the UV excess rather than a hot, smooth blackbody from shock interaction. Further work is needed to determine the ejecta and 56Ni masses of SNe 2011aa and 2012dn and fully explain their high UV luminosities.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2014 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 magnitudes, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the 'plateau' stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply 'SNII' with an s2 value giving the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase, indicating its morphological type.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present the first analysis of Type Ia supernovae found by the La Silla-QUEST (LSQ) survey and followed-up by the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) using the 1m SWOPE telescope. LSQ uses the 1m ESO Schmidt telescope on La Silla with a wide-band filter (4000-7000 Angstrom) to search for transient events with the aim of discovering and obtaining lightcurves for 500 low-redshift (z<0.1) supernovae over the 5-year lifetime of the project. The supernovae we present here are followed in a number of different filters, selected from BVugri, and will contribute towards the goal of a well-studied local sample for cosmology.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report the spectroscopic classification of LSQ13dsm using a near-infrared spectrum (range 800-2500 nm) obtained on Jan 1.21 UT with the FoldedPort Infrared Echellette (FIRE) spectrograph on the 6.5-m Magellan Baade Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. The near-infrared spectrum shows that LSQ13dsm is a young type Ia supernova at approximately z=0.04.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014
  • Source
    Kevin Krisciunas
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ptolemy's model of the Moon's motion implied that its distance varies by nearly a factor of two, implying that its angular size should also vary by nearly a factor of two. We present an analysis of 100 naked eye observations of the Moon's angular size obtained over 1145 days, showing regular variations of at least 3 arc minutes. Thus, ancient astronomers could have shown that a key implication of Ptolemy's model was wrong. In modern times we attribute the variation of distance of the Moon to the combined effect of the ellipticity of the Moon's orbit and the perturbing effect of the Sun on the Earth-Moon system. We show graphically how this affects the ecliptic longitudes and radial distance of the Moon. The longitude and distance "anomalies" are correlated with the Moon's phase. This is illustrated without any complex equations or geometry.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2013
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is the first release of optical spectroscopic data of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project including 604 previously unpublished spectra of 93 SNe Ia. The observations cover a range of phases from 12 days before to over 150 days after the time of B-band maximum light. With the addition of 228 near-maximum spectra from the literature we study the diversity among SNe Ia in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, spectroscopic parameters are employed such as expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts, and pseudo-equivalent widths (pW). The values of those parameters at maximum light are obtained for 78 objects, thus providing a characterization of SNe Ia that may help to improve our understanding of the properties of the exploding systems and the thermonuclear flame propagation. Two objects, namely SNe 2005M and 2006is, stand out from the sample by showing peculiar Si II and S II velocities but otherwise standard velocities for the rest of the ions. We further study the correlations between spectroscopic and photometric parameters such as light-curve decline rate and color. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the pW of Si II absorption features are very good indicators of light-curve decline rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that parameters such as pW2(SiII4130) and pW6(SiII5972) provide precise calibrations of the peak B-band luminosity with dispersions of ~0.15 mag. In the search for a secondary parameter in the calibration of peak luminosity for SNe Ia, we find a ~2--3-sigma correlation between B-band Hubble residuals and the velocity at maximum light of S II and Si II lines.
    Full-text · Article · May 2013 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: CBET 3385 available at Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2013
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report that an optical spectrum (range 359-960 nm) of J09063070-7549015 obtained on January 7.17 UT with the Las Campanas 2.5-m du Pont telescope (+WFCCD) shows that it is a type Ia supernova approximately a week before maximum brightness. Cross correlation with a library of supernova spectra via the Supernova Identification tool (Blondin and Tonry 2007, ApJ 1024, 666) yields very good matches with many normal type Ia supernovae at 6 to 11 days prior to maximum.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2013
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present previously unpublished photometry of supernovae 2003gs and 2003hv. Using spectroscopically-derived corrections to the U-band photometry, we reconcile U-band light curves made from imagery with the Cerro Tololo 0.9-m, 1.3-m and Las Campanas 1-m telescopes. Previously, such light curves showed a 0.4 mag spread at one month after maximum light. This gives us hope that a set of corrected ultraviolet light curves of nearby objects can contribute to the full utilization of rest frame U-band data of supernovae at redshift ~0.3 to 0.8. As pointed out recently by Kessler et al. in the context of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey supernova search, if we take the published U-band photometry of nearby Type Ia supernovae at face value, there is a 0.12 mag U-band anomaly in the distance moduli of higher redshift objects. This anomaly led the Sloan survey to eliminate from their analyses all photometry obtained in the rest frame U-band. The Supernova Legacy Survey eliminated observer frame U-band photometry, which is to say nearby objects observed in the U-band, but they used photometry of high redshift objects no matter in which band the photons were emitted.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2012 · The Astronomical Journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We describe a new astrophysical version of a cell-based adaptive mesh refinement code ALLA for reactive flow fluid dynamic simulations, including a new implementation of α-network nuclear kinetics, and present preliminary results of first three-dimensional simulations of incomplete carbon-oxygen detonation in Type Ia Supernovae.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2012
  • Source
    Kevin Krisciunas
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We review some results of the past 12 years derived from optical and infrared photometry of Type Ia supernovae. A combination of optical and infrared photometry allows us to determine accurately the extinction along the line of sight. The resulting distance measurements are much more accurate than can be obtained from optical data alone. Type Ia supernovae are very nearly standard candles in the near-infrared. Accurate supernova distances, coupled with other observational data available at present, allow us to determine the matter density in the universe and lead to evidence for the existence of Dark Energy. We can now address some questions on the grandest scale such as, "What is the ultimate Fate of the universe?"
    Preview · Article · May 2012

Publication Stats

5k Citations
371.18 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007-2016
    • Texas A&M University
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      College Station, Texas, United States
  • 2014
    • University of Santiago, Chile
      • Departamento de Economía
      CiudadSantiago, Santiago, Chile
  • 2008-2014
    • Carnegie Institution for Science
      • Department of Terrestrial Magnetism
      Washington, West Virginia, United States
  • 2011
    • University of Chicago
      • Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 2001-2008
    • University of Notre Dame
      • Department of Physics
      South Bend, Indiana, United States
  • 1998-2008
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Astronomy
      Seattle, WA, United States
  • 2002-2007
    • National Optical Astronomy Observatory
      Tucson, Arizona, United States
  • 2004
    • University of California, Berkeley
      • Department of Astronomy
      Berkeley, California, United States