Rudolf R. Sinkovics

Lappeenranta University of Technology, Villmanstrand, South Karelia, Finland

Are you Rudolf R. Sinkovics?

Claim your profile

Publications (117)67.76 Total impact

  • Yong Kyu Lew · Rudolf R. Sinkovics · Mo Yamin · Zaheer Khan
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the information age, the firm’s performance hinges on combining partners’ specialist knowledge to achieve value co-creation. Combining knowledge from different specialties could be a costly process in the international technology alliances (ITAs) context. We argue that the combination of different specializations requires the development of ‘trans-specialization understanding’ (TSU) instead of the internalization of partners’ specialist knowledge. This paper examines the extent to which inter-firm governance in ITAs shapes TSU, and whether the development of TSU is endangered by cultural distance. We hypothesize that relational governance, product modularity, and cultural distance influence TSU development, which in turn influences firm performance. We collected data from 110 non-equity ITAs between software and hardware firms participating in the mobile device sector. We analyzed the data using partial least squares path modeling. Our findings suggest that TSU largely depends on product modularity and relational governance in alliances. However, while cultural distance negatively moderates the path from relational governance to TSU, it has no effect on the relationship between product modularity and TSU. Based on this, we conclude that product modularity can substitute for relational governance when strong relational norms are not well-developed in international alliances. Thus, cultural distance does not invariably amount to a liability in ITAs.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of International Business Studies
  • Rudolf R. Sinkovics · Christopher Richardson · Yong Kyu Lew
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A core component of International Business (IB) postgraduate programs around the world is the master’s dissertation, which requires students to produce a written document, typically around 20,000 words in length, based on empirical research. While the dissertation is given considerable importance in such programs, often accounting for more than a quarter of a candidate’s final grade, the effectiveness of the dissertation in delivering outcomes remains largely unknown. This paper addresses this shortcoming by providing an empirical understanding of the perceived usefulness and value of master’s-level dissertations and evaluating their impact on the personal and intellectual development of students. Findings demonstrate the unique ability of the dissertation to enhance student employability, both for scientifically interested and deep learners as well as for functional learners.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Teaching in International Business
  • Source
    Yong Kyu Lew · Rudolf R. Sinkovics

    Full-text · Dataset · Dec 2015
  • Source
    Zaheer Khan · Yong Kyu Lew · Rudolf R. Sinkovics
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose – This paper aims to explore inter-organizational linkages and the extent of technology transfer and develop propositions related to the linkages, technology transfer and upgrading of local suppliers in developing economies. Design/methodology/approach – The authors conduct a literature review and 50 exploratory interviews with senior managers and policymakers in the automotive parts industry of Pakistan. Findings – The data revealed that three major international joint ventures (IJVs) established in the automotive industry of Pakistan have created significant vertical linkages. However, advanced high-level technology transfer has not actually taken place due to the following reasons: IJV parents are reluctant to engage in technology transfer, there is limited support from local government and local suppliers exhibit limited improvement in their innovation capability. The vertical linkage creation and low-medium technology transfer contributes to incremental product upgrading of the local suppliers, rather than their process upgrading and insertion into the global value chain (GVC). Research limitations/implications – This research looked at technology interactions between IJVs and local tier-1 suppliers (not tier 2 and tier 3) in Pakistan’s automotive industry. This paper’ illustrative case indicates what is required for local suppliers in developing economies to make breakthrough upgrades of their products and processes through their vertical linkages with foreign-owned indigenous firms. Originality/value – Unlike prior research, the authors investigate the role of inter-organizational linkages and the extent of technology transfer, and how these affect local suppliers’ product/process upgrading in the local value chain. Highlighting the illusion of upgrading in the GVC, this paper reveals the difficulties involved in upgrading suppliers’ positions (e.g. insertion and functional upgrading in the GVC) through their vertical linkages with foreign multinational enterprises in developing economies. The illusion of upgrading sheds a rather disappointing light on the position of developing country supplier vis-à-vis their powerful international partners.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Critical Perspectives on International Business
  • Source
    Ruey-Jer “Bryan” Jean · Rudolf R. Sinkovics · Daekwan Kim · Yong Kyu Lew
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Key account management plays a pivotal role for managers and practitioners in the maintenance of successful customer-supplier relationships. Yet, little is known conceptually or empirically about how suppliers can move beyond market scanning and develop international key account management capabilities in international customer-supplier relationships.Drawing from the dynamic capability literature, we develop and test a model of antecedents and performance implications of suppliers' international key account management capabilities. In addition, the moderating effects of cultural distance and supplier information technology advancement are examined.An analysis of 246 Taiwanese electronics suppliers reveals that market scanning and trust are recognized as critical to the development of suppliers' international key account management capabilities. Moreover, these key account management capabilities can facilitate suppliers' market performance. Importantly, cultural distance and suppliers' IT advancement moderate the impact of market scanning on the development of key account management in international exchange relationships.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · International Business Review
  • Source
    Noemi Sinkovics · Rudolf R. Sinkovics · Samia Ferdous Hoque · Laszlo Czaban

    Preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Critical Perspectives on International Business
  • Mo Yamin · Rudolf R. Sinkovics

    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Critical Perspectives on International Business
  • Source
    Heinz Tüselmann · Rudolf R. Sinkovics · Grigory Pishchulov
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The question of how to assess research outputs published in journals is now a global concern for academics. Numerous journal ratings and rankings exist, some featuring perceptual and peer-review-based journal ranks, some focusing on objective information related to citations, some using a combination of the two. This research consolidates existing journal rankings into an up-to-date and comprehensive list. Existing approaches to determining journal rankings are significantly advanced with the application of a new classification approach, ‘random forests’, and data envelopment analysis. As a result, a fresh look at a publication’s place in the global research community is offered. While our approach is applicable to all management and business journals, we specifically exemplify the relative position of ‘operations research, management science, production and operations management’ journals within the broader management field, as well as within their own subject domain.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Omega
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine operational-level implementation issues regarding mergers and acquisitions (M&As) in general, and resource combination and integration at the functional marketing level in particular. Design/methodology/approach – The paper introduces four factors (i.e. collaboration, interaction, marketing synergy, and the realignment of marketing resources) that support successful M&A marketing integration and enhance overall M&A performance. Findings – The results indicate that marketing synergy and the realignment of marketing resources contribute significantly to the extent of integration. At the same time, the authors find a significant but negative relationship between the interaction dimension and the speed of integration. Originality/value – The cultural integration of firms that feature different management styles and organizational cultures has been recognized as a particularly challenging aspect of cross-border M&As. This study explains factors that contribute to effective marketing integration in M&As. Keywords Mergers and acquisitions, Marketing integration Paper type Research paper
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · International Marketing Review
  • Zaheer Khan · Yong Kyu Lew · Rudolf R. Sinkovics
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We investigate how international joint ventures (IJVs) established in emerging economies help their local suppliers with technological knowledge transfer. Data from 50 Pakistani-owned Tier 1 suppliers, three of the major assemblers, and policy makers in the Ministry of Industries and Production in Pakistan is collected. Findings suggest that, in the context of the Pakistani emerging economy, IJVs can also play a critical role as the boundary spanners of knowledge transfer. Local suppliers are linked with their global suppliers' networks through associational learning. Social capital between the IJVs and the local component suppliers and the IJVs' willingness to initiate a knowledge transfer dialogue among local and global Tier 1 suppliers are critically important factors that enable this transfer.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015
  • Thomas Salzberger · Rudolf Sinkovics · Hartmut Holzmüller
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cultural diversity can impede the standardization of marketing programs and increase the complexity of marketing research efforts (see Assael, 1992; Cateora, 1996; Douglas and Craig, 1992). In the context of marketing research, the cross-cultural comparability of research results is a particularly thorny topic which is frequently ignored by researchers. Yet, neglecting cross-cultural comparability issues may render marketing research input for international marketing decisions meaningless (Manrai and Manrai, 1996).
    No preview · Chapter · Jan 2015
  • Ruey-Jer “Bryan” Jean · Rudolf R. Sinkovics · Daekwan Kim
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The literature suggests that advances in information and communication technologies have been a major driver of the restructuring of multinational enterprises and their cross-border supply chain management. However, the role of information technology usage for collaboration and its antecedents and performance implications in cross-border exchange relationships have not been clearly specified. In response to this claim, this study examines the determinants of electronic collaboration (E-collaboration) and its outcomes for suppliers with regard to their international customers. Drawing on an empirical foundation of 240 Taiwanese-based electronics equipment manufacturers, we test the effects of technological, organizational and environmental dimensions on E-collaboration and its impact on relationship performance in international exchange. The findings on the pertinence of E-collaboration in international customer–supplier relationships are presented and discussed.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Information & Management
  • Source
    Noemi Sinkovics · Rudolf R. Sinkovics · Mo Yamin
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an exploratory study of how social value creation and business models may be interrelated in the context of the bottom of the pyramid (BOP) business formation. We develop our analysis around five case studies of actual businesses set up in rural India by people in the BOP. We attempt to draw implications from the performance of the business models in the BOP for what MNE strategies of engagement with the BOP may learn from the processes we analysed.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2014 · International Business Review
  • Source
    Rudolf R. Sinkovics · Mo Yamin · Khalid Nadvi · Yingying Zhang Zhang

    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · International Business Review
  • Source
    Grigory Pishchulov · Heinz Tüselmann · Rudolf R Sinkovics
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The question of how to assess research outputs published in journals is now a global concern for academics. Numerous journal ratings and rankings exist, some featuring perceptual and peer-review-based journal ranks, some focusing on objective information related to citations, some using a combination of the two. This research consolidates existing journal rankings into an up-to-date and comprehensive list. Existing approaches to determining journal rankings are significantly advanced with the application of a new classification approach, ‘random forests’, and data envelopment analysis. As a result, a fresh look at a publication’s place in the global research community is offered. While our approach is applicable to all management and business journals, we specifically exemplify the relative position of ‘operations research, management science, production and operations management’ journals within the broader management field, as well as within their own subject domain.
    Full-text · Technical Report · Jun 2014
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Does affiliation with a business group enhance a firm's performance? What is the potential effect of this affiliation especially in declining economic periods? The literature provides contradictory results on this proposition. In this study, the authors explore the role of business group affiliation as a firm-specific factor and its impact in different environments, adding to our understanding of the firm-growth phenomenon. The empirical context is a large sample of firms registered in the United Kingdom, drawn from the FAME database. The analysis provides evidence for significant impact of business group affiliations on firm growth, especially during adverse economic conditions. However, the business group–firm growth relationship is moderated by firm-specific characteristics (e.g. firm size), and group specific characteristics (e.g. type of ownership and country of origin). Regarding the latter, it is specifically revealed that the impact of group affiliation is not uniform across all countries, a possibility that has been ignored in the international business literature. Among its contributions, this research introduces a novel typology of firms in growing and declining industries. The proposed typology enables us to advance propositions with respect to varying trajectories of business affiliations for firms of different size and nationality/region of origin of business groups.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2014 · International Business Review
  • Mo Yamin · Rudolf R. Sinkovics
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose - This chapter revisits the paper by Yamin and Sinkovics (2009) on the paradoxical relationship between MNE current strategies and economic development. There is evidence that positive developmental impacts of FDI flows are conditional on high levels of human capital and thus on the existence of 'good' infrastructure in recipient countries. Design/methodology/approach - The chapter makes a conceptual contribution and critically evaluates the key points made in the Yamin and Sinkovics (2009) paper. Findings - The build-up of infrastructure and enhancement of domestic capabilities are important underpinnings of sustainable development. 'Good' infrastructure, especially basic social infrastructure, is the rock on which otherwise marginalised individuals, groups and country governments can build capabilities. Research implications - The chapter draws attention to the 'prisoner dilemma' nature of the relationship between MNEs and host governments. Dominant MNE strategies in LDCs create a low payoff for both parties. To proceed towards mutually beneficial outcomes in the MNE-LDC relationship, credible and sustained co-operation between the parties are necessary. Research in the area of mutual value creation has only just emerged in the domain of IB. Practical implications - Progressing towards 'sustainability' requires that MNE managers are advised to develop a global capability in 'social embeddedness'. LDCs have great potential of becoming strategic markets and important sites for new product and service development. To pursue these opportunities requires credible and sustained commitment to mutual value creation. Originality/value - This chapter shows that the relationship between MNE strategies and economic development is a contested one. The paper by Yamin and Sinkovics (2009) was one of the first in the domain of IB to suggest that developmental impacts of FDI are contingent on the existence of good infrastructure in recipient countries.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Progress in International Business Research
  • Ruey-Jer “Bryan” Jean · Rudolf R. Sinkovics · Thomas P. Hiebaum
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Globalization drives firms to develop product innovation through their global supply chains. While innovations generated by supply channel members, as opposed to individual partners, are playing an increasingly important role in the success of all supply chain partners, there has been limited research on how supply chain relationships cultivate the process of such innovation generation, particularly in emerging markets. Correspondingly, this study explores how multinational suppliers can develop adaptive product innovation to create competitive advantage in emerging markets. Drawing on the knowledge-based view and transaction cost economics, this study investigates the influence of supplier involvement and other factors on supplier innovation and performance. The results of a survey of 170 multinational automobile suppliers in China provide support for most of the hypotheses. Specifically, supplier involvement in codesign has an inverted U-shaped relationship with product innovation. Furthermore, knowledge protection, trust, and technological uncertainty are all found to drive greater product innovation. In addition, the institutional environment moderates the effect of product innovation on performance. Overall, this study enhances our understanding of how MNEs can acquire local knowledge and develop adaptive products in emerging markets.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Journal of Product Innovation Management

  • No preview · Book · Jan 2014
  • Mo Yamin · Rudolf R. Sinkovics · Christopher Richardson
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper examines two aspects of the internationalisation of innovation in Finnish multinational companies, the growing innovativeness of foreign subsidiaries ('creative subsidiaries') and the phenomenon of 'cross-fertilisation', between R&D labs in Finland and those in foreign subsidiaries, in the innovative process of Finnish MNEs. We review existing literature pertaining to innovation in multinational enterprises and the growing capability of foreign subsidiaries to undertake innovation. Consistent with the general thrust of the literature we develop and examine two hypotheses relating to subsidiary innovation and cross-fertilisation between subsidiaries and the parent for 30 Finnish MNEs between the years 1975-1995, employing patent data from the US patent office. Our findings provide support for the hypotheses. We conclude by pointing out the limitations of the current study and deriving implications from our findings for future research.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · European J of International Management

Publication Stats

3k Citations
67.76 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014-2015
    • Lappeenranta University of Technology
      Villmanstrand, South Karelia, Finland
    • Technische Universität Dortmund
      • Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences
      Dortmund, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2003-2015
    • The University of Manchester
      • Manchester Business School (MBS)
      Manchester, England, United Kingdom
  • 1999-2007
    • SH-Gen Wiesbaden
      Wiesbaden, Hesse, Germany
  • 2006
    • IMSA Amsterdam
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2005
    • Universität Heidelberg
      Heidelburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 1999-2003
    • Hochschule Mannheim
      Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 1998-2000
    • Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien
      • Institute of International Marketing Management
      Wien, Vienna, Austria
  • 1997
    • Klinikum Stuttgart
      Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany