Shibani Pati

Blood Systems Research Institute, San Francisco, California, United States

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Publications (68)262.83 Total impact


  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Intravenous administration of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to reduce blood brain barrier compromise and improve neurocognition following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). These effects occur in the absence of engraftment and differentiation of these cells in the injured brain. Recent studies have shown that soluble factors produced by MSCs mediate a number of the therapeutic effects. In the present study, we sought to determine if intravenous administration of MSCs (IV-MSCs) could enhance hippocampal neurogenesis following TBI. Our results demonstrate that IV-MSC treatment attenuates loss of neural stem cells and promotes hippocampal neurogenesis in TBI injured mice. As Wnt signaling has been implicated in neurogenesis, we measured circulating Wnt levels in serum following IV-MSC administration and found a significant increase in Wnt3a. Concurrent with this increase, we detected increased activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, IV recombinant Wnt3a treatment provided neuroprotection, promoted neurogenesis and improved neurocognitive function in TBI injured mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for Wnt3a in the therapeutic potential of MSCs and identify Wnt3a as a potential stand-alone therapy or as part of a combination therapeutic strategy for the treatment of TBI. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Stem Cells
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    Full-text · Dataset · Oct 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Trauma is a leading cause of death in both military and civilian populations worldwide. While medical advances have improved the overall morbidity and mortality often associated with trauma, additional research and innovative advancements in therapeutic interventions are needed to optimize patient outcomes. Cell-based therapies present a novel opportunity to improve trauma and critical care at both the acute and chronic phases that often follow injury. While this field is still in its infancy, animal and human studies suggest that stem cells may hold great promise for the treatment of brain and spinal cord injuries, organ injuries, and extremity injuries such as those caused by orthopedic trauma, burns, and critical limb ischemia. However, barriers in the translation of cell therapies that include regulatory obstacles, challenges in manufacturing and clinical trial design, and a lack of funding are critical areas in need of development. In 2015, the Department of Defense (DoD) Combat Casualty Care Research Program (CCCRP) held a joint military-civilian meeting as part of its effort to inform the research community about this field and allow for effective planning and programmatic decisions regarding research and development. The objective of this paper is to provide a "state of the science" review regarding cellular therapies in trauma and critical care and to provide a foundation from which the potential of this emerging field can be harnessed to mitigate outcomes in critically ill trauma patients.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Shock (Augusta, Ga.)
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    ABSTRACT: We have shown in a rodent model of hemorrhagic shock (HS) that fresh frozen plasma (FFP) reduces lung inflammation and injury which are correlated with restitution of syndecan-1. Since the gut is believed to contribute to distant organ injury and inflammation after shock, the current study sought to determine if the protective effects of plasma would extend to the gut and to elucidate the contribution of syndecan-1 to this protective effect. We also examined the potential role of TNFα, and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)-17, both intestinal sheddases of syndecan-1. Wild-type (WT) and syndecan-1 (KO) mice were subjected to HS followed by resuscitation with lactated ringers (LR) or FFP and compared to shock alone and shams. Small bowel and blood were obtained after 3 hours for analysis of mucosal injury and inflammation and TNFα and ADAM-17 protein expression and activity. After HS, gut injury and inflammation were significantly increased compared to shams. Resuscitation with LR decreased both injury and inflammation which were further lessened by FFP. KO mice displayed worsened gut injury and inflammation after HS compared to WT mice, and LR and FFP equivalently inhibited injury and inflammation. Both systemic and intestinal TNFα and ADAM-17 followed similar trends, with increases after HS, reduction by LR, and a further decrease by FFP in WT but not KO mice. In conclusion, FFP decreased gut injury and inflammation after hemorrhagic shock, an effect that was abrogated in syndecan-1 mice. Plasma also decreased TNFα and ADAM-17, representing a potential mechanistic link to its protection via syndecan-1.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Shock (Augusta, Ga.)
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    ABSTRACT: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to have potent therapeutic effects in a number of disorders including Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). However, the molecular mechanism(s) underlying these protective effects are largely unknown. Herein we demonstrate that Tissue Inhibitor of Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP3), a soluble protein released by MSCs, is neuroprotective and enhances neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth in vitro. In vivo in a murine model of TBI, intravenous (IV) recombinant TIMP3 enhances dendritic outgrowth and abrogates loss of hippocampal neural stem cells and mature neurons. Mechanistically we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo that TIMP3-mediated neuroprotection is critically dependent on activation of the Akt-mTORC1 pathway. In support of the neuroprotective effect of TIMP3 we find that intravenous delivery of recombinant TIMP3 attenuates deficits in hippocampal-dependent neurocognition. Taken together our data strongly suggest that TIMP3 has direct neuroprotective effects that can mitigate the deleterious effects associated with TBI, an area with few if any therapeutic options. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Stem Cells

  • No preview · Conference Paper · Jun 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Plasma can be manufactured by multiple methods. Few studies have compared quality parameters between plasma products that may affect efficacy and safety. Four different plasma products were analyzed to include fresh frozen plasma (FFP), liquid plasma (LP), solvent detergent plasma (SDP), and a spray-dried, solvent detergent-treated plasma (SD-SDP) at multiple time points of storage. Parameters measured included red blood cell, platelet, and white blood cell counts; microparticle phenotypes; thrombin generation; and thrombelastography. These parameters were compared in 10 samples of each product. SDP and SD-SDP contained the smallest number of residual cells compared with FFP and LP. Platelets were the most common residual cell in all products and were highest in LP. FFP contained the greatest number of residual red blood cells. Total microparticle counts were elevated in LP and FFP compared with SDP and SD-SDP. Cell-derived microparticles in both LP and FFP were mostly platelet in origin. Microparticle counts in SDP and SD-SDP were negligible. Thrombelastography results demonstrated similar thrombin, fibrinogen, and platelet function on Day 28 LP compared with Day 5 thawed FFP. Thrombin generation assays revealed that the total, lag time to, and peak thrombin formation were higher in SDP and SD-SDP compared with FFP and LP. All parameters in FFP and LP products were characterized by a large degree of variability. The differences in cellular, microparticle, and functional hemostatic parameters measured between plasma products have the potential to affect efficacy and safety. Further study is needed to elucidate the potential immune effects of the cellular and microparticle differences noted as well as the clinical implications of altered thrombin generation kinetics in SD products.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Cytotherapy

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Cytotherapy

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Cytotherapy
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    ABSTRACT: In retrospective and prospective observational studies, fresh frozen plasma (FFP) has been associated with a survival benefit in massively transfused trauma patients. A dry plasma product, such as spray-dried plasma (SDP), offers logistical advantages over FFP. Recent studies on FFP have demonstrated that FFP modulates systemic vascular stability and inflammation. The effect of SDP on these measures has not been previously examined. This study compares SDP with FFP using in vitro assays of endothelial function and in vivo assays of lung injury using a mouse model of hemorrhagic shock (HS) and trauma. FFP, SDP, and lactated Ringer's (LR) solution were compared in vitro using assays of endothelial cell (EC) permeability, cytokine production and content, gene expression, as well as tight and adherens junction stability. All resuscitation products were also compared in a murine model of HS. Mean arterial pressures and physiologic measures were assessed. Pulmonary vascular permeability was measured using tagged dextran. Lung tissues were stained for CD68, VE-cadherin, and occludin. Treatment of ECs with FFP and SDP, but not LR, preserved the integrity of EC monolayers in vitro and resulted in similar EC gene expression patterns and cytokine/growth factor production. FFP and SDP also reduced HS-induced pulmonary vascular permeability in vivo to the same extent. In mice with HS, mean arterial pressures and base excess were corrected by both FFP and SDP to levels observed in sham-treated mice. Treatment after HS with FFP and SDP but not LR solution reduce alveolar wall thickening, leukocyte infiltration, and the breakdown of EC junctions, as measured by staining for VE-cadherin, and occludin. Both FFP and SDP similarly modulate pulmonary vascular integrity, permeability, and inflammation in vitro and in vivo in a murine model of HS and trauma.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
  • Rosemary A Kozar · Shibani Pati

    No preview · Article · Jun 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Background The endothelial glycocalyx layer (EGL) is a key regulator of vascular permeability, cell adhesion, and inflammation. The EGL is primarily composed of syndecan-1, hyaluronic acid (HA), heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS). While many studies have observed increased shedding of syndecan-1 during hemorrhagic shock, little is known about the shedding of other EGL components, and their effects on altered permeability and coagulation. We characterized shedding of all four primary components of the EGL, as well as the plasma’s effect on permeability and thrombin generation in a cohort of trauma patients. Methods Plasma samples were collected from 5 healthy consented volunteers and 22 severely injured trauma patients upon admission to the emergency department. ELISA assays were performed to quantify shed HA, HS, CS and syndecan-1 in plasma. A colloid osmometer and Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) system were used to measure plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP) and cell permeability, respectively. Thrombin generation was measured using a calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT). Initial vital signs, routine laboratory values, and injury severity scores (ISS) were recorded. Non-parametric statistical tests were used to compare differences between groups. Results We observed increased shedding of all four proteins in trauma patient plasma compared to healthy controls: 31.7 vs. 21.2 U/L of CS, 175.8 vs. 121.9 ng/ml of HS, 946.7 vs. 618.6 ng/ml of HA and 245.8 vs. 31.6 ng/ml of syndecan-1 (all p < 0.05). Patients with low plasma COP (≤16 mmHg) had significantly increased syndecan-1 and HA compared to those with normal COP, which corresponded to increased cell permeability via ECIS. CS and HS did not vary between COP groups. Lastly, patients with low COP displayed reduced peak thrombin generation of less than 250 nM on average (p < 0.05). Conclusions Glycocalyx components were shed more in trauma patients compared to healthy controls in this cohort. However, only syndecan-1 and HA shedding were significantly higher in patients with reduced plasma COP. Thrombin generation was impaired in patients with low plasma COP. These data suggest that low plasma COP correlates well to glycocalyx degradation and thrombin loss following trauma, which consequently affect permeability and coagulation.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Translational Medicine
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    Full-text · Dataset · Mar 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Mounting evidence highlighting the benefits of hemostatic resuscitation has led to a renewed interest in whole blood (WB) and reconstitutedWB(RWB). However, few data exist to characterize the clotting profiles of these variants. This study characterizes banked WBvariants and RWB in standard 1:1:1 and 2:1:1 transfusion ratios of packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, and platelets (PLTs). We hypothesized that the global hemostatic profile of 1:1:1 RWB is superior to 2:1:1 RWB and that PLT-modified WB (MWB) is superior to 1:1:1 RWB.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Thawed fresh frozen plasma (TP) is a preferred plasma product for resuscitation but can only be used for up to 5 days after thawing. Never-frozen, liquid plasma (LQP) is approved for up to 26 days when stored at 1°C to 6°C. We have previously shown that TP repairs tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)-induced permeability in human endothelial cells (ECs). We hypothesized that stored LQP repairs permeability as effectively as TP. Methods: Three single-donor LQP units were pooled. Aliquots were frozen, and samples were thawed on Day 0 (TP0) then refrigerated for 5 days (TP5). The remaining LQP was kept refrigerated for 28 days, and aliquots were analyzed every 7 days. The EC monolayer was stimulated with TNF-α (10 ng/mL), inducing permeability, followed by a treatment with TP0, TP5, or LQP aged 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Permeability was measured by leakage of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran through the EC monolayer. Hemostatic profiles of samples were evaluated by thrombogram and thromboelastogram. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way analysis of variance, with p < 0.05 deemed significant. Results: TNF-α increased permeability of the EC monolayer twofold compared with medium control. There was a significant decrease in permeability at 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days when LQP was used to treat TNF-α-induced EC monolayers (p < 0.001). LQP was as effective as TP0 and TP5 at reducing permeability. Stored LQP retained the capacity to generate thrombin and form a clot. Conclusion: LQP corrected TNF-α-induced EC permeability and preserved hemostatic potential after 28 days of storage, similar to TP stored for 5 days. The significant logistical benefit (fivefold) of prolonged LQP storage improves the immediate availability of plasma as a primary resuscitative fluid for bleeding patients.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research Network held its third annual Remote Damage Control Resuscitation Symposium in June 2013 in Bergen, Norway. The Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research Network is a multidisciplinary group of investigators with a common interest in improving outcomes and safety in patients with severe traumatic injury. The network's mission is to reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality from traumatic hemorrhagic shock, in the prehospital phase of resuscitation through research, education, and training. The concept of remote damage control resuscitation is in its infancy, and there is a significant amount of work that needs to be done to improve outcomes for patients with life-threatening bleeding secondary to injury. The prehospital phase of resuscitation is critical in these patients. If shock and coagulopathy can be rapidly identified and minimized before hospital admission, this will very likely reduce morbidity and mortality. This position statement begins to standardize the terms used, provides an acceptable range of therapeutic options, and identifies the major knowledge gaps in the field.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Shock (Augusta, Ga.)
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    John B Holcomb · Shibani Pati
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    ABSTRACT: Over the past century, blood banking and transfusion practices have moved from whole blood therapy to components. In trauma patients, the shift to component therapy was achieved without clinically validating which patients needed which blood products. Over the past 4 decades, this lack of clinical validation has led to uncertainty on how to optimally use blood products and has likely resulted in both overuse and underuse in injured patients. However, recent data from both US military operations and civilian trauma centers have shown a survival advantage with a balanced transfusion ratio of RBCs, plasma, and platelets. This has been extended to include the prehospital arena, where thawed plasma, RBCs, and antifibrinolytics are becoming more widely used. The Texas Trauma Institute in Houston has followed this progression by putting RBCs and thawed plasma in the emergency department and liquid plasma and RBCs on helicopters, transfusing platelets earlier, and using thromboelastogram-guided approaches. These changes have not only resulted in improved outcomes, but have also decreased inflammatory complications, operations, and overall use of blood products. In addition, studies have shown that resuscitating with plasma (instead of crystalloid) repairs the "endotheliopathy of trauma," or the systemic endothelial injury and dysfunction that lead to coagulation disturbances and inflammation. Data from the Trauma Outcomes Group, the Prospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) study, and the ongoing Pragmatic Randomized Optimal Platelet and Plasma Ratios (PROPPR) trial represent a decade-long effort to programmatically determine optimal resuscitation practices, balancing risk versus benefits. With injury as the leading cause of death in patients age 1 to 44 years and hemorrhage the leading cause of potentially preventable death in this group, high-quality data must be obtained to provide superior care to the civilian and combat injured.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2013 · Hematology
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    ABSTRACT: Autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (AMNCs) have shown therapeutic promise for central nervous system insults such as stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). We hypothesized that intravenous injection of AMNC provides neuroprotection, which leads to cognitive improvement after TBI. A controlled cortical impact (CCI) rodent TBI model was used to examine blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, neuronal and glial apoptosis, as well as cognitive behavior. Two groups of rats underwent CCI with (CCI-autologous) or without AMNC treatment (CCI-alone), consisting of 2 million AMNC per kilogram body weight harvested from the tibia and intravenously injected 72 hours after injury. CCI-alone animals underwent sham harvests and received vehicle injections. Ninety-six hours after injury, AMNC significantly reduced the BBB permeability in injured animals, and there was an increase in apoptosis of proinflammatory activated microglia in the ipsilateral hippocampus. At 4 weeks after injury, we examined changes in spatial memory after TBI owing to AMNC treatment. There was a significant improvement in probe testing of CCI-autologous group in comparison with CCI-alone in the Morris Water Maze paradigm. Our data demonstrate that the intravenous injection of AMNC after TBI leads to neuroprotection by preserving early BBB integrity and increasing activated microglial apoptosis. In addition, AMNC also improves cognitive function.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2013

Publication Stats

2k Citations
262.83 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014-2015
    • Blood Systems Research Institute
      San Francisco, California, United States
  • 2012-2015
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • Department of Laboratory Medicine
      San Francisco, California, United States
  • 2002-2015
    • Loyola University Maryland
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2013
    • Washington University in St. Louis
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
  • 2009-2013
    • University of Houston
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 2010-2012
    • University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
      • • Department of Surgery
      • • Center for Translational Injury Research (CeTIR)
      Houston, Texas, United States
    • University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
      • Department of Cardiology
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 2009-2010
    • University of Texas Medical School
      • Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 2008
    • Baylor College of Medicine
      • Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 2006
    • Columbia University
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2005-2006
    • University of Maryland, Baltimore
      • Institute of Human Virology
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States